Honda Deauville (NT700V) Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Towjam, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. bluesman

    bluesman Long timer

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    OK, since my comment on maintenance was purely about maintenance let me try to give you more information.

    As I mentioned before - you can order it with XL panniers lids that are quite deeper and allow you to easily stuff full face helmet plus countless stuff (as my friend on Norway ride did). Panniers are interconnected, so that luggage space are across both sides above rear wheel.
    It is suprisingly agile and fast on backroads. Honda top box also available, as well as bellypan/feet protector that covers feet from water from under front wheel. Unfortunately at 280 Euro it is way to dear and instead aftermarket parts are cheaper and better looking.
    Windshield is adjustable, but not "remotely" as on ST1300. Just mechanics - loose bolts, move, tighten.
    Fuel exonomy is excellent. Not sure how to translate it to mpg but it took 4.5 - 5.5 liter per 100 on that trip.
    In a falls those little pieces of grey plastic protect fairing from scratches quite well (my friend tested it unfortunately).
    CABS is standard and works brilliantly. Brakes just really good.
    Excellent ground clearance too.
    Injection works perfectly too. Lightweight - it isn't, and you will feel it until it starts to move (typical Honda).
    Top speed tested to be about 198 kmph.


    Apart from pain in the backside for maintenance (which is more of problem for non-experience wrenches :)) and fact that it is JUST A MOTORCYCLE it is excellent real life machine.
    However, build quality is not as old Deauville, but unless you nitpicking kinda guy (I am) you will not even notice it.
    #41
  2. XPADREX

    XPADREX Funslinger

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    First- thanks for the review. Second, 5L/100km = about 47 mpg. according to a conversion website I checked out.

    Not horrible for a loaded tourer.
    #42
  3. PizzaHog

    PizzaHog Thought Criminal

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    We may be jumping the gun a bit on this. I've found nothing to prove that this is a US-version of the Deauville. The NT700V might share some/many things with the Deauville, but it might have some modernization/upgrades as well. I'm not seeing anything proving that the engine is the same - it might have the same displacement, but with hydraulic lifters a possibility, more modern materials...I'm adopting a wait-and-see approach. The ST is supposedly a beast to do maint on, and though I'm no "real" wrench, I did everything but throttle body syncs on my own.

    Deauville review/specs are here. NT700 specs are here. [Thanks to ST-Owners members for the links and info!] Maybe some of you folks on the other side of the pond can do the US-metric conversions to see if there's any mechanical differences re: specs.
    #43
  4. jdiaz

    jdiaz .

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    Rick, are you sure? I bought my K75S in 1989, and its MSRP was $7325.

    I looked at a PC too, and I'm pretty sure it wasn't more expensive than the BMW.
    #44
  5. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    You got me :lol3
    #45
  6. bluesman

    bluesman Long timer

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    Deauville is NT700V and NT700. Older Deauville was 650 engine. NT700 have same motor with Transalp. No way it is different bikes. Even indexes for submodels is same - NT700V and NT700VA (ABS). Review attached to specs is review of NT700 my friend bought 3 month ago, this bike was released in end of 2008 and went on sales soon after Intemot 2008. It is same bike. Deauville just an European "signature name" for that bike since many years. So - no, it is not US version or anything it is just same bike...

    #46
  7. Infallible

    Infallible Into the Wild Blue Yonder

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    As I said in the other thread, an ABS equipped weestrom is cheaper than the non abs Deauville. Honda will pull these from the market within two years.
    #47
  8. jeffs900s

    jeffs900s Prophet of Doom

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    You make some good points, but here's why I think they will regret sending this bike to the US. I've never ridden one, so this is all from a bystanders prospective. (Though, that's about the level of expereince most US buyers will have with the bike too.) This bike sits in a VERY specific niche market, and Honda has made it pretty clear in the past that it does not want niche market bikes in the US (which is why this move totally baffles me). They take up dealership floor space that could otherwise be used for lawnmowers etc.

    So it's a mid displacement, somewhat premium priced, commuter/tourer. While it might be the worlds greatest bike in that niche, it seems as though that's a really small target clientele to be aiming for, at least here in the US where most riders see their bikes as 'toys'.

    And there does not seem to be any possibilty of attracting a wider audience. It's a spec chart loser, rather expensive, and not particularly good looking to put it kindly. Even using the (recent) sales-dud VFR as a measuring stick, it's hard to see how this bike would cast a wider net.

    For example, one could see that someone might buy a niche bike like a BMW GS, just because they like the image, or think the bike is cool. If BMW only sold GSs to those who use the bike to its capability, they'd probably sell a tiny fraction of the bikes that they do. Is someone going to walk into the Honda dealer, fall in lust with a Dauville and begin dreaming about putting off on their daily commute? Imagine themselves washing their journey's dead bugs off of it's lumpy mishapen gray plastic bodywork? It seems to be a rather passionless appliance designed (and probably perfect) for an amazingly tiny fraction of US riders.
    #48
  9. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

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    .....and I am afraid he may be right. In the "real world" of the U.S. market, this bike is a super small niche.

    I HOPE that Americans will flock to this bike and start commuting to work on it in droves. I hope that tomorrow people wake up and realize that commuting to work on a motorcycle is one of the best things that they can do to make their lives better, more fun, and better for the planet as well.

    I hope that all the squids who buy a crotch rocket and sell it six months later because it hurts their wrists and doesn't do "slow" well, will buy a practical bike like this one.

    I know that Jeffs900s is right, however. So, screw it......I'm going for a ride. First my Monster, then my V-Strom. Cheers.

    :ricky :beer :baldy
    #49
  10. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin?

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    It is also already designed, built, and currently out on the road. The changes that need to be made for the U.S. market are small and cheap. The price of entry is right, and if it flops they didn't lose a hell of a lot.

    It is probably not powerful enough for my taste, but if I hadn't already bought a new GW this year I might have had a look at one.
    #50
  11. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    I can't find any indication anywhere that it might have hydraulic valve lash adjustment.
    #51
  12. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    Maybe my memory is a little off. I found a road test from 1998 that stated $ 8699.

    Then I found this though I don't know how accurate it is either.

    #52
  13. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    That's a very persuasive post :deal

    As a slight aside, the NTV650 engine is one of my faves. If I were to buy a pre-08 transalp, it would be because of that cosseting vtwin. The 700cc version adds more urgency, which can't be a bad thing.

    If the 700 is close to what you want, please test ride one. I'm not saying it's the world's greatest bike, but it's worth looking into if it meets your needs.
    #53
  14. jeffs900s

    jeffs900s Prophet of Doom

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    But you could make the same arguement for many of the cool euro and/or Japan only bikes that Honda refuses to sell in the US. Why do we get this one?

    My guess is that they'll sell about 12 of these things over the next two years, the local Honda dealer will have "buy a snowblower and get a Dauville free" sales, and this style of bike will be "Transalp-ed" into Honda's memory banks forever.
    #54
  15. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    I sure hope you're wrong and maybe this bike is aimed as people who have gotten a taste with scooters over the past few years, and may want to step up.

    I'm not a new bike buyer, but as a daily commuter ( me, not the bike) I think this bike would make a great daily commuter.
    #55
  16. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    I did year-round on the 650. Flawless, tbh, in that role. Bit top-heavy at slow speed, and sensitive to tyre pressures and tyre choice, but they are very minor niggles.
    #56
  17. jeffs900s

    jeffs900s Prophet of Doom

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    I hope I'm wrong too. It's about time we (Americans) get serious about bikes as more than playthings.
    #57
  18. RaY YreKa

    RaY YreKa Palanquins RTW

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    I think workhorse is a much maligned term for a bike; all mine have been workhorses, it's why I develop a bond with them I suppose :1drink
    #58
  19. bhkami

    bhkami Adventurer

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    Hot damn, if this is $10,000, how much will the VFR1200 be? I was hoping the VFR1200 would be priced with the CBR1000R, but...probably not.
    #59
  20. XPADREX

    XPADREX Funslinger

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    So what? The Strom in its various forms is always held up as some form of Holy Grail.

    The reality is that the majority of the people on this site, and in the world- don't ride V-Stroms.

    They're fine bikes- but whether or not a bike costs more than a chain-drive Strom isn't the final arbiter of what people buy. I rode a DL1000, bought a Caponord. Rode a DL650, bought an F650GS. I would enjoy a DL650, I'm sure- but it wasn't what I wanted in total.

    Look at the Deauville compared to the Strom- similar markets in that their prospective riders most likely ATGATT- but otherwise, not precisely the same.

    I get what you're saying- but it's not precisely a legit issue. First off, Hondas routinely cost more than Suzukis. Whether this is deserved or not is up to the buying public- but I've found over the years that there's little in the way (with of course marked exceptions) of motorcycles with resale like Hondas.

    They have a reputation- again, subjective perhaps- as being quality.

    In addition, this new bike features some other components- luggage and shaft drive- which might be worth it for some folks. For others, maybe not. For every person who lusts after a Transalp, there is the KLR. Nothing wrong with that at all.

    However, the presence of one does not automatically exclude the other.

    I will say this, though: once more, people who ask "why don't they bring the Euro bikes over" had better pry loose some of that moldy money and put up or shut up.

    Straight up, as an enthusiast and participant in the industry it upsets me when those few "niche" (read: not a "cruiser" or a "crotchrocket") bikes manage to hit showrooms, and people don't make a move- coming in long after they're gone to inquire "Where are the ____insert cool bike we all claimed to want but only a few of us ponied up for here___?"
    #60