Honda 305 Superhawk

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by jeep44, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,099
    Location:
    Canton,Michigan
    I've had maybe 20 bikes over the years-all British or American. This is the first Japanese bike I've ever had. A friend had it, and wanted to sell it. I saw how original it was, and decided to do a "rescue"-otherwise, some kid might have made a "Cafe Racer" or a Bobber out of it. It has 8000 miles on it, and it's been sitting in a garage since 1974. All the side covers and air cleaners are there,too-just in a milk crate. I won't be able to do much to this until the snow is gone, but I'm looking forward to riding it. Right now I'm pretty sure it's a 1966 (the PO is still looking for the title)

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Good score. I was 16 in 1968 when I started out on a new CB160. Then, and still, I feel that the 305 Super Hawk is the most classic of the Hondas during that period when Honda was carving out its own place in the US market. It just looked "right" and sounded "right".
    #2
  3. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    way over yonder in the minor key
    congrats!

    certainly a giggle-fest of a bike.

    [​IMG]
    #3
  4. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    I'm probably not going to have so many lights on my bike when it's done........:lol3
    #4
  5. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Cin City, OH
    My first bike, red, bought new in '65. Great bike, biggest Japanese bike at the time, and the equal of 500cc Triumphs, maybe even a little faster. It would do about a 100, which is about what a Bonneville would do at that time. The baffles were held in with just a bolt, so naturally they came out.

    Electric start was huge back then, as was the OHC. High revs for the time.

    Good luck with it, keep us posted. :clap
    #5
  6. Tripletreat

    Tripletreat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    601
    Location:
    Boise, Idaho
    My first bike was a CB77 - I believe it was a 1963. I agree that they were and are great bikes. It always seemed to me that when Honda brought out the 350s, they were a big step backward as far as style. The Superhawks are just beautiful.
    If you get into the engine, be sure to replace the valve springs. They were of questionable quality and allow the valves to float before you ever get the engine wound up to redline.
    I put Bates reverse cone megaphones on mine back in the day. They earned me my first ticket from the CHP! :lol3
    Lovely sound though....
    #6
  7. Turbodog1000

    Turbodog1000 Vintage Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    40
    Location:
    NE Indy
    Great find! I am currently restoring a 1964 CB77 Superhawk. I got it running last spring and rode all last summer. These are a popular bike to restore, lots of parts and good info on the net & Ebay.

    Honda305.com is a great for advice, those guys really know this bike.
    #7
  8. PJay

    PJay Any bike, anywhere

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    808
    Location:
    Russell, New Zealand
    Still have my CB77 - restored it during the 1980s, and it needs restoration again now.

    It is the model I lusted after when I first got into motorcycling in the early to mid 1960s, and mine the last of my bikes I'd ever sell.

    To my mind, their only real fault is that they need a 6-spd gearbox - the spread of the 4 makes them pant a bit now and then.

    One of its shedmates is a Superhawk, too: a 2006 VTR1000.
    #8
  9. JackHinds

    JackHinds Adventurer

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    Jan 7, 2014
    Oddometer:
    25
    Location:
    Guelph, Ontario
    Good catch! That thing looks amazing.

    And though I think Cafe Racers have their place, it would be a shame to see it stripped down and cut up.
    #9
  10. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    I like a lot of Cafe Racers,too, but when something like this has survived basically unmolested for so long, I want to see it preserved as it is.
    #10
  11. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    backwoods Alabama
    Mid-to-late '60's. If you had a CB 160 you were Top Dog. A 305 Hawk, you were gawd. They seemed just HUGE back then. Nowadays, they look like teeny-tiny, almost dainty, bikes.

    How times have changed...

    --Bill
    #11
  12. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    They ARE little bikes. I'm not very big myself, so I look just fine on it. As I get older, I think it is better to ride a small, light bike-I don't want to be one of these old guys trying to hold up a 1000 pound motorcycle.
    #12
  13. luckychucky

    luckychucky Long timer

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    Mar 6, 2011
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    SE Missouri
    That describes it pretty good, I notice it has a different front fender than the one with all the lights. I wonder if it's the same year, but just a different model? Your fender looks more dual purpose. Looks a lot like the front fender on my 69 Yamaha Trail Master. Good score! Have fun.
    #13
  14. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    The front fender on the light show bike looks like it might have come off a 305 Dream model, totally different bike.
    #14
  15. RustyStuff

    RustyStuff Been here awhile

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    Jan 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    963
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    Crakima,Wa
    The Light bike is a Honda Dream, with the funny leading link forks. Dreams were the commuter/touring bike, with a single carb and mild tuneing for fuel economy. The superhawk /Hawks had twin carbs,Hotter tuning, different gearing IIrc, and was the Sports bike.
    #15
  16. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    Another couple of goodies that came with the bike-It looks like the toolkit is pretty much complete-maybe I'm missing a small open-end wrench?

    [​IMG]
    #16
  17. Motomochila

    Motomochila Mad Scientist

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    Sep 30, 2007
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    Location:
    N 34 22.573' W 118 34.328'
    My newest addition. Shipped from Viet Nam in 1969 and left in boxes until 2013. I bought this at the Mid America Auction in Vegas last month. It will be converted to a racer sometime within the next six months..as parts begin to show up. Many parts here will be available as I start discarding everything. First addition: Aluminum tank and cafe seat pan.
    [​IMG]
    #17
  18. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    I could use the chain guard....:lol3
    #18
  19. Motomochila

    Motomochila Mad Scientist

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    I'll keep you in the loop as I start tearing apart next month. I may have more than one in the box of spares. Too many to inventory as of yet.
    #19
  20. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Yeah, the frames and forks on Dreams were also pressed steel, as opposed to steel tubing on the Superhawks. I know some like the Dreams, but they never did anything for me, actually I really didn't like the looks at all. :rofl
    #20