Hate to see this sort of thing..

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Heyload, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Heyload

    Heyload Remastered Classic

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    Guy just purchased his first bike, no experience, insisted on riding it home from the dealership.

    Rider killed leaving dealership

    It highlights what I've seen as a growing trend in San Antonio, alot of riders that seem very inexperienced, or riding in a fashion that reflects little to no regard for traffic laws or safety.

    Just the other day I witnessed a group of sportbike riders do something incredibly stupid. They were stopped at a stop light behind another vehicle. As a group, they suddenly pulled around the vehicle in front of them and then ripped through the intersection, running the red light. I couldn't believe what I was seeing.

    Another sportbike rider just the other day, weaving in and out of traffic at a speed considerably over the speedlimit.



    What the hell is going on here? Did common sense take a holiday?
    #1
  2. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Been here awhile

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    People dying on new bikes and riding like fools is nothing new.
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  3. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    The story states he didn't have a motorcycle license (endorsement). OK... then the dealership should say (insisted) "you're not riding it home". By law, don't you need an endorsement to operate a motorcycle on a public street anyway?

    Yep, he's a big boy and can make his own choices and I am NOT blaming the dealership. It's just incredibly stupid by both parties involved and now someone is dead.
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  4. Heyload

    Heyload Remastered Classic

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    I think it really points out the need for proper training.

    I mean, I wouldn't think of flying an airplane or sailing a boat without proper training.

    I don't get why people think operating a motorcycle or a car is any different.

    I remember being in that very dealership once when some 19-20 something year old came in looking to buy a Hayabusa. The salesman asked him if he had any experience and the kid said no. The salesman flat refused to sell him the bike.

    Of course, this was years ago, I guess now it's all about schlepping the gelt with these dealerships.

    I wonder if I could start a mentoring program for people wanting to start riding? Just talk to them and try to get them to understand how important proper training is, what to expect, that sort of thing.
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  5. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    At what point should a dealer of any item, whether it be a motorcycle, firearm, or chicken wing, be required to insist that the purchaser be trained to use the item?

    In this instance, the dealer offered to deliver the motorcycle. Refused by purchaser.

    I can go to my local big box home supply store and buy a chainsaw. Aren't chainsaws dangerous? I fail to see why motorcycle dealers get such "special" treatment in cases like this.
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  6. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Been here awhile

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    Again, nothing new about a dealership or individual refusing to sell a hot bike to a novice, or chosing to. It's gone both ways for as long as there have been hot bikes or novice riders.

    Mentoring type programs have long existed. As well training. Many (most?) folk will refuse it given the choice.
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  7. bigflax925

    bigflax925 Adventurer

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    Tragic, yes. Preventable, yes. Is the dealership at fault? Maybe for not insisting to deliver it. I am not sure the laws in Texas, but I bought my first bike without a license. However, I didn't ride it until after I completed MSF and then got my endorsement.

    The dealership offered to deliver the bike to his house. Sometimes machismo gets in the way of rational thinking.
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  8. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

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    Dealership has no authority to enforce any laws.
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  9. doc4216

    doc4216 Chronic High Fiver

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    My buddy just bought a brand new victory judge and the dealer wouldn't let him drive it off the lot because he didn't have his endorsement. I had to go pick it up for him... Which of course I didn't mind :-)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
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  10. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    I agree but if I couldn't produce a valid driver's license when buying a car you can bet they wouldn't let me take the car home from behind the wheel. Why would asking to see an endorsement or papers that show training be any different?
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  11. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    I think that was the right thing to do... by the dealership and you!
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  12. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    Operating power tools such as a chainsaw doesn't require licensed training. Operating a vehicle or motorcycle on the street does. Apples to oranges comparison other than the fact that they both can hurt you.
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  13. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    So, to skewer that comparison just a bit, how about buying a 450cc dirt bike -- not street legal?
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  14. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    I like your thinking... but, you couldn't ride it home on the street if you wanted to. No endorsement need.

    A better comparison is a scooter less that 150cc. Fast enough to kill you but not enough cc's to require an endorsement and all street legal.
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  15. Tonk

    Tonk Broken Adventurer

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    I feel for the woman that hit him. I would think an endorsement is required to operate on public roads not only to protect the rider but also to show that the rider understands his/her role in properly using the roadways. One persons actions affect another persons actions. I feel horrible for the rider but the poor driver of the SUV has to live with this experience.
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  16. pilesofmiles

    pilesofmiles Life is an Adventure

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    Well said. Nobody wins in this situation. Sad....
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  17. JOKER650

    JOKER650 Long timer

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    TIRE WAX
    :muutt
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  18. doxiedog

    doxiedog Been here awhile

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    I pulled into the ducati shop on my sv650.
    The dealer was showing a kid,this is the clutch,and this is the throttle
    On a duc xyz superbike!.
    I pulled right back out of there,before the show started.
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  19. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Been here awhile

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    Generally speaking, once the car is your property, they have no longer have legal control over what you do with it.
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  20. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    Ultimately it is the buyer's responsibility to understand the risks and gain the proper training when purchasing a motorcycle. I agree that the dealerships are NOT legally responsible for making sure their customers are trained before riding off. However, it would make an incredibly smart and moral business practice. As the OP stated, the dealership did offer to deliver and the customer refused. I wonder if the fatal accident will change their own dealership policy.
    #20