1. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Thanks. Waking up early and riding all day are my only suggestions. A lot can be seen if breaks are short, food is packed/snacked and you never know quite where you'll end up that night :nod

    Certainly could have been much worse if I was leading...especially if I missed it and he hit it. Be careful out there for fallen rocks and trees.
  2. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,960
    Location:
    Collinsville Va
    You know, the older I get the more sense the saying, "Never out drive your line of sight" makes. But after you took a pic of that knoll it seems like more of just the perfect storm in your case. Amazing you kept the bike upright.
  3. OldnoGPS

    OldnoGPS Just a sightseer

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,455
    Location:
    Virginia
    I guess people think us older riders are slower because our reaction times, skills, eyesight, etc. are diminishing. All true to various extents, but in my case I slowed down a long time ago more from the experience of coming around corners with the mailman in my lane stopped, farmers on tractors coming out of blind field entrances with hay bale spears pointed at you, drivers even farther on my side than usual (especially on gravel backroads), etc. etc. Clearer sightlines are why I much prefer riding in the winter.
    Anyway, it sounds like a good excuse for being slow. (Hey, I'm 4.7% faster in the winter...) :D
  4. DCrider

    DCrider Live from THE Hill

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,924
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    yep a couple of damn good updates :thumb
  5. OleGrumpy

    OleGrumpy TFM/ODS Proficient

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    15,134
    Location:
    Mountains of Virginia
    Hey HBN! the next time you are down around Franklin, NC, you should check out Wayah Road. And if you are just riding around WV, Knobley Road or Patterson Creek road are some nice rides.

    Google Earth is your friend.:lol3
  6. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Thanks for the advice. Just back from a 1700+ mi weekend and do I have a RR for you! I even kept an evening journal of my ride so this one should be heavier on the words than pics as usual. :D
    [​IMG]
  7. JaxObsessed

    JaxObsessed Endeavor to persevere.

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    23,652
    Location:
    From Alabama to Newfoundland, it's all Appalachian
  8. REAPER_ONE

    REAPER_ONE YOU'RE DONE

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,221
    Mike, if you don't have basecamp app on your computer from Garmin; you can add for free and make some kick ass gpx files from your NUVI 500/550 data... I just want to see the route you took. :wink:
  9. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    I'll be sure to look into that. My garmin is pretty fucked right now but she should live enough to extract some waypoints.

    Somewhere in ADK for the third or fourth time of the trip before I figured out it's secret way to turn on. (Insert insertion joke here)
    [​IMG]
  10. REAPER_ONE

    REAPER_ONE YOU'RE DONE

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,221

    you going to be at Dr. Beard's Thursday?
  11. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Yeah and I'll see if I can dig up my Garmin cable somewhere... :dunno
  12. REAPER_ONE

    REAPER_ONE YOU'RE DONE

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,221
    I'll show you...
  13. biker128pedal

    biker128pedal Super Lurker

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,213
    Location:
    Eastern, VA
  14. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    OHHH YEAH! Got the pics edited and there are some good ones.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This for an hour or two getting lost in Great Whetstone
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :evil
    [​IMG]
  15. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,175
    Location:
    North Chesterfield, VA
    +1 on Wayah Road. :nod

    .
  16. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,534
    Location:
    SW PA.
    HBN,

    Was talking to your old boss at the Marshal RTE this past Sunday. Heard about how you two would have to "hum hum, get on the bikes to go check out some things"

    Funny stuff.

    BTW the discussion was about how much I enjoy your pics. The same can be said for Denis also. I wish I had the discipline to stop and press the shutter myself more often.
  17. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Oh yeah we had some interesting times...
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kyagoxD8BFo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    My ears must have been burning. I sent him an email since it'd had been a while since I've visited. If you have trouble stopping to take shots, just velcro/strap a camera to your jacket and snap them while moving - don't have to stop.
  18. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,534
    Location:
    SW PA.
    I have a better idea. I'll just ride w/you. I'll bring the IPA , you bring the camera.
  19. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Thu Aug 8, 2013
    Traffic was expectedly light leaving DC on 495 to 270;
    [​IMG]
    I slabbed it on up to Harrisburg on 15 where I cruised up the river to Clark's Valley. I enjoy frequenting this straight road through the valley as a calm break from the slab. I stopped for a snack break beside Fishing Creek and was pleasantly greeted by the cool water, damp rotten log and fog hanging over the creek.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Shortly after leaving, I spotted a sign in a driveway for "free cucumbers". I now regret not stopping and turning around for both the photo and nature's sustenance. I should not be so foolish in the future. From the narrow valley rd, I grew tired of the close-following car and made a left to climb the steep mountain to the next valley above.
    [​IMG]

    Riding some gravel and waving at a kid in his front yard, I turned left and headed north to follow Garmin on a collection of curvy and traffic free roads through forest and farmlands.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The weather held out and I was pleasantly greeted with blue skies and enough clouds to keep the sun out of the eyes. The most memorable road today was Winding Rd, which lived up to its name.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    It was bumpy and rutted with lots of shoulder patching for a few miles up to the county line sign where a yellow stripe appeared and the pavement was fresh and new.
    [​IMG]

    I think I know which county has all the money, or the higher taxes. The banked turns snaking along the creek and rising and falling out of corn fields was serene. 29N was also a comfortable and rolling highway following creeks and rivers with light traffic volume. The many cabins and small wooded homes often lead me to consider my future. An aging long haired man tends his yard-sized garden, fortressed by an L-Shaped home and handcrafted slate fence. Will I be him someday? No...too near the road. Crossing the upper reaches of the Susquehanna, the air is thick with the pungent smell of decaying fish.
    [​IMG]

    I recognize the turn for Hwy6, a nice E/W route across the state of PA. I pushed on and avoided the highway until crossing the NY line at 7:30PM. .
    [​IMG]

    I cross referenced my GPS with my cell phone to uncover a vast line of yellow/red storms on the radar swiftly approaching and covering the course of my GPS already.
    [​IMG]

    With no real destination and the chance of severe weather, I made the decision to find camp outside Binghamton. Slabbing it for 10 mi up I-81, the rosy sky kept me company as the sun kissed the wet clouds ahead to the north. The highway splits at one point and big 18-wheeler signals and comes over into my lane. I quickly swerve, drop a gear and blast past with a big middle finger for the world to see. A brief reminder of the hazards of highway riding - all avoidable by not getting near the truck to begin with. Live and learn. Such is life. The dark sky ahead led me to pull into a dark and overgrown commercial property for sale. 122 acres of forgotten dreams and desolate concrete foundations just north of Binghamton. The locked gate deters me but I notice a frequented ATV trail disappearing into the brush so take the risk and follow it around the gate back to the main access road. I travel a short way keeping an eye out for nails and debris on this forgotten road before quickly approaching a 3-4ft hole in the road.
    [​IMG]

    Frequent high water left an area between two marshes to collapse entirely. A car would not have made it...neither would a police cruiser. This is promising news except that they still have feet. The GS cut through the narrow gap with a few dabs and one "Oh shit no ground there" moment! I eventually came to a lake and clearing with concrete pad and remains of a rusted out railcar. I park on the pad, scout out some hammockable trees, establish camp and feast on cous cous, tuna and Crown Royal.
    [​IMG]

    I enjoy a granola bar and some dried cranberries as the sun sinks lower behind the mountain range and light fades. The flash of lightning accompanies the deep rumble of thunder signaling I had chosen the best time and place to stop for the night. As I write in my hammock, the brilliant flashes illuminate the sky with approaching fervor offset by the whine of 18-wheeler tires, the rusted exhaust burble of antique V-8 trucks and familiar "potato-potato-potato" blat of Harleys moving on down the highway to be met with glorious life-breathing rain. I should stay dry but cannot guarantee avoiding electrocution. A 90 horsepower dirt bike, GPS unit and hammock in the few trees of a sparsely recovering commercial site: Such is life in the modern times.
  20. HBN

    HBN lostwithmike.com

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,055
    Location:
    Seat of my Ruckus
    Fri Aug 9, 2013
    NOTE TO SELF: Keep this book dry!
    I slept lightly on account of the severe t-storms which paraded over me through the course of the wet night. Rain pelted the hammock fly and came down so hard as to bounce off adjacent plants and soak the underside of my hammock. I woke at 5 just before my alarm had the shrill offensive opportunity to. I checked the radar and was alarmed at the large fast approaching cell. I hurriedly packed up, something I always train for, and stowed the wet gear in my new shiny cases. As I donned my riding gear, I was greeted by the heavy and frequent splatter of Forest Gump style "Big Fat Raindrops". I hurriedly put on my awkward stich' Triple Digit covers in the dark. The intensity of the rain still allowed my gloves to get wet in the process. I thumbed the starter then turned on the GPS. Not a sign of life from the GPS. FUCK! And FUCK IT! I babied the throttle on the wet grass and sand to avoid an early morning experiment in loss of traction eventually making it to the sink/fallen road shown yesterday. With a fogged face shield, cold engine and half a protein bar in me, I thread the needle between a 2ft drop on my left and the rising water/swamp to my right. Fortunately I negotiated it well and completed the ATV trail and tank trap to return to legal civilization at the highway. The rain was heavy and I pulled in behind a box truck and attempted to follow his flickering brake lights as they disappeared in the fog and road spray. The sun made no indication it was ready to rise so the treacherous journey of poor visibility continued. After 15 miles or so, I stopped to clean my visor inside a gas station in Oxford, NY then proceed to Norwich for a cup of HOT!!! McDonald's coffee, 300 calorie sausage burrito, electrical outlets for charging and table to dismantle my broken GPS unit.
    [​IMG]

    While charging my electronic devices and sipping the nuclear hot drivel mistakenly advertised as coffee, I succeeded in repairing the GPS. I sent a few emails/pics and checked the radar. Shit! Another storm fast approaching and rain drops already marring the serenity of parking lot puddles. Time to roll!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I managed to ride out the rest of my tank by plugging in NY Hwy 28's terminus into my GPS. I fueled up at Hwy 28, and then repaired the GPS once more as a local sat inside sipping coffee and stared at me. Hwy 28 was pleasant, wide and with minimal traffic. The cabins and lake homes characterized the architecture of the region. If it wasn't so damn cold and frozen most of the year, I'd consider relocating.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The rain picked up from a drizzle to a heavy down pour leading to less passing of cars and a slower safer driving speed. I'd pass the SUV ahead of me only to be presented with a gorgeous photo opportunity a mile down the road. Being dedicated to taking pictures for unique sights necessitates frequent u-turns and breaks.

    Moose River in the rain.
    [​IMG]

    Strange drilled hole in a rock.
    [​IMG]

    Making tracks!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    By the time I reached Saranac Lake, I was ready for a coffee break.
    [​IMG]

    I'd been riding in this rain for hours so a dry overhand was all I needed. The corner gas station in downtown was between owners evidenced by the boarded pumps and shuttered windows. I brewed a cup of Joe and listened to the church bells ring the hour.
    [​IMG]

    Two dudes in a red truck pulled in shortly thereafter, eyed me up, then proceeded to fix some wiring or electrical problem between the fuse block and the engine. I packed up and left after offering them a hand.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This cracked me up!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Worth a U-turn I'd say.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    An hour of heading north led me out of the storm and into lightening clouds transitions into blue pockets of sky.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    It wasn't long before I approached the Trout River Crossing.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Miles before, I noted I was low on gas but just now realized it'd be a hell more expensive over the border. I rode to the nearest gas station in Fort Covington 9miles east to fill up then crossed uneventfully, but with more questions than usual. A certain smile and warmth grows within when I return to Canada. The French signage and unique symbols remind me I'm far from home.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Following the St. Lawrence River northward, I can't help but notice how similar the landscape is to Delaware's agricultural lands.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I pick up some groceries and don't even attempt to parle' au Francais. I also take the time in the store to dry my wet gear from the night before around and on my GS.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I head for Vieux-Montreal but construction has closed a bridge in the NB direction so I wound up sitting in traffic for 30 min or more before actually crossing the river.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The state of repair of these active bridges was disconcerting.
    [​IMG]

    The views of the city skyline from the bridge were nice though. I made my way slowly to Rue Guy through the imposing and ugly financial business district of concrete & glass then dropped back down to the river.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Skateboard sounds pretty good after sitting in traffic.
    [​IMG]


    I saw 4 Katanas within a 4 mi stretch of road. Sup wit dat!?
    [​IMG]

    The Old Port along the river is an interesting mix of architecture and old city charm. To say the fit ladies on bicycles were distracting would be an understatement.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The port area reminded me of San Francisco with the boulevard, old wharf, warehouses and pedestrian only zones. I attempted to to take a short video through the old part of town but I don't think it came through. I spotted a brick n the side of a building "1655" Yeah I'd say this has been here a while.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I stopped at 2 gift shops searching for stickers but neither had any for sale.

    Folks sure dress differently here too...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The street smelled like stale beer.
    [​IMG]

    I rode N along the water then paused from traffic and the heat to take off my jeans, devour an orange, hydrate and take some pics of the amusement park on an island in the river.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I plugged away at the GPS for a minute and routed the bike toward a random lake about 100 mi north of Montreal and hit "GO!" I mistakenly put myself on course to escape Montreal from the center at 5pm on a Friday. What the hell was I thinking? Route 15N and 117N were terrible with congestion taking me nearly 2 hours of stop and go, high engine temp, jacket open and flapping bullshit before I jumped ship and took a right to finally get some breeze and back roads in.
    [​IMG]

    STRANGE to see it in French.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    In all the traffic I never once heard a horn or noted anyone driving aggressively or trying to beat another person to the next gap in cars. Oh Canada! Suburbs gave way to farmland and I quickly found myself racing the fading sun across fertile land under ominous northern clouds.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I ordered a cup of coffee and double chocolate in French at Tim's, made a fool of myself, filled my camelback, emailed with free wifi and laid out a route up 337 to 125 to consume the remainder of the day.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Chasing the sun into the hills that rose around me in the Golden Hour, I passed many "Lac"s and "Camping Familie" signs but didn't want to pay to be around people and away from solitude. I pushed on.
    [​IMG]

    The "Moose" sign was a sobering reminder I need to get my southern tail off the back roads before I hit a critter. In Notre Dame-de-la-Merci, I checked the regional map kiosk then went down the next random road I came across.
    [​IMG]

    It grew darker and I turned on the HID illuminating lots of signs reading "Maison/Terrain AVENDOR" but a certain ATV/Snow machine path caught my eye. The rocky trail was fine for the GS and I thankfully descended a valley to a jet black river below.
    [​IMG]

    The soft cascades flowed under a worn out seasonal bridge with treacherous holes poked through the decking. Directly across the bridge was a fire ring and big flat rock for bathing.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    This is absolutely perfect. I cannot hear a car, a person - just the rushing water and the wind in the spruce.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The brown tannic water was much warmer than I expected as I slipped below the current and took a much needed bath at sunset. Afterward the reddish boulders still radiated heat from the warm clear day. I've found my destination and never knew where it'd be. I cooked up a small meal, had some smuggled Crown Royal, cleaned up my meal then got into my hammock for a chilly night at 47 degrees north. I'll probably wish I had my heated jacket in the AM. Eyes Heavy. Time to sleep.