Handguard install

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Casey., Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    Hi all,

    I'm new to all aspects of motorcycling, and I'm adding my first thing to the bike: handguards. Following the directions was simple enough, but I'm looking for some sort of technique/trick to getting the rubber sleeve into the bar end. I chopped the grip's end off, and pushed the guard's assembly in, but the rubber sleeve is SO damn tight that even with twisting and swearing, it only gets about half-way in (the back end bulges, making it even more impossible). I about ground my palm raw in the process.
    I'm going on the deduction that my stock CRF250L handlebars are steel (powder-coated, magnetic).
    Thanks for helping out a noob.
    #1
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    55,351
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    I'm not familiar with your specific guards, but one way to make rubber slippery, but yet stick when dry is to use hairspray as a lube. It is slick until it dries, then stickey. I would assume this is your goal.

    Jim :brow
    #2
  3. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    That does sound effective. I have Tusk D-Flex guards.
    Thanks.
    #3
  4. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    955
    Location:
    Eastern YahooLand
    I use Dawn dish soap. I use it when flipping rear knobby tires or installing new ones. When dry it helps grip.

    Most bar end mounting hand guards for dirt bikes have an expanding alloy piece that tightens against the inside wall when the external set screw (normally a 5mm hex) is tightened. Like the above poster, I'm curious. What are you installing?

    Stu
    #4
  5. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    Awesome. I do have that handy - I don't think I have any hairspray.
    Yes, you described the mechanism exactly. I had the set screw as loose as possible. I will give the soap a try when I get home tonight.
    #5
  6. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,748
    Location:
    Hiding off Hwy 6, B.C.
    Yes the dish soap, Sunlight for me but any brand will work.:clap

    Hairspray....I finally got some at the Dollar store last year, good to apply on seats and make them less slippery. Funny also makes them shiny like ArmorAll without the side effects.:lol3

    New foam grips to install on my bike, them can be very hard to install but I am cheap and use the bicycle ones, cheaper but may be a tad smaller than the moto ones. Always used dish soap but will try the hairspray.:wink:
    #6
  7. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    The dish soap worked excellently! Thank you. The left side was an extremely tight fit requiring the soap. The throttle side slid in without the need. They are both firmly in place now though.
    #7
  8. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    955
    Location:
    Eastern YahooLand
    What is this that you mention in your first post? Can you post a pix?

    When I install handlebar grips I just use contact cleaner on the inside of the grip, pour out the excess and slide them on. I put some 3M gorilla snot on the bar itself first. After the contact cleaner / gorilla snot combo dries I always safety wire the grips at both ends. I do not use dish soap on handlebar grips.

    Stu
    #8
  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    55,351
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    For street bikes safety wire is usually not needed. If using foam or porus grips, dish soap is not a good idea. When they get wet they will slip. Not a big deal on the left side, but sucks when your grip slips on the throttle side.

    Jim :brow
    #9
  10. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    Stu,
    The rubber sleeve slipped around the expanding insert assembly that goes inside the handlebar to secure one end of the handguards. The instructions said to use the sleeve if installing into steel bars, and not to use it if installing into aluminum. This is the exact assembly:
    [​IMG]

    My last concern is getting junk into the throttle tube. I had to dremel the end of the tube and grip off to expose the handlebar opening. I put the guard assembly into the bar, so the bar itself is nicely sealed, but the space between the handlebar and the throttle tube is now exposed. I fear that if I drop the bike on its right side into mud/sand, I'll have a load of junk wedged in there. Any other tricks to seal this gap without hindering throttle movement? I'll get pictures tonight.
    #10
  11. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,890
    Location:
    Da UP, eh! (Marquette, MI)
    I wouldn't worry about that small gap. The same issue exists on my wife's tw200 with the tusk handguards.

    She has crashed tons of times in the dirt, and has never had a problem with getting dirt/grit interferring with the throttle.
    #11
  12. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    955
    Location:
    Eastern YahooLand
    Thanks! All the bar guards I have used (the latest being Cycra style from Sicass Racing) never use a rubber sleeve since the knurled expanding sleeve holds the guard in place until a really hard hit moves it up or down. I would attempt to get the inner sleeve to retract or be as loose as possible, slide the rubber sleeve on it, lube the rubber sleeve with dish soap and work the assembly into the bar end. Then tighten it up.

    I have never attempted to put anything that would seal the end of the throttle tube from dirt. If you do there is a good chance you will restrict throttle closing in the event of a crash which would be far worse than getting a bit of dirt through the very small gap between the throttle tube and the bar. I disassemble this every season (twice a year) and clean out whatever might be in there and then lube the handlebar with a thin smear of white grease before I re-install it. I have found very little dirt inside the tube. However, cleaning & lubing does keep the tube free to move, and close, especially if the motorcycle and I have parted company. (It is sometimes fully justified in bucking me off and does so with apparent delight.)

    Stu
    #12
  13. Casey.

    Casey. Nerd on a bike

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Wichita, KS, USA
    Here's what the bike looks like with the new guards:

    [​IMG]

    and here's the throttle side attachment. It sounds like the gap isn't a cause for concern.

    [​IMG]
    #13