Honda CM200T questions:

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by BubbaZanetti, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. jcmcc

    jcmcc Been here awhile

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    professional help?? HAH! I got a screwdriver and a hammer. doesnt get much more professional than that! :lol3

    Maybe I'll dink around with the needle height and whatnot... For what its worth, I'm fairly convinced its a carb setup problem, as opposed to a "clean the carb" problem since it does start and run great aside from this throttle annoyance
    #41
  2. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

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    Any chance that you have too much slack in the throttle cable? Might make the response seem funny and unpredictable...
    #42
  3. jcmcc

    jcmcc Been here awhile

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    well i went through the carb and it did help the problem a little but I think I'm just going to have to deal with it:1drink its all good

    also, I need some kick stand advice. Mine leans over a good 35-40 degrees and I can hear the sucker creaking as it settles.

    I saw a few OEM ones on ebay, but I think replacing a 30 year old kickstand with another 30 year old kickstand may be wasting my time. A new one from BikeBandit is over $70:huh

    Is there a way to modify/repair the stock one, or can someone recommend an aftermarket one?
    #43
  4. LashLarue

    LashLarue Been here awhile

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    I had a parts bike and pulled the stand from it. The first one was almost letting the bike tip over. Never did figure out why, just switched it out.

    About the low speed problems, it is usually a plugged idle jet. They are tiny. Do the fuel filter and either clean the jet or get a new one. My guess is the main is coming on when it jumps. Very easy to fix, pop off the float bowl, use grease on the gasket to hold it in place when you reassemble.
    #44
  5. 51D7H3K1D

    51D7H3K1D n00b

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    Are the high bars on this bike comfortable? they seem way high. Im not sure how it would look with low bars though... hmmmm,:huh
    #45
  6. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

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    I'm pretty sure that the bars on mine aren't stock, they're fairly low, and I think they look fine. "Fine" is relative on this rat, but still...

    I need to update my thread in Builds about the cafe project. I had some time to tinker a couple of weeks ago and ended up removing a bunch of unnecessary weight...exhaust megaphones, passenger pegs and brackets, starter and solenoid...
    #46
  7. jcmcc

    jcmcc Been here awhile

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    Hey bumping this thread again for more advice. I'm wondering if anybody has played with gearing at all. Motorcycle superstore has 3 sizes of front sprockets (13,14, and 15 tooth). I know changing the front alters the gearing more than the back. The goal I have is to lower the revs a little on the highway if possible without losing around town drivability. I'm not sure how it would affect top speed- my guess is that it would remain about the same?
    #47
  8. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

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    I haven't messed with the gearing on mine (I mean what's the point, it just sits there on a dolly in the garage :lol3) but the general rule of thumb is that one tooth on the countershaft gives the same effect as a three-tooth change on the rear sprocket.

    And something to be careful of on a little bike like that, it's pretty easy to gear it higher than the engine can pull. You end up losing any drive at speed and basically just bogging around.
    #48
  9. FuriousGeorge

    FuriousGeorge Been here awhile

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    I haven't changed the gearing on mine, but I'd listen to what Bart said. These bikes barely have the power to pull stock gearing. I wouldn't be at all surprised if you lost a little top speed with a larger front sprocket. At least they're pretty cheap. Doesn't cost too much to experiment.
    #49
  10. Meter Man

    Meter Man Living on a prayer

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    #50
  11. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    The TwinStar was a great bike (in it's day) A new one would still be a great bike. But a bike that old is going to have issues, and there are very few parts available for it. That is true for most older Japanese bikes. They are high quality, but the Japanese don't support what they sell for very long, they want you to buy a new bike rather than keep fixing an older one.

    These bikes were also designed to make them unfeasible to do major repairs on. The cam runs directly in the head, and when things wear out, both the cam and head have to be replaced. The crank and connecting rods are a one piece pressed together unit, and have to be replaced as one piece. Bearings are not replaceable.

    I used to own an '04 Honda Rebel 250, and belonged to a Rebel forum. While Rebel parts are still available, and the 250 is still in production, many people showed up with CM185s, CM200s, CM250s, CB250s, and even CM450 Rebels, looking for parts. Other than eBay, you are pretty much out of luck. I almost bought a 450 Rebel, until I found out about the parts problem. You can't even get a cylinder base gasket for one. Go to cheapcycleparts.com or bikebandit.com and see what they have for parts for these bikes. Almost nothing. Even if it runs great now, it will need parts at some point, and you will have a lawn ornament on wheels. The later model Nighrhawk 250 or Rebel 250 would be a much better deal

    A vintage Vespa is also a really fun toy. I have a Genuine Stella, it is the same as a Vespa, only made in India, with a different name. There are tons of mechanical parts for most vintage Vespas. They are like the Harley of scooters.

    I have seen so many vintage Japanese bikes on Craigslist that I really wanted, and always found the same thing. No parts available.
    #51
  12. jcmcc

    jcmcc Been here awhile

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    Thats pretty much what I figured would happen.. The question was driven more by curiosity than anything. I would think uphill starts would probably suffer a good deal with a bigger sprocket in front.
    #52
  13. readytoride77

    readytoride77 n00b

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    I recently bought a new motor for my 1980 CM200t. Being an idiot, i didn't check to see if the years were compatible, and i bought a 81. when i put it in i figured out that they have a totally different contact point system. mine has a four wire and the new one has an eight wire. Is there a way to swap these out without rewiring the whole thing? any help please.
    #53
  14. bfd70

    bfd70 Been here awhile

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    First bike was a 1980 cm400. Back then I was around the same size as your friend. 75 is probably an accurate top speed, but it felt faster than 100 on my RR does now.:norton
    #54
  15. DisorganizedVince

    DisorganizedVince Been here awhile

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    I put a bigger front sprocket on my CM200T before I wrecked it - it was +1 or +2 teeth from standard. From what I remember it'd pull 60 a lot more comfortably, and go a little faster on the flats, didn't really change speed up hills as you'd be WOT in 3rd doing the same speed you'd be doing in 4th before. The bike was never made for acceleration in the first place but it probably did suffer in that department

    Realising this is replying to an old post here, but in case anybody else searches it up - the valvetrain on these bikes are supposed to be rattly. When I first got my CM200T it had almost 0 valve clearance, set it properly and it made such a racket it scared the shit out of me and I took it to a bike shop - the guy theres reply was 'those bikes were always noisy, don't worry about it and ride it :D'
    Can't remember exactly how to find TDC, but it's 360 degrees apart for each cylinder, if your tappets feel loose and the ol' screwdrive in the plug hole confirms it you've probably got TDC. I think there was a dot on the cam chain sprocket, will see if I've still got a picture.

    [​IMG]
    Note the dot on the sprocket


    Another edit :D

    Parts availability for these bikes are amazing, check here -
    http://www.wemoto.com/bikes/honda/cm_200_tb/83-84/
    Or here for 79 - 81
    http://www.wemoto.com/bikes/honda/cm_200_ta/79-82/

    Pretty much anything else you need you can find on eBay
    #55
  16. 9secondsflat

    9secondsflat Been here awhile

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    i have looked and didnt see, what is the air fuel screw ( has a cap on it) setting once its bottomed out? how many turns out? This is the one front buttom of the fuel bowl.

    on the right side of the carb is a brass screw with a spring, how many turns out once its bottomed for a baseline? this is idle screw?
    #56
  17. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    I know for a fact those engines are bulletproof, unless you've got armor piercing rounds. I tried for some time to kill a Rebel 250, rode it WOT for thousands of miles, didn't faze it. I wish they would bring the CM250 back. Or the early '80s Suzuki GS250. They are much better bikes than any 250 street bike out there today.

    As with any old Japanese bike, parts are a problem. Some of the more common parts are available, but try finding internal engine parts, gaskets, carb and air filter parts, etc.
    #57
  18. hzoltaan

    hzoltaan Adventurer

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    Funny enough, so far I was able to get almost all for it, though I did not need anything big.
    The bike I got for next to nothing had a missing oil pressure valve. After some research I was able to order it in a local shop. Internet is really a cool thing with an old bike. The part arrived in Honda packaging.
    Original rebuild kit is also available for the carb, though it's price made me wink. Got a Chinese copy of the original carb (they are selling some quad engines with that carb) It works. Can't compare with the original is it was fubar, was unable to fix fuel level of idle mixture. With this it works. We'll see how long, of course.

    I guess if you want something trickier like gearing or something, you might have problems. I hope I'll be able to put a few thousand kms in before I find that out.

    By the by the engine really makes a racket. thanks for the info here that it's normal. I'm used to 2 stroker Jawas, of which one I rode till the piston rod had 1.5mm play. Those are noisy as hell, but the little CM is a fair opponent. :D
    #58