Homemade Bread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by a1fa, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

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    nice pics!
    Bread is doing whatever it does for 12-18 hours. only thing there is no where in my house that is 70degrees so I wrapped the bowl and put it in the oven (off of course) to see if that helps keep it at a constant temp or as close as I can get this time of year. was a rush throw it together when I got home so I forgot the pics, will take some tomorrow when I see if it raised up or not :D
  2. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    Great. I'd love to see what it looks like tomorrow! Take some pictures of your process as you go along if you can.
  3. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    How do you feel about the pan o' hot water in the stove to keep the temps up for rising/proof/etc >?


    I've been leaving it in for the actual baking too, as my house induces nosebleeds with it's level of non-humidity.
  4. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    That's hard to answer without knowing the temperature, and what you're trying to achieve. We keep the bakery 75F year round, and our mixing window is 75-77. Generally, bread fermented in mid/high 70's is best for control and flavor. Just warm enough, but not too warm.

    Humidity in the oven is crucial for expansion of the final loaf. Without it, you get alot of busting out all over, and you won't achieve correct volume. I don't have much experience baking at home unfortunately. Any humidity you can get into the oven in the first 15min or so would be a good thing!

    The no-knead method as well as Chad Robertsons method described in Tartine use a covered dutch oven. That seems like a great technique to me. What is going to happen is all the moisture being driven off from baking will be trapped in the pot, and steam the bread. You'll need to take top off towards the end of the bake to drive off that moisture so you get a crust, and it obviously only works for round loaves.
  5. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    In the house, generally around 70. The heat pump does pretty well at keeping that within a degree or three. Differences in rise time outside of the oven and inside with a pan of hot water is about 2:1. That's for a double volume.

    My oven should be shot and then buried at sea. It's a travesty.

    I don't have a dutch anything at the moment. I'll give it a try once I do though. I'm going to try some dark bread this weekend.
  6. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

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    my house is about 62-66, what can I say I am too cheap to heat the place. :hide

    will snap a pic when I remove the wrap this evening, got to dig out the big dish with lid for this one. But you could always use foil I imagine just making sure it is tight around the pot.
  7. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    I live in an apt, and it's surprisingly well insulated. I keep it about 65 in the summers, usually for less than $50(us) a month.

    It seems to double in winter no matter what I do, so I go ahead and jack it up. :lol3
  8. MikeFly

    MikeFly Adventurer

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    That is a great shot!:clap

  9. MikeFly

    MikeFly Adventurer

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    If you need a warmer spot to rise, put it in the oven and turn the light on inside. You may need to crack the door open a bit to keep the heat down. My oven has a 40w bulb in it that really throws off some heat.

  10. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

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    Ok, my latest attempt based on my 'simplified' recipe was bust. It made one heck of a good doorstop for the rest of the winter.

    I read the reviews on "bread alone" and then went to the library and read some of it and was not encouraged.

    Some more research garnered huge support for this one..
    [​IMG]

    It was out but I reserved it when it returns.

    Jim.. you mention fermentation, moist dough, and dutch ovens (for those of us that don't have humidity controlled bakery ovens).

    Can you share a recipe for basic crusty aromatic italian peasant bread?

    And my aplogies in advance to you for ever suggesting that this was so damn easy. I must have just gotten really lucky the first time.
  11. huzar

    huzar Pastor of Muppets

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    My second attempt at no-knead bread, after a long hiatus:
    [​IMG]
    Verdict: Not bad. Decent crust, if a little thin. Nice flavor, good crumb. Certainly a huge improvement over the first one that I baked on Tuesday night, which could be used for a hockey puck. I think I used rye flour in that one, and did not add enough water.

    On this one, the dough came out a little too sticky... I'll have to try a tad less water next time around. Also, for some reason the top crust has a very glossy look to it :scratch Finally, and this has been true of all of my breads baked in a dutch oven, none of them seem to rise very much or exhibit much oven spring. I'm not sure why that is -- I certainly would like them to have a slightly less flattened shape.
  12. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    I don't know anything about that book. Sorry.

    I should note that I don't have any experience with the dutch oven, other than that one time I plopped some dough into it and was impressed. Both of the bakers (unlike many, these two ARE bakers first, authors second-important distinction) recommend them, and in theory at least the concept is sound.

    Ideally, you'd use a pizza stone, thicker the better, preheat your oven as hot as it'll go for an hour and find a way to introduce steam. The dutch oven seems to address that. Keep in mind the dutch oven must be preheated as well, and a few minutes isn't good enough. Put it in your oven. Turn it on as hot as it'll go and forget about it for an hour.
  13. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    You might get a better crust if you remove the top for awhile. If you tried this, do it sooner. It'll allow the loaf to dry out a little and form the much sought after crust.

    Keep the water at its current level, and add a fold like in that video. You'll be amazed at the difference. I believe in adding as much water as possible. It just gets a little sloppier, but a fold solves that and makes better bread, with better volume. As for the volume issue, it could be a not pre heated dutch oven, or lack of strength in the dough. The strength goes back to the folding. Such a simple process, but you will be surprised at the result.
  14. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

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    So after working a 12 hour day I got home and thought damn, I have dough rising! :baldy
    so screw it I popped the wrap off and took a look, been on the raise for about 16hours.
    sorry in advance for crappy photo's was hard enough as I was tired but holding my camera with flour/dough hands was interesting too.
    [​IMG]
    Poured the dough (very sticky) onto the work table and dusted with flour then folded it like in the video above, wrapped in a floured towel for 10minutes or so.
    then plop into the 500 oven which had been warming with the pot for about 20 minutes.
    [​IMG]
    I forgot to set the timer :baldy this was "about" 30 minutes later (lids was on)
    [​IMG]
    then 15 more minutes with top off and.....
    [​IMG]

    not to shabby for first time ever!
    Not as holely? as I would like, bit dense. I think I didn't have it in long enough under cover or the pot was not hot enough to start with?
    anyway some warm bread and butter before bed :D
    [​IMG]
  15. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    You just proved to yourself and others that you can do it! That's a damn good looking loaf! You can be proud of yourself. It's hard to tell from the photo, but the dough may have been a little overfermented. That will greatly affect volume and what we call "hole structure".

    I would advise doing the same thing you did, but cut an hr. or two out of the process. Since you were able to look at the bread at 12hrs., next time do a fold at the 12 hr. mark. Give it another hr. then proceed as you did this time. I bet you'll get closer to what you're looking for. You'll start to get a feel for the dough, and what it needs. Maybe, it'll need another fold at the 13 hr. mark? Maybe, it'll be ready to shape? Keep in mind all the various temperatures of the dough and air, since that will greatly affect process.

    Awesome job:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap

    EDIT: I misread your post. If you can get to it sooner than the 16hr. mark, that'd probably good. Above advice applies. If not, you can control it with temperature. Warmer and it's going to ferment faster. Cooler, it'll ferment slower.
    Good job!
  16. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

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    It was bubbling a touch when I looked in under the wrap so that makes sense. Didn't have that option this time due to being late at work, but will give your suggestions a try and see what happens.
    Was hoping to use this dough for pizza dough too it I can get that to work.
  17. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    I'm very impressed.

    And continued thanks Jim for the interest in this thread.
  18. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    Yeah, thanks Jim. It really is great to have a pro giving us tips. :thumb

    Here's my first attempt at the same bread about a month ago.

    [​IMG]
  19. huzar

    huzar Pastor of Muppets

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    So the standard no-knead directions recommend a secondary rise of 2 hours after folding... seems like you dispensed with that. I like the shape of the loaf, which is a problem for me. Since I let mine rest for 2 hours after the fold and the dough is a little on the runny side, it looses all shape...:cry

    Your bread looks great :clap
  20. huzar

    huzar Pastor of Muppets

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    Yeah, on a good day, this is what mine used look like... Pilot, what is the cross-section of your bread?