Honda CRF500L Owners

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by Scutty, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. flipflopdog

    flipflopdog Youth & Talent, no match 4 Old Age & Treachary

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    Thanks Scutty, couldn't find this image on google but just the job anyway !!
    While we're on electrics, hard wired both switch clusters today along with extending the throttle body sensor loom section. Big mistake was not including the front section wiring loom from the CB500 donor bike if any future build persons are reading this, now an issue..!! Basically as per Scutty's analysis 'THE LOOM of DOOM' takes another victim........
    michaelkozera likes this.
  2. J_B

    J_B Mid-life Crisis

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    Hi Flipflop, not sure I understand you comments on the loom , can you clarify , electrics aren't my strength ....
  3. flipflopdog

    flipflopdog Youth & Talent, no match 4 Old Age & Treachary

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    JB, no bother, basically there is a multi-pin connector on the main body of the loom that has a sub loom extension going up to the headstock area connecting the clocks, headlight and indicators ect. This section I failed to bring back with me when I stripped out the loom at the breakers.
    On the switch clusters I did away with bulky connectors and soldered the wires straight together. The actual switch halves together can be routed through the stanchion and frame gaps and up to the bars no probs.
    Various plugs and sockets on the build were short reaching so required extending.
    I think it's fair to say, even with many loom conversions under my belt it's still quite a chore to convert successfully and have the patience to do a good job. What I do is label each connector either as the bike is stripped down or use a manual wiring diagram after (if you buy the loom separate) and identify with wire colours. This will help when positioning components on the re-installation and fast track recognising which connectors are short etc.
    Another tip is to strip the loom bare of all tape and sleeving to again enable re-positioning and routing.

    I will post up later an itinerary of all points to watch out for if you like....
  4. Samtech79

    Samtech79 Two wheeled lunatic

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    Why didn't you just buy the front section on EBay?
    Honestly, start with two main harnesses, the CRF harness, the front and engine harness from the CB and build from there.
    The control plugs are mirror opposites front the CB to the CRF so you can use the CRF plugs and gain a little length. Then start from the ECU on one harness and plug all the peripherals in on the other. Split in the middle and route however you like.
    There's nothing easy about the wiring on this beast so don't think I'm trying to make it sound easy... it's not. However, if you start with a surplus of wiring it's easier to make it work how you want it.
    It's loom of doom after all...
  5. flipflopdog

    flipflopdog Youth & Talent, no match 4 Old Age & Treachary

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    I did buy a front loom section off ebay but a CB500 one. I'd sooner have pin-2-pin peace of mind on the chassis connector and then modify the extremities of the loom, they are very close anyway up around the headstock area so shouldn't be too hard to sort......
  6. totensiebush

    totensiebush re-tarded

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    Looks like I should finally be getting some money from when I got hit. I guess I need to start looking for a CRF250L or CRF250M, and then find a wrecked 500 to get parts off of. https://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/mcy/d/2013-honda-crf-250l/6294068533.html something like that might be a decent bike choice (they aren't exactly easy to find cheap). Engines don't appear to be too hard to find on ebay etc but don't include harness/ecu/TBs/etc... what would a reasonable price be for engine/TBs/harness (complete)/ecu?

    Of course, I'll feel the need to upgrade the suspension and brakes as well...
  7. totensiebush

    totensiebush re-tarded

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    Does anyone know what the widest (17") tire is that you can reasonably fit in the swingarm? With the right rim, will a 150 or 160 fit, or will I need to run something smaller?
  8. Samtech79

    Samtech79 Two wheeled lunatic

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    I'm just over in Sacto if you want to play with a CRF500L before diving in.
    I've run a 130/90-18 Motoz Enduro (freaking huge tire) on the this swing arm. It's a tight fit...
    130/80-18 T61 is about right. A 150 is way too fat unless you want to do a SM or something. The 500 doesn't have enough power to make use of such a big tire so it'll just make it an I'll handling pig. A 140 rally style tire would probably be alright, like a Michelin rally or a scorpion rally... maybe a 140 Miya's E-09 but it'll be tight... 2.15 rims are stronger than 3" rims anyhow. Better to stick with a 120 or 130.
  9. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Been here awhile

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    the crf250l has ~160mm of space between the chain guard and the swing arm up where the tire sits. if you remove the chain guard you can get ~175mm of actual tire space.



    however.
    i ran the task master II (120/100) and im currently running the 130/80 T61.

    the T61 is 124mm wide from the furthest lug to the furthest lug. while the TM-II is 133mm wide ( taller lugs that protrude wider).

    now even tho both these tries are far smaller then 160mm, its important to note that tires flex. my TM-II would leave rubber scuff marks on the swing arm and chain guard if i ran 20psi or less. while the smaller t61 would leave scuff marks at 15psi or less. not to mention both tires scrapped the mudguard which is why i extended my swing arm by 1.5cm's.




    but we are talking super moto 17's which are smaller height wise, so the tires hitting the mud guard wont really be an issue. another thing too is that the swing arm gets wider the closer you get to the axle, so 160mm might turn into more like 165mm ( or 175mm into 180mm with the chain guard removal), ill have to go measures to get exact numbers.

    also if your running 17's the the tires will be run at a higher pressure (35-45psi) and 17's have thicker sidewalls so tire deflection wont be an issue as much.


    so realistically you could run a road tire 150 -17" tire maybe 160.... like it would be tight might even rub even at higher pressures. and i agree with samtech, if using 18" 130 is the limit. 140 maybe if the lugs are small.
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  10. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    With a bike as light as the CRF with the CB500 engine, you won't need to run high tire pressures. Something in the upper 20's will probably be about right. Maybe low 30's if you intend to load it down with gear. I run 33f/36r unladen and 34f/39r loaded on my CB500X and that feels a bit much on road and too much on gravel. I run 705's. My CB is heavy, I'm a fat man, and I really load this pig down when I ride. My bike is 455lbs with the farkles and fuel. I am 230lbs in gear and carry at least 60lbs of kit.
  11. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Been here awhile

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    33f/36r seems low for 17" tires.......

    the cb500x manual calls for 36f/42r.


    or are you saying that 33/36 better suites the bike? it does make sense as my R1 called for 36f/42r but that bike was 4 times the power.
  12. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    When I went by the factory specs, the suspension would suffer from fade. I would loose all dampening in the OE shock. The tires would bounce like basket balls and it was difficult to keep traction on rough roads. After lowering the the tire pressures a little, the shock and forks don't ride as harsh and the OE shock stopped fading away on long rides. The rear shock eventually failed anyway and lost all dampening. The OE Scorpions lost traction at OE specs and using lower tire pressures gave the tires more bite. I know some of the problems lie with the crap OE suspension and the fact that I probably push it a bit harder than Honda expects it's owners too. On the CB500X forum there are reports of better hadling and tire wear running lower pressures. Some of the guys over there are running down in the upper 20's, but they are light weights and not pushing the bike very hard. :dunno

    When I was a young (teenage) sport bike rider, I would do the math to find out exactly what the tire PSI should be for the weight they were carrying. Yes, I would weigh everything too. :fpalm
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  13. totensiebush

    totensiebush re-tarded

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    17s = SM

    It's not that I need the extra width, especially of a 160, it's that there are more tires available for 160 than 150, and far more than 140.
  14. Samtech79

    Samtech79 Two wheeled lunatic

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  15. totensiebush

    totensiebush re-tarded

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    I should've thought to look for that. Instead I looked at the parts fiche for the CRF250M and it has a 130, which made me think maybe the swingarm was really skinny.
  16. flipflopdog

    flipflopdog Youth & Talent, no match 4 Old Age & Treachary

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    Gents, a recap on your rear suspension units. I doubt any of you are running stock..??? I'm squaring up to an Ohlins or a Hagon. The Ohlins unit isn't much more in cost than the Hagon and is favourite so far....
  17. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Been here awhile

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    im running stock. all i did tho was change the rear linkage with a custom link to raise my bike by 2" and give 2" more travel, at the expense of preload of course.

    when bike was stock i had it set to 80% (stock is 70-ish%) i weigh 175lb. now with the new link i have it dam near maxed, ~95%.

    stock shock is not to bad actually. the forks are the real downer on this bike, not the rear IMO.
  18. Scutty

    Scutty Been here awhile

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    Come on, the rear shock is pants. The Ohlins is night and day better, especially for the larger rider. Go with Ohlins , is brilliant.
    I went with Racetech for the forks and it's a big improvement but not as b8g as the shock upgrade.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
  19. Samtech79

    Samtech79 Two wheeled lunatic

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    I'd have to agree with that. The stock shock fades pretty quickly in the rougher, faster bits.
    The thing is about it is that you probably won't realize how bad it is until you ride with a good one that's set up right.
  20. flipflopdog

    flipflopdog Youth & Talent, no match 4 Old Age & Treachary

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    Good input fella's. I went 'Yellow' in the end..!! I've upgraded quite a few rear ends in my time (excluding the wife..!!) but always body swerved Ohlins because of cost. I can't wait to get home, something about rear shocks I love and its pointless running stock when the opinion is so high and disappointing... I ordered mine from KAIS and he said hold on a month or so for a front spring set coming out for the 'L', May as well have it set up right from the word go.