Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by JimmieA, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    I'll keep it street legal for now. Don't yet know I'll like it. I'm more inclined to do a Stage 1 RR mod and put on TKC 80s. When I got it home I took the bashed fender off and inspected the radiator. It was intact, so I charged the battery, checked the fuel and oil and it cranked right up. Impressed.
  2. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    Please have that frame checked. From the pic, it looks like the head tube is slightly twisted to the right side.
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  3. DaveNYrider

    DaveNYrider Adventurer

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    Congrats i got the same bike 2015 leftover last dec..... been enjoying it allot, really haven't ridden my harley as much since I got it....

    Attached Files:

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  4. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Good eyes you have to see such thing from a picture. ;-) Pun intended, don't take it seriously.

    I believe he already wrote that the forks are bent. I've repaired a few front damaged cb-s and yet to find one with a bent frame. The fork stanchions are fairly weak and act as a "programmed crumpling zone" in a way they bend and break before transmitting damage to the frame neck.
    In case that the paint has not cracked on the welds on the frame neck, I would not even check further.
    However the steering bearings are most probably gone - even if they don't feel so. I would use the opportunity and change them to all balls tapered bearings once the front is pulled.
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  5. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    I understood that the forks were bent. Every time I have repaired a bike with the forks bent like that and the handlebars in the position those are in, the head tube ended up being twisted. I'm not sure the powder coat on these frames would crack if it is twisted. It seems pretty flexible.
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  6. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Has anyone had ever measured weight of the swingarm? (Or other individual components for that matter)
    I want to run some calculations for revalving a rear shock for the CB, but I'd need to collect the total unsprung weight or the rear assembly.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  7. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    when I get the forks built and the bodywork off I'll have a good look at the frame and neck/bearings. As I can see so far the frame looks to be ok. Correct in assuming the forks are the crumple zone. My other bike, a Yamaha FZ1, had the same damage, actually a harder hit, and the forks were toast. They rest of the bike was ok.
  8. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    Great minds you know... BTW, what tail bag are you using? Using a tank bag, but need more space, and though I have an Emgo tail box in the garage, it is a large one, and may not look right on the bike... tp
  9. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    Post some pics when you get it where you like it... Just got back from my first ride. A bit windy, but very stable and flickable at all speeds. I believe it would be a good real DS mount, modded properly. tp
  10. DaMonk45

    DaMonk45 I B Da Monk

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    So this guy who is having issues does not get left my the noob with the crashed bike.

    I would get a clutch puller and give that a try. You should be able to just get it started and work it slowly out.
    I would give a 3 finger puller a try and it might get it lose.
  11. scharfg

    scharfg Been here awhile

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    Update: clutch pack removal problem.

    Checked in with Honda and they don't understand it either, it should just pull off. Problem might be related the excessive heat generated when I was overworking the clutch and having a aluminum inner basket mated with a steel shaft, so it is sticking.

    They suggested I apply some heat (propane torch/heat gun) around the steel shaft splines and some WD40 to the splines to see if that will loosen it.

    It had better, as a replacement inner clutch basket is ~$370CND!!

    Wish me luck....
  12. DaveNYrider

    DaveNYrider Adventurer

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  13. gehart

    gehart Been here awhile

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    Those of you who run Shinko 705's what tire pressure do yo run for general purpose road riding.
  14. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    Thanks... Saw it and the 1060ST larger bag too. Looked at others, but the Nelson Rigg products are real quality. Been using a single set of Spirit 50 saddlebags for seven years on several bikes, but found they only work as throw overs on the 500X, and that looks cheesy to me. tp
  15. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Been here awhile

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    i usually put anywhere from 40,000 to 70,000km a year on my bike depending on work, weather, trips, etc,etc. so 45,000km a year is actually a little low for me, but that photo was taken in end of may/ start of summer so im at about 110,000km as of 1 min ago. ill probably put another 10,000km by new years so 120,000km end of year. now i built my crf500l in july 2015 so that means that YTD average per year is about 50,000km.

    you have to remember i also ride year-round,24/7. all through winter too here in Calgary, regardless of temperature, as long as the roads are dry and its not a blizzard im out with the bike. i also commute to work with my bike, which eats up alot of mileage.


    now i usually have two bikes in the garage to help distribute mileage, but for the last 4 years all ive had was the crf250L ---> crf500L, and i will admit im putting way to many Km on it. the crf250L frame has almost 250,000km on it while the crf500L (the 500 twin engine) has almost 110,000km (122,000km if you count the 12,000km original miles of the engine)


    just to clarify
    90,000km was what i put on the 500 twin engine since i built it in that photo, 102,000km if you count the original engine mileage. (102,000km when that photo was taken). as posted above im sitting at just about 110,000km right now (122,000km total engine mileage)



    as for the topic at hand about sprocket wear and such.

    i clean and lube my chain religiously.
    as most know, you can ruin a new chain within couple thousand Km if you dont clean and lube it after off-roading, especially if mud was involved.


    the 500twin with its 180* firing interval produces a very smooth power output, this is very good news for tires and for chains as there is no impact force (impact forces accelerate wear)

    however ,
    my bike also weighs ~90lb less then a cb500x, and im also running super tall gearing of 15t front and 38T rear. on top of that my rear tire/wheel is significantly taller then the cb500x.

    the cb500x revs at 6,500rpm @120km/hr ( someone please correct me if im wrong here) GPS speed/Actual speed, not speedometer speed which we all know indicates higher speed/incorrect speed.

    my crf500L revs at about 5,000rpm @ 120km/hr.

    so effectively my chain is experiencing far less wear then a stock cb500x due to rotation and HP needed to move me.


    now
    i normally replace a chain every year because usually the salt from winter riding destroys the chain, also i do alot of wheelies so my chain stretches out after about a year. however the sprocket (both front and rear) are gonna last at least 2-3 years based off what i can see right now. thats at least 100,000km before replacement is required. i know that seams like alot but its what ive observed. :dunno


    my friend owns a cb500x and hes put almost 50,000km on it and the front sprocket is in very good shape, he will probably make it to 100,000km on stock sprockets. not the chain tho, as he also rides in the winter with me lol.
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  16. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Been here awhile

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    as a final note.

    you really cant talk about chain/sprocket wear ,brake wear, or tire wear for that matter because everyone is different.

    everyone rides differently.

    everyone cleans/ does maintenance differently.

    everyone runs different tire pressure.

    everyone does maintenance at different mileage.


    point is its a very hard topic to discuss scientifically. when i had my 2007 yamaha R1 i would get 9,000km out of a rear tire while others were getting only 4,000km........ but at the same time if i took my bike and rode it like i stole it, same tire net me 2,000km........ vastly different outcomes, same rider, same tires, same bike.........



    the one thing i agree on (we all agree on) is the cb500x is one hell of a durable machine, built to last long and cheap to own. one of the main reasons i used the 500twin in my crf500L.
  17. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Michael,
    Thanks for clarifying the chain and sprocket wear issue.
    Also I believe by now you have one of the highest mileage 500x engines (if not the highest).
    Impressive. And thank you for sharing.
    michaelkozera likes this.
  18. Tod.

    Tod. Old, but up for it

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    Clutch pack.
    To gently shock it, apply a pulling pressure to the clutch and at the same time hit the drive shaft with a hide or wood mallet. You may want to put the mainshaft nut back on but don't tighten it fully home. Then you're hitting the nut and not going to damage the threads. Don't use a propane torch if you can help it. But perhaps a heat gun. I fear you may set fire to something. And don't be too liberal with the heat gun either, if your quite a nooby to spannering.
  19. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    Help me understand the front suspension and its upgrading. Im a total noob on the bike but have rebuilt forks before. I understand the OEM forks are junk, with a weak progressive spring and very long spacer. Im trying to understand how the X has a longer fork travel than the other Cb500s. Is it because of the spacer is longer in the other Cbs? Or are the fork tubes longer in general? I watched a guy on youtube rebuild his forks with the RR3 kit and he got a height difference of 2 inches and increased the fork travel. How? Is it the spring, which is longer, and doesn't use the plastic spacer? Or is the fork rod in the shock longer?

    If I were to upgrade the spring to a linear spring (instead of the progressive) that is about 1.5 inches longer and shorten the spacer to make it the same length as OEM, would I get more fork travel?
  20. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    On damper rod forks, the lenght of the damper rod sets the possible travel. Changing that enables longer stroke of the fork. In case one installs longer spring, spacer has to be cut, but this only will not change fork travel.
    To my understanding the stanchion (the chrome tube) length is the same on all cb500 (R/F/X) bikes.
    The RR kit has additional benefit, of providing much better damping characteristics than the cheap stock unit.

    There are other upgrade possibilities than RR, but it has a very good value/price - and easy to install.
    No-Fret and JMo (& piglet) like this.