Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by JimmieA, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. MookieBlaylock

    MookieBlaylock Long timer

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    i read a review in some euro magazine of the versys,650 wee and the 700. The 700 has nice low torque but that's it, the other 2 leave it in the dust after the midrange. The 500 obviously even less. They LOOK like nice bikes, seems a shame honda doesn't deliver at least one version with actual performance beyond stellar fuel economy but such is honda.
    #81
  2. robert110411

    robert110411 Been here awhile

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    I actually came in at midnight from a gunnery range and fired up my computer so that I could see the new Honda's.

    I think there is a whole lot of point missing going on around here. Honda is a very big company with big resources. Honda is still a business,

    Unfortunately it isn't the 70's where showrooms are packed with new models of all kinds. I remember going into a showroom and seeing MR's, CR's, SL's, XL's and all sorts of other bikes. That's not the case today. Why? Because the market simply doesn't support it.

    Honda is a BUSINESS. It's main goal is to build what sells. It costs money to import a new bike and there needs to be some expectation that the cost will be recovered. The only way the cost is recovered? Is by selling bikes.

    Anyone remember all the buzz around the Super Tenere? well, in pretty big part of the country there are leftover Super 10's. The dealer that my son goes to sold one at cost and the other it sold to another dealer in hopes they could move it. Another dealer nearby has one leftover marked down 3K.

    NC 700's on the other hand are moving off showroom floors. I looked at one yesterday as it's one of the bikes my son is considering trading his V-Star 650 on. The same dealer who basically gave away his Super 10's has sold every NC 700 he can get his hands on.

    Honda is making a bold shift to world market, shared technology products that provide a level of competence and reliability....at a price point. Sound familiar? It should. it's the model that made Honda in the 70's.

    So back to the CB 500X. It's sound basic transportation that isn't locked into any one basic mold. It's not really a sport bike and it's not really and adventure bike. It's a bike that can probably do a whole bunch of things well enough be fun.

    It's also the kind of bike that may/will lure new riders to the sport. That's probably the most important part. sales equals revenue. Revenue equals a little freedom of maneuver. It's easier to fund developing a cool new real adventure bike when the coffers are full with revenue from CB500X's and NC 700's.

    It may actually be refreshing to walk into a dealer and see more than one row of sport bikes and one row of cruisers and not much else.

    On a side note? That really cool CB 1100 that some many people said they would buy if Honda imported it? Wanna bet it dies off after two model years? We NEVER buy what we beg for in sufficient enough numbers to support bringing them here.....case in point, Super 10.

    By the way. I didn't trade my GSX on a Vee to go off roading. I traded because I wanted something less effected by road quality that could go down 3 miles of dirt or gravel road I encounter fairly regularly on my rides. Since then I've found myself actually planning rides that end up going down dirt and gravel roads to see things my GSX wouldn't have taken me to see.

    It still isn't a dirt bike. and on some level I'm betting 90% of adventure ikes get used the same way.....so getting all worked up because Honda calls the NC or CB an Adventure bike? Is silly. It will be a fine adventure bike to lots of people. And hopefully enough people to finance some other cool bikes.
    #82
  3. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    Lighten up .... :huh

    This is an internet forum, not the Economist. I suppose an 80cc mx'er has got to be called a youth motorcycle instead of "kids bike" too, eh?

    My point was pretty much the same as yours, that it'll be a fine adv bike if you take into account its limitations. Most upright geometry street bikes will handle quite rough terrain, but your speed cannot be nearly as high. That much said, if the rider & gear is light, that can make a big difference as well. For a 105 to 135lbs "person", that bike would probably do as well as any vStrom with 200lb rider. The 2" less travel and 17" front won't be as much an impediment for a lighter rider w/less gear.

    Sorry that my informal language offended you.
    #83
  4. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    Very good post :freaky
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  5. Dranrab Luap

    Dranrab Luap E-Tarded Super Moderator

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    Yes it was!
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  6. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    MCN (UK) says the 500s looked very good in person, especially considering the price point.

    The rumour is £4000 in the UK, which is frankly astonishing if true, as a Ninja 250 will set you back £4299.
    #86
  7. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

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    Anyone know what the rev limit is on the CB500X? I rode a NC700 and the gas mileage was great (72mpg with WFO) but passing as a chore with hitting the rev limiter just when it was waking up.

    Maybe I am being like Goldilocks - The CBR250 is too small (but I want one) and my 929Fireblade is too big for my commute. I like a standard or a sportbike so the "Adventure" bike seems to be the new "standard" moniker. Marketing...

    If you know the rev limit, thanks for your help!
    #87
  8. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

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    You took the words right out of my mouth. Precisely what I'm looking for.

    The other thing that Yamaha did right with the Tenere is putting the 270 deg crank in their parallel twin. It seems like Honda and Kawi don't get that buzzy parallel twins with 360 or worse 180 degree cranks are not pleasing to ride. There is a reason why people like V-twins.

    I am excited to see more interest and offerings like the CB500X, I just hope they give some attention to the factors that separate a really fun and interesting bike with one that is just Ho-Hum to ride. It doesn't mean it needs big power, but it needs good feel with power/torque in the right places. It needs decent suspension, brakes, and handling. And it needs to have some attractive styling (Kawasaki are you listening???).

    I honestly think Triumph could produce an even smaller 675 sized Tiger (and hopefully commensurately lighter) that could be successful. Put that puppy smack in the face of the Vstrom 650 and Versys 650.
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  9. straightrod

    straightrod Long timer

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    ^ " I honestly think Triumph could produce an even smaller 675 sized Tiger (and hopefully commensurately lighter) that could be successful. Put that puppy smack in the face of the Vstrom 650 and Versys 650."

    +1 on that and I would not be surprised to see Triumph do it in the near future.
    #89
  10. Ham

    Ham Been here awhile

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    Every once in awhile I have to stop and pinch myself when I read some of the comments about the NC700X....I am left wondering if some people who say they have rode one really did.

    Now a guy riding a FIrehawk929....I can understand if he thinks passing with the NC700 is slow...but you should take that in considerations when you test rode.

    Vibration....what vibration...I found the S10 was way rougher all around, however I understand that engine gets smoother with time.

    If there is anything that stands out about the NC 700 it is its smoothness, its quietness, its low COG, its total lack of any vibration. Even the Honda owner told me to be careful not to test ride it first as it will totally spoil me for just how smooth a bike should run. He was dead on.

    I found it plenty fast, but then again, I understand it isn't a sport bike or a 1200 zipper, its a 700 tuned for torque.

    It just seems to me people trying to criticize it are really reaching. It shows me Honda has again made something people just haven't experienced before...a paradigm shift for previous motorcycle riders, but not newbies.
    #90
  11. Gryphon12

    Gryphon12 Long timer

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    Truimph originally made the smaller Tiger an 800cc motor to gain some torque, which is highly valued in the ADV market segment and in particular, on the off-road side of the ADV equation. The 675cc motor makes great specific horsepower, but is a high rpm, low specific torque motor. You could change the cams and re-time the motor, but the gains aren't all that great. Considering the increase in weight of the bike going from Street Triple (sport) to Tiger (ADV) trim was going to be significant, it made more sense to go to 800cc.

    I think we'll see a 675cc Sprint SPORT-tourer before we see a 675cc Tiger Cub.

    The potential game changer waiting in the wings is what Yamaha chooses to do with their new Triple engine(s). Personally, I believe that twins make better ADV bikes (emphasis on torque), while Triples make better street bikes (emphasis on power), but with more character that the I-4 engines. Time will tell.
    #91
  12. dduelin

    dduelin Amazing grace how sweet the sound....

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    I think I read it was 8000 or 8500.
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  13. dduelin

    dduelin Amazing grace how sweet the sound....

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    I think a lot of them have only read one or two pages of the motorcycle book and don't know any different. Many of them probably started out on inline fours and only know rev happy motors. To someone of that experience it would feel unnatural to shift at 5 or 6000 rpm and only have 50 hp on tap. A recurring theme is having to shift just when it gets "fun". Age might have something to do with as well. Riders of a certain age came up through the small displacement classes and the baddest bike on the block had 750 cc and 67 horsepower while the rest of us made do and rode everywhere on 35 hp 350s if we were lucky. Another thought is that many young riders have never ridden anemic V twins with gobs of torque and little horsepower that are all done at 5000. I think it is great the new NC forums are filling with both new riders and experienced riders - the bike has wide appeal.
    #93
  14. mrsteve

    mrsteve Adventurer

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    I don't care about taking it off road, but really like the riding position.

    I'm thinking of a 500X or 700X as a commuter. Has anyone heard reliable hp/torque numbers for the 500?

    I recall reading somewhere that there wouldn't be much of a HP difference between the 500 and 700, so with the weight difference I guess torque will be meaningful.

    Then again, I might get impatent and just get the 700 :D.

    #94
  15. Wenty

    Wenty Adventurer

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    I like it..... Looks like a nice commuter ride for work. :D
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  16. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    I've heard 30ft/lb torque. I think you'd need to spin the motor. My old CB500 had 57bhp/34ftlb torque.

    I would hope that Honda built some character into the power delivery, as they did with the 700X. Then again, it might be as bland as possible to attract new riders.

    It's the projected price that has me interested; base bike for around £4000 (ABS as standard), when an ABS-equipped Versys or DL650 is closer to £7000.
    #96
  17. mike884

    mike884 Been here awhile

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    ^^^ Not going to lie, but this is pretty much why I really like my Vstrom. :D
    #97
  18. ThatVoodoo

    ThatVoodoo n00b

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    You sir, are a wise one. It's refreshing to know that some people can see the forest even when the trees are blocking their view. :D

    I put 35,000 miles on a Suzuki V-Strom 650 and other than the occasional gravel road it was all pavement... I have a proper dirtbike for that purpose. ;)

    I have been away from pavement riding for awhile and this new 500 X adventure bike is really popping my pistons. It is so much nice bike for such little money! I cannot find any ride reviews yet, can't wait.
    #98
  19. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

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    Good points. The NC700 I had was a weekend rental. I put over 900 miles on it. Overall a good bike. Smooth and narrow feeling. A bit too expensive for me for what I want to use it for. If the cb500 comes in close to price as the cbr250 and has a 8500 rev limit (like the early 80s bikes I learned to ride on) I bet it would fell "right" to me and that "right" feeling is what makes folks pull the purchase trigger.
    #99
  20. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer

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    Question all you want, but the NC I rode did not have a "total lack of any vibration". It wasn't bad. On par with my r100, maybe a little different frequency, not enough to bother me, but it was there. I thought the Bonneville I rode was smoother.