Helicopters R Us

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Weirdo, Dec 23, 2004.

  1. slideways

    slideways permanent ex-pat

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    Everything you want to know about coms with ATC

    http://scottsasha.com/aviation/plans/commshandout.html

    Also if you join AOPA they have interactive training called Say It Right which will help you with transitioning through all the different types of airspace with what to say and what to expect ATC to say.

    Low level flights on the East coast of Florida you are constantly on the radio transitioning through B, C and D airspace Flight Following, Miami radio, ATIS , AWOS etc. For me the easiest thing to do is write down all the radio freqs on my kneeboard in the order I will be using them.

    I just did a check ride a couple days ago and the FAA is very serious about proper radio coms even into uncontrolled airports.
  2. BeeDub

    BeeDub Havagoowan

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    Thanks for that! That's what I used to do with my radio freqs too, when I was flying regularly in all the airspace around LA. Luckily though, my check ride was out in the desert, so I didn't get tripped up...
  3. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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    It's not too often that the conditions cause the static to build up enough to cause a discharge. Usually under normal sling jobs a good zap is the cause of much hilarity. If there's snow falling or dark clouds in the area it's a good sign that the hook is going to be hot. The day that we stacked that tower the hook was cold, but yes there is a electrical cable in the centre of the line to run the remote hook, so it is conductive.

    Knowing that every load potentially can come off it's critical to reduce the exposure time to the absolute minimum.

    Some good points here in a video that Vardy made a couple of years ago with a bunch of footage of the Skyline crew and this mut here:

    http://ram.canadacast.ca/asxgen/transport/HOOK/HookEN.wmv

    Don't get under the load unless it's necessary, don't get lazy, keep your eye on the hook.
  4. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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    Hey when you're right you're right. Overhead loads are a risk! I think it's cool that you caught how the lift was put into place. The difference with a heli lift is that you have to factor wind into how you get your pick up and into the drop given the ground hazards. Lucky for me on this day the winds were in my favour and there was a good way in and out of the drop with only a one set of wires as an obstacle that had me concerned.

    I talked to Brad tonight, he's doing great. It's funny he's be doing this game for a lot longer than me, but we have the about the same amount of hours. He's my mentor in this gig, I suppose we all need a mentor.
  5. kamanya

    kamanya Andrew to most

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    Sheeeet!

    Is that how smooth they all go?

    I imagine there are a myriad of things that can make that a lot less fun?

    - Bit of wind
    - Less experience on all sides
    - Mechanical issues
    and and and

    Props to you Sir.
  6. seriousracer

    seriousracer be a man dodge tree bark

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    WTH Goede!! what was your job?
  7. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    The organisation I work for (I do tech services / tech records) a LOT of our work is longlining - we have one of if not the highest RIN count 407 in the world, brand new out of the factor we timex the mast on Rin in about 2500hrs.

    We also have Mil8 and one here a few years back was slinging a 20foot container, he had tension on the line and facing in to wind just in the hover waiting for the breeze to come good for the extra bit of transition (?) lift he needed - the russian crews are pretty good - shame about their paper work!

    Hay Ewe
  8. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    Dude that sounds awesome.

    ...

    Now if anyone could translate it into English, I bet I'd be even more impressed once I understood it! :huh :D
  9. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    ok, here goes...

    The organistion (the company) I work for I do the tech services / tech records (aircraft paperwork / compliance) and we do a lot of longlining (rope under neath the helicopter - like a airborn crane) - we have one of the highest if not the highest RIN count (REF/A/) 407 (model of bell helicopter) in the world (the planet we live on), brand new out of the factory we we times the mast on RIN in about 2500hrs (2500hs flying time of the aircraft.

    We also have Mil8 (a Russian Helicopter - large twin engine 5 blades that we have two off) and a few years back was slinging a 20foot container (lifting it on a 200foot long piece of rope hanging under the helicopter) and facing in to the wind (like a fixed wing - best for taking off - more lift) in the hover and waiting for the breeze to come good (increase - therefore more lift) for the extra bit of transition lift (REF/B/) lift he needed. The russian crews are pretty good - shame about their paper work! (I try to work with them and guide them but they dont always understand)

    REF/A/
    Bell have a formula that you have to apply to certain components on the aircraft so that they are withdrawn from use after some many events. In this case the mast can only have so many torque events applied to it. Torque is a twisting load so as the load comes on, the power is applied to the base of the mast but the rotors on the top of the mast dont absorb that power instantly. for the RIN count in this application one uses the formula (landings x 1) + (lifts x 1) = RIN.
    RIN - Retirement Index Number.

    REF/B/
    Transition lift - you often see a helicotper dip its nose when starting to travel forward from the hover. when in teh hover all the forces are acting vertically but when its flying there are vector of forces and whilst transitioning from the hover to forward flight, it helps to have some extra lift. As well, when the helicopter is flying, there is more lift from the blades.
    There will be lots of info on the net about this and maybe others will chime in with some info.

    I may get round to posting some pics up later.

    Hay Ewe
  10. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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    Noooo they don't go all that smoothly. I've held a piece of a hydo tower in place for 15 minutes while the crew tried to make it fit. "up and inch, down an inch" I was thinking "an inch??? are you kidding me????. I'm 150 feet away in a machine that floating on air and you want inch by inch adjustments???:lol3 It felt like forever. That and the tower was over a hundred feet tall so the ground reference was a loooong way away. Eventually the crew realized that the piece was going to need to be modified on the ground, I was a bucket of sweat.

    Actually a bit of wind is a good thing. Completely calm not only makes the piece harder to lift but a constant breeze makes the whole process smoother. The machine sits more solidly and becomes more stable, but if its gusty, then the whole works becomes a fight and it may not be worth doing or even trying. Like everything, if you wait for the perfect conditions, you may be waiting for a long time, but if you screw it up, it can be very very bad.

    Mechanical issues....bad, you're right there.

    And and and thanks for the props, that's kind, but I'm just a humble servert, picking things up and putting them down. It's a living. :freaky
  11. Shadow10

    Shadow10 Been here awhile

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    Clarification - you need it translated to 'murican.
  12. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    Just doing the paper work for a mast change on one of our 407's.
    Rin'd out in 2038 hrs, it did 9000 slings and 5900 landings
    We didn't even get half the hours life out of it

    about normal for our 407 fleet

    (having a bitch trying to upload photos due connection) working on it

    Hay Ewe
  13. Vagabond_Explorer

    Vagabond_Explorer Relax_Unwind_Chill

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    This thread needs more pics.

    My 2 favourite European toys:

    [​IMG]
  14. emerson.biguns

    emerson.biguns All idiot, no savant

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    [​IMG]




    .
  15. GSPeP

    GSPeP Long timer

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    More pictures ....

    At the Fairford Airshow 2007 (UK)

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
  16. GSPeP

    GSPeP Long timer

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    Some more Fairford 2007

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  17. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius 1.5 Finger Discount

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    Now that is cool!

    I'd like to see one of those at an airshow.
  18. GSPeP

    GSPeP Long timer

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    This one was from the Czech Republic.

    They always have some special visitors at the Fairford Airshow ( www.airtattoo.com )
  19. Beto

    Beto RustyGasket

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  20. Vagabond_Explorer

    Vagabond_Explorer Relax_Unwind_Chill

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    That is a great shot of the 407. My 2nd fave machine.

    I think the 407 and the B3 are the two most fun and most powerful single engine light category helicopters around. The B3 is better all round IMHO because it has a better cabin (for passengers) and no stupid broom cupboard and 2 separate compartments.

    It'd be great if someone came up with an STC to remove that broom cupboard!