HD Dyna Lowrider

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by silverbandit1, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. silverbandit1

    silverbandit1 Long timer

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    Jun 5, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,008
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    NorCal
    I have found an 03' 100th anniversary Dyna Lowrider with less than 4k miles, Vance & Hines exhaust and detachable screen - other than that it is stock and looks nearly showroom.

    I really don't know much about Harleys but I have been intrigued by them for a long time but just couldn't justify spending big $$$ on a new one.

    I want to rent one first before making a decision - as the dream maybe way different than reality.

    The seller is asking $8500 and it still has its original tires on it

    So what can you tell me
    #1
  2. gymply

    gymply Been here awhile

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    Dec 20, 2007
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    Fort Worth
    I would replace the 10 year old tires immediately and then ride the hell out of it. At 4K, the bike is just now broken in. The only known issue (that I am aware of) is the cam chain tensioners. The spring-loaded tensioner shoe is a wear item and should be inspected every 25K miles or so. It is pretty easy to inspect, but on most models you will have to pull the exhaust to get into the cam cover. I say go for it!
    #2
  3. ERD

    ERD Custom Rider

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    386
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas, USA
    I have the exact same bike. $8500 is a little high to ask for this bike. It's worth about $7000-$7500 retail consider that it needs a lot of work.

    +
    1. Very low seat height.
    2. Easy to ride.
    3. Very fast.
    4. It has the lowest seat height and weight for the big twin Harley for its time
    5. It has a tach on the tank!
    6. Nice aluminum rims with 150 rear tire! NO TUBEs!!!

    -
    1. Windscreen to far forward and will produce excessive glare from headlight at night. I mounted a windscreen bag and replace the lexan with a smoked one to reduce the night glare.
    2. Low frame will scrape just about anywhere. Luckily all the vitals are protected by the frame.
    3. Mid controls are made for short inseam. Riding for long period will tire out legs. I put highway pegs on the engine guard. Parts to convert mid to forward control are still available. Some lowriders were ordered with forward controls.
    4. Heavy clutch hard for smooth take-off and tires out hand in low speed parade. Put in a easy clutch for <$50
    5. Front brakes sux... I upgraded all my single disk Harleys with SS brake lines and new non-factory pads. The 100/80-19 tires does not help with the braking.
    6. Thin seat pad and low rear spring travel. It's a lowrider for a reason...
    7. Goofy ignition switch. This one take some getting used to. Not only is it in a weird place (under the seat), the keys can be taken out with the ignition on ACC. It's a quick way to come back to a parked bike with a dead battery...

    Overall, I like my lowrider. To bad Harley decided to discontinue this model and made the low model on the Sporty and Fatboy.
    #3
  4. Trooper

    Trooper Been here awhile

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    Well, the tires are ten years old and should be replaced immediately. The Twin Cam motor includes cam chain tensioners with nylon composite shoes and these have proven to be a wear item even though they are not on the regular maintenance schedule. Some owners have seen these shoes wear down until there was metal to metal contact against the cam chain, while others have experienced no wear. Harley-Davidson changed from spring loaded to hydraulically loaded tension on the shoes in the Dyna line for the 2006 model year and for all Twin Cams with the introduction of the 96-cubic-inch Twin Cam for the 2007 model year. Some believe the only true fix for this is to go with an aftermarket gear driven set up. It is a simple upgrade and should not necessarily prevent you from buying a clean low mileage bike. If this bike is one that will have an issue with the cam shoes, it won't show up until around 20-25,000 miles so there is plenty of time to do the up grade. As far as the price he is asking, it doesn't seem out of line but may be a little high. Remember tires will set you back about $500 now a days.

    Greg
    #4
  5. blk-betty

    blk-betty bam-a-lam

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    Aug 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,491
    Location:
    Charleston, SC
    Ex-wife had a '02 Lowrider. Only real issue is that it is low so don't expect much corner clearance. Otherwise a great looking bike, although I don't care much for the 100th Anniv paint and tank badges.

    Haven't kept up with pricing lately so maybe I'm off base thinking that his asking price is about $500-1K above what it should be.
    #5
  6. GoonerYoda

    GoonerYoda Hot Dickens Cider

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    842
    Location:
    Wine Country, CA
    HD emblems adds 20% to the price. :D
    #6
  7. silverbandit1

    silverbandit1 Long timer

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    Called the local dealer and its $170 to change all fluids

    Rear tire $204.00 + $150 labor
    Front tire $150 + $100 labor

    KBB showed about $5500 for trade in and $7500 for dealer retail

    The local dealer has an 02' with nearly 70k miles and they are asking $8990 :huh
    #7
  8. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    Unless they are flushing the brakelines..you can save a bunch and do the oil yourself. If you can open a bottle of beer or turn on a faucet you have the aptitude to change oil(s) on an HD.

    It's so hard to price older bikes. If something is pristine, then it's worth much much more than something mediocre. So KBB is kinda worthless imho.

    Cakeeater
    #8
  9. blk-betty

    blk-betty bam-a-lam

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    So true, and if you have a lift or acces to a lift you can pull the front and rear wheels and take to the dealer and let them change and balance the tires. This is what I've done with all my HDs when they need new rubber. I think the dealer charged $35 to mount and balance if the wheels are off the bike.

    Much more of a pain with a touring HD but saves me money and should be easy peasy with the LowRider......only issue now that I think about it is you need a lift with extra low clearance to fit under the LowRider frame.
    #9
  10. gymply

    gymply Been here awhile

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    Fort Worth
    Agreed! The $45 bucks I spent on the factory service manual is the best money I've spent on the bike so far.
    #10
  11. ERD

    ERD Custom Rider

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Dallas, Texas, USA
    Everyone is looking to save a few dollars, but the lowrider is a pain to service without a lift. Most oil pans won't fit underneath without lifting bike. The lowrider, like most of the Harleys, are heavy and without a center stand. So you risk tipping the bike over by save about one to two hours of labor and take the wheel off while it is balancing on a floor jack - since it has no center stand and now has no front nor rear wheel. :eek1
    #11
  12. dickensheets

    dickensheets smprparatus

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    He could afford a stand if he skips $100 tire changes!!! Yikes.
    #12
  13. waveydavey

    waveydavey happy times!!

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    its not all that difficult...really...sheesh. My Softail with a springer front end is even lower and heavier and even a fat old guy like me can manage it easily.
    #13
  14. XT_Driftwood

    XT_Driftwood Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I bought my HD on a fly&ride and before I headed for home the PO showed me one of these he built...

    http://www.nightrider.com/biketech/bikelift.htm

    I built one for myself in about 30 minutes. It makes getting the front or rear off the ground a snap, but you can't do both at the same time.

    I'd use it for oil changes if I had to, but my T-Sport is tall enough that I can slip a pan under it easily.
    #14
  15. ERD

    ERD Custom Rider

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    Location:
    Dallas, Texas, USA

    I've seen and used one of these in my friends shop. The ones he had were made from heavy metal tubing and the bottom was a cam that allow the user to swing the bike up in a gentle lift motion. It was made and sold years ago and the company no longer in business. They really work well for front end service, but lifting the back isn't so stable as the bike's front end, which turns, can't be strapped down to something solid.
    #15
  16. silverbandit1

    silverbandit1 Long timer

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    At what mileage or age does the drive belt get replaced?
    #16
  17. inline4

    inline4 Long timer

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  18. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    A long, long, long time from what I've seen. 50,000 +

    A lot of people talk about hard maintenance with the bikes being so low. I have 2 pieces of roughly 2' x 2' plywood doubled up to make about a 1.5" spacer. Put them in front of the tires and drive foreword a foot. Sidestand goes on a scrap piece of 2x6. Leaves me plenty of room on every harley me or my dad has owned, including a lowered softail springer.

    Oil changes are stupidly easy, just takes a bit of time since theres 3 of them. I always make drain pans out of old antifreeze jugs for clearance. Wheel removal is basically the same as any bike once you get it off the ground. Changing tires by hand sucks, at least on my road king. Very stiff sidewalls. I'm either buying some better tire tools or going to the dealer next time. Foreword controls suck on the highway imo.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
    #18
  19. Murf2

    Murf2 Been here awhile

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    Feb 11, 2007
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    Location:
    Kansas
    The belt on my 89 FLHS had approx 130K on it when I broke down & replaced it. My 2000 Road King had over 50K when I sold it, still on original belt. I guess they don't have enough suds to break them. :D

    I agree with jules083, basic service is stupid simple & I've never had a real mechanical problem I've had to deal with on either bike.

    Good Luck!

    Murf
    #19