HD 10mm 12pt Caliper Bolts - Spline Sockets?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HapHazard, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Start the pinch bolts in backwards and put a piece of flat stock in the split. Tighten bolts against the stock to spread the clamp. Should help free things up.
    #21
  2. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    ^I ran out into the garage to give it a try. I tightened the bolt in as directed against steel stock in the slot as tight as I dared with a closed end wrench (pretty tight), twisted, pulled tapped with hammer on top with spacer - no joy.:cry

    I gave it another shot of penetrating oil. How much force should I tighten the bolt?

    Many thanks!
    #22
  3. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Be careful. I wouldn't get too eager on that, especially if the triple is a casting. All you want to do is relax any tension it might have. Let it soak and occasionally tap the clamp with a plastic hammer. If you can get a strap wrench, you could try twisting the tube to free it up.
    #23
  4. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

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    again, heat and kroil will be your friends in getting the leg to budge . . . and those triple trees are kinda fragile (learn from MY mistake and make your own new ones)
    #24
  5. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    Yeah, I didn't think that really cranking on the pinch bolt was safe (and glad I didn't do it!).

    I'll keep up the soaking (the other leg was really rusted on the lower clamp) and tapping it while I round up a strap wrench (excellent suggestion!). Online and locally there seem to be a lot of cheap strap wrenches that don't even survive one use. It's too bad for me my neighbor the plumber retired and moved south - he would probably have had 3 good ones!

    Many thanks again, guys!
    #25
  6. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Take the top bolt (the 1 3/8" one) and loosen a couple turns. Then whack it (the bolt) with a dead blow hammer a few times driving the tube downward in the trees. You'll have to remove the bars to get a good shot at it.
    #26
  7. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    Well, unfortunately I didn't do EXACTLY that. I had removed the top bolt, and had used an old, wasted deep socket as an extension/buffer to hammer the fork tube down. I was unable to twist the tube at all, and the only way to move it was by hitting it ALL the way down (it never seemed to loosen, and I continued to oil the tube). There was A LOT of rust in the lower clamp, and quite a bit in the upper, too. Unfortunately, the socket bouncing around buggered up the first thread in the "fork plug". Lacking a 16mm x 1.5 rethreading tap, I guess I will Dremel out the damaged part of the top thread (my diesel mechanic neighbor suggested that) unless someone has a different idea. Worse come to worst, I guess I can replace the "plug".

    Here's my "handiwork":fpalm

    [​IMG]

    (Plenty of rust visible)
    I've never had to deal with such a stubborn fork leg before.
    I don't know what else Mr. Murphy has in store for me after this...:lol3
    #27
  8. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    Success! A friend of mine lent me a tapered end mill larger than the plug opening. We pushed a scrap of foam rubber into the fork to catch the metal filings. I used an air die grinder with the mill and cleaned up the top thread area. I could start the nut by hand, and worked it down with Tap Magic. Then took out the nut, used a shop vac to suck out the metal scraps and pulled out the foam. Now I can start putting the front end together! Thanks to all!
    #28