Hi-Viz believer or non believer?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Dusty1013, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Been here awhile

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    I agree with those who say "look like a cop".

    A white BMW, black jacket and a white helmet has certainly worked for me. Sometimes it's a little OTT and the car drivers overreact and actually swerve out of the way when they see me coming (what's the American term - lining it?).

    I always give a wave in thanks. I like the European "stick your foot out for thanks" method - the first time I did it I wasn't ready for the wind-force on my waving leg. Since we drive on the other side of the road here in the UK, it's usual to wave your left hand in thanks as you wizz past.
    #81
  2. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    While there is a segment of the riding community that puts fashion and image above all else, in general black gear is simply practical as it doesn't show road grime which builds up quickly, especially if you're a daily rider, and typically riding gear can't just be thrown in a washing machine. I do have some high-viz gear but rarely use it for that reason.
    That it doesn't seem to make any real difference is a secondary consideration, not a justification to not use it. Personally, I prefer additional lighting as it works better in more conditions than high-viz
    #82
  3. GlennR

    GlennR Playin' in the Fire

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    Hi-vis SCREAMS to be seen.

    I can see hunters' hi-vis clothes from over a mile away across valleys when riding in the woods. They POP out and are almost impossible to miss.

    On the road I see riders wearing hi-vis gear without even looking for them. They are 100X more visible than everything else, in heavy traffic, or in the fog, dusk or dawn. I see them even when I'd been daydreaming or was distracted.

    Lights are directional. You only notice them if they're facing you. But hi-vis vests & helmets can be seen from all directions.

    Being seen improves the odds in your favor. That's a smart thing to do.
    #83
  4. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I agree, but they have to be able to see you in the first place.

    I'm on the road 8 to 10 hours a day as a city P&D driver which given me ample opportunity to observe what works.
    I'm not saying high-viz doesn't have any benefit, but you don't need to be seen a long way off, you need to be seen by those in close proximity to you. Many riders I see have lousy roadcraft, riding in blind spots, tailgating, or poor lane positioning that makes visibility enhancements pointless. If they can't see you, they won't see you.

    There's two reasons I prefer lighting, first is it will cast a "light cloud" in poor visibility conditions such as darkness, rain, fog, and snow. Second is the greatest threat is left turners where "directional" lighting is the most effective, and high-viz the least.

    Not believing is different than not using.
    #84
  5. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    [​IMG]
    #85
  6. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    That pic doesn't show the optional "tacti-'stache".

    :lol3
    #86
  7. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Well.................

    My Ural does have the optional machine gun mount.........:evil

    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately they never offered the anti tank missile launcher for the civilian market.
    [​IMG]
    #87
  8. Arte

    Arte Pata de Perro

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    That's my riding survival style.... Always pretending that all the cages WANT to kill me...
    #88
  9. NERMagilla

    NERMagilla n00b

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    I wear it and feel like it is just one tool in the tool box, lights, loud horn, defensive riding, riding skill, all make it less likely that you will be squashed like a bug :lol3:lol3
    #89
  10. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Been here awhile

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    I reckon hi-viz gear can help a bit, but along with ATGATT, ABS, MSF, CBT, track day developed skills and the like, it is no panacea.

    People who think their superior gear and skills are their guardian angel deceive themselves. Don't rely on the senses of others to avoid you.

    Ride aware and to the conditions. It is your own attitude, senses, and common sense that will keep you out of trouble.
    #90
  11. smj

    smj Been here awhile

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    From my experience with bicycles out here - those folks who dress in dark, asphalt colored pant and jersey, on an asphalt colored bike with an asphalt colored helmet can really blend in and disappear from view during a quick glance. I have yet to miss seeing (edit - add seeing) a bicycle when they wear hi viz. Hunters wear camo to blend in to the woods... A biker (bicycle or motorcycle) that wants to wear what amounts to asphalt camo is kind of asking for it IMHO. That said, I agree that hi viz is not the prevent-all when it comes to getting run over. There is no substitute for other drivers being attentive.
    #91
  12. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    I wear Black for the most part. I have a Green and Black Belstaff Discovery and an Orange and Black Belstaff Adventure. Other than that all my gear is Black.

    I use lateral motion to have other road users take note of my presence.

    Do bright colors help? Sure In most instances they would help. An exception would be Alien Vomit Green in the Springtime foliage is like camouflage.

    I personally find bright colors distracting when I see the sleave in my line of sight or when reflected in my mirrors.

    An alert rider can easily be safe without hi-viz. :D
    #92
  13. simonm2211

    simonm2211 Adventurer

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    Like a few have mentioned, I noticed a difference in driver behavior when I started wearing hi-viz. Car drivers left a little more room, cutting in front was less frequent and there were fewer events of pulling out of side streets or left hand turns that caused hard braking.

    My theory is that in addition to being more visible, car drivers perceive hi-viz riders a little differently; there is probably a strong correlation between wearing hi-viz and other passive and active safety behaviors (wearing ATGATT, being aware of good positioning in traffic, etc.) and many of the negative stereotypes drivers associate with riders don't translate to hi-viz riders as strongly. I think I get a little more consideration.

    It's only one part of my plan to mitigate the risks but it's pretty high on that list.
    #93
  14. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Been here awhile

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    There is no substitute for a motorcyclist being attentive.
    #94
  15. steelerider

    steelerider Southafricanamerican

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    I've kept this picture for a number of years. In a sea of black, if you scan your eyes across the page, which colors pop out at you first? Notice the guy on the left? Where do your eyes instantly go to first?
    [​IMG]

    There's no doubt in my mind that high vis does make you more visible to surrounding drivers, and thus increases the chance they can see you.
    Which is better than them not seeing you.
    #95
  16. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    this has been my experience as well
    #96
  17. No False Enthusiasm

    No False Enthusiasm a quiet adventurer

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    The pedestal mount on the Ural can accept a light MG...

    I'm lookin' for a ring mounted M2 .50 cal...

    NFE
    #97
  18. scootrboi

    scootrboi Long timer

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    That yellow trike. Both my scooters are white (ivory) and the large unbroken areas of white make me quite visible. Feels that way, drivers seem to see me.[​IMG]
    #98
  19. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    One point that I haven't seen covered anywhere, if you wear hi-viz its my experience your far less likely to get picked on by the cops.

    Just the other day he had the speed gun on me and I'm well over the limit. He just smiled at what he thinks is some old pensioner as I go past and I wave back. If I'd of looked like a street racer or outlaw, no doubt I would have been $400 poorer.

    Happens to often not to be the case.
    #99
  20. Wraith Rider

    Wraith Rider Banned

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    What about ONE black rider in a sea of yellow?