Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by JimmieA, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    Need a front wheel. My salvage rebuild was hit in the front and the forks are done. Rotor was warped and replaced, but the wheel wobble is still there. Rotor is rubbing on the brake pads and caliper, far more then spec. So I need a front wheel. Anyone out there with a RR3 build and have the front wheel they don't need? Dave
  2. playinatwork

    playinatwork Been here awhile

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    Dave, you might want to check the axle, it might be bent instead of the wheel.
  3. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    Beat me to it by a minute.
  4. Sunflash

    Sunflash Been here awhile

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    I would probably sell my wheel set.

    Sent from my LG-H872 using Tapatalk
  5. Garde

    Garde Been here awhile

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    Dave, if you end up still needing the wheel, I have both the front and rear available - just the wheels and tires, nothing else (no rotors or cush hubs). Would be a fair bit to ship from western Washington. I also have the ABS ring from the front OEM wheel, since I had to get the fitted one from Rally Raid for the 19" conversion.
    Mustang28027 likes this.
  6. playinatwork

    playinatwork Been here awhile

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    Aren't these wheels cast? Can you bend cast without breaking it?
  7. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    Yes and yes to a point they can be bent back. Places that repair wheels often heat them and apply pressure and allow them to cool naturally, at least that's how a local place used to do them.
  8. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    When I've studied as a motorcycle mechanic I've learnt how to repair cast wheels. Certain amount of damage can be repaired by cold forming (or in fact re-forming). Beyond a certain pint it is not feasible though. These cases one should anneal the AL material (practically soften ot by heating over the eutectic temperature, and cool it down within a few seconds e.g. by submerging in boiling water) first, then do the forming, and at the end do artificial aging in a heat chamber to get them back to the desired hardness.
    In the ebay era it usually doesn't worth it tho. Only on very difficult to find parts.
    ben2go likes this.
  9. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    "Dave, you might want to check the axle, it might be bent instead of the wheel."

    Actually, you are correct on that , too. The axle does have a slight bend to it. I'm going to get another ( ebay is making money off me!) and see how it does. Then I'll see if I need the wheel. The wheel does have a bump in the left side of the wheel, where the bead of the tire is. But it is not that bad. I'll do this piecemeal, I guess.
  10. Mustang28027

    Mustang28027 Been here awhile

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    Here's a pic of the wheel.

    Replace? I

    Attached Files:

  11. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    More than one bump... :D
  12. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Yup at the minimum two. In case you cannot get it repaired, I'd replace it.
  13. DaMonk45

    DaMonk45 I B Da Monk

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    one, maybe try and fix
    two, get a new one
  14. Heavy

    Heavy Been here awhile

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    um...at the risk of sounding simplistic...isn't the axle fixed beteeen the forks? If the axle was bent, it would make the wheel difficult to align, not wobble. Right?
    Even Madder Matt and Bultaco206 like this.
  15. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    If it's bent enough, yes. A slight bend or bow may not make it to difficult to mount the wheel. The fork lowers can turn to line up and the inner bearing spacer can offset to compensate for some bend or bow.
  16. Deltron

    Deltron Adventurer

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    Hey everyone, I currently have a drz400s and am looking for a bike that is still capable of forest/fire roads and some smaller trails at not a racing pace and a bike that could still handle the highway comfortably cruising at around 80mph. How does the 500x compare in stock form I have been reading about the rally raid set up but I don't think I would be in a position to drop so much money on the bike anytime soon. Will the 500x stock maybe with a better bashplate and handguards and decent tires be ok for my needs and maybe an improvement on the drz400s on cross country rides?
  17. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Deltron - the CB500X in stock form would feel extremely limited compared to your DRZ400 on rough terrain - no least as the DRZ has nearly 2.5 times the suspension travel of the CB, and masses more ground clearance.

    This is why Rally Raid developed their kit, to redress that balance to a great degree.

    However, if you mainly ride smoother fire-trails and logging roads, and take it easy on rougher trails - then yes, the standard* travel suspension on the CB can handle it, just make sure you fit a strong skid-plate/engine guard to protect the sump for if/when you hit something.

    [​IMG]

    *I would add that the stock suspension on the CB is pretty harsh and under-damped - certainly it will be like night and day compared to your DRZ. Don't forget that Rally Raid do offer a more affordable suspension kit (LEVEL 1 front & rear) if you don't want to increase the suspension travel, and stagger your upgrades as budget allows.

    One thing that is certain though, the CB will be a revelation once you hit the tarmac!

    Hope that helps...

    Jenny x
  18. MNimum

    MNimum Been here awhile

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    Hey Deltron,

    My other bike is a CRF250L. My CB500x is pure stock (the others may snicker) that I've put 12,000 mixed use miles on since acquiring last November. My perceptions relative to my CRF under the following circumstances are:

    - smooth dirt and light gravel is fun!
    - heavy washboard gravel makes me think I need a "manssierre" and might need to check the fillings in my teeth afterwards
    - deep gravel takes some practice but can be enjoyably steered with the throttle
    - deep loose sand? Me and the bike together are totally worthless in loose sand!
    - turning radius is wide (9+') so not as easy in tight situations; slaloming vegetation, rocks and obstacles is more difficult. U-turns on narrow forest roads ...
    - not much clearance so need care with curbs
    - bike "falls in" when doing tight, slow maneuvers but does pick itself up with a kick to the throttle
    - fair when taking pot holes and ruts slowly
    - a blast on smooth, curvy tarmac!
    - you feel all imperfections on roads with heavy cross seams, poor patching and imperfections; especially so in corners with wheels feeling like they'll bounce up and lose traction.
    - 80 mph = very easy; doesn't have any difficulty getting to 90.
    - easy to stand on the pegs at highway speeds for stretching, not good for long-duration offroad standing.

    I find I can easily spend 8 hours in the saddle if I keep my speeds 60 or less, but at 75+ with wind I become fatigued after just 2 hours due to buffeting.
    Grumblez likes this.
  19. Bultaco206

    Bultaco206 Back-to-back motos suck

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    I only rode my bike about 400 miles in stock trim before I installed my RR kit. However, those 400 miles were awful. I found the bike almost unrideable. The shock is what I'd consider passable. But the forks are a mess. I come from an off-road competition background and, at a minimum, some class of a working suspension is a requirement above all else. In stock form it doesn't work at all. I left my bike sit for a couple of weeks while my kit was in transit. In stock form I wanted nothing to do with the bike.

    That said; you have some options. Some more wallet-draining than others. But if you're at all even remotely considering riding one of these with a DRZ mentality then do it right and spend the money on the Level 3 RR kit. Anything short of that I just don't think you'll be happy at all.

    As for the highway part: With a Puig touring screen and a Palmer bracket this is the best-flowing highway bike I've ever had. It performs better than you might think. But you have to get the turbulence under control. At 75 mph on slab I'm not fatigued, and can ride with my visor open if I need to. However, with the stock gearing I do feel the buzziness after about an hour at that speed, which in itself can be fatiguing. I'd ride mine across the country and not think twice about it. But not regularly. I didn't buy it for that. And I haven't even talked about what the 19" front does to the highway manners of the bike. Even with Anakee Wilds it still makes it a better-handling bike than a stock machine.

    The above is just my own personal opinion. Many here do just fine on stock bikes. But with what you're wanting from the bike I think...scratch that...I know you'll be disappointed.

    [​IMG]
    Cruz likes this.
  20. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Been here awhile

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    This describes exactly the type of environment I ride my stock 500 and I find it great. Its no motocross bike but it handles everything I throw at it just fine. Sure there are better suspensions out there but for the riding you describe it will be just fine. Only changes I did make to the suspension was to add preload fork adjusters and set the front and rear sag, a very inexpensive addition that made a big difference. Also, on the highway with earplugs it is fantastic, no complaints. Not much passing power at that speed so just need to pick your spots. Even though a new suspension would make it that much better I cannot justify the costs, the extra cost would put it up into the price range of a good used mid-sized ADV bike.
    johnpma likes this.