Honda Dio 125cc

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by oldbutspry, Dec 28, 2013.

  1. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    155
    Location:
    Seoul, Korea
    So I'm over in South Korea and needed something to commute on while I was waiting for my car and motorcycle to arrive. We live right next to the scooter market so it was easy to find one. I went looking for a used one but raggedy Korean scooters started at about $750. We wound up buying a new Honda for about $1800.

    I can't read the specs on the scooter since the manual is in Japanese. I'm sure it is air-cooled, has a kick starter and a carburetor. Gas mileage seems good but definitely below 100mpg. I tend to wring the heck out of the throttle so I could probably improve the mileage if I tried.

    It handles great and goes plenty fast. It'll take me and the wife up to 80kph or so (about 50mph). I've had it up to 90kph but I think it was a slight downhill. Basically, I never have any reason to go over 80kph here in downtown Seoul. I've got almost 1900 km on it now.

    Overall, I'm not happy with my purchase. Why? The passenger footpegs stink because the wife has a hard time keeping her feet secure. She doesn't like to travel more than 5 or 10 miles because of the footpegs. That's a big problem because the scoot is way easier to find parking for than the car. My motorcycle is here so maybe we will just have to use it on the weekends. It's not really an issue at the moment because my wife doesn't like riding when the temps are in the 30's.

    Another bad thing is that there isn't much in the way of aftermarket support. No leg aprons available except for universal ones that probably wouldn't fit well. Same for windshields. Not a big deal but I see lots of accessories like this on other scoots every day. Wish I had a better idea of what to look for when I got my scooter.

    I use my WarmNSafe electric jacket & gloves on my commute (3 or 4 miles). At first I hooked it up to the scoot battery. The gear got warm but not nearly as warm as on a regular motorcycle. After about a week the battery was discharged too much to start. Maybe I would have been ok if I didn't need to have the lights turned on. Anyway, I bought the 7.2v battery that goes on your belt. The belt battery warms a little but not so much. I still occasionally plug into the scoot battery if it is especially cold.

    Oh yeah, it's confusing trying to buy stuff for the Honda Dio. In Japan, they sell a 50cc 2-stroke by the same name. And in India, they sell a 110cc scoot by the same name (totally different scooter). I mean, what the heck is Honda thinking? Oh well.

    It has been a great mode of transport. I can zip through traffic like crazy here in Seoul. Scooters are everywhere and they drive like they are exempt from all traffic laws. I'm a bit more cautious but still benefit from the system.

    Pics (taken a few months ago):

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    You might find something like a Scooter Skirt useful for winter riding. Look it up at www.scooterskirts.com. It's an insulated, fitted lap blanket that attaches with a belt around your waist. It works pretty well for me here when it is 35 to 45 degrees. It stays with you when you stand up, so either you wear it into places or you lock it up at the scooter somehow.

    Your other issues are more complicated. Maybe the solution is a second scooter for your wife. There is nothing better with a motor for getting around in the jam packed cities of the world.
    #2
  3. gitsum79

    gitsum79 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    southern Arizona
    My wife had the same issue with the lack of true footpegs on our Tomos Nitro 150. I used some hard 3/4" wooden dowel covered in rubber hosing to make actual pegs. I trimmed a ho!e in the plastic panel and the wooden dowel is hammered into some existing frame tubing that was pointing exactly at the right angle/position.

    You could also weld a couple of pegs to a flat piece metal stock piece that can be screwed down onto the floorboard.

    [​IMG]
    #3
  4. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    You shouldn't have any trouble finding some kind of fabricator in Seoul to help you. When I was there, there were little hole in the wall shops everywhere doing all kinds of stuff.
    #4
  5. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
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    Location:
    Seoul, Korea
    I thought about a scooter skirt but the leg aprons that stay attached to the scooter seem nicer.

    Getting another scooter is not an option. It took me months to get approval to register a third vehicle (car, motorcycle, scooter). Plus, my wife has no interest in driving a scooter here because it is much more dangerous than the US.
    #5
  6. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

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    I thought about making some footpegs. They would have to be folding so I don't hit them on cars when lane splitting. In the US it would be much easier - here I live in a high-rise so I don't really a place for messy activities (or most of my tools, for that matter).
    #6
  7. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

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    I'll see if I can find some place to make something.
    #7
  8. Chillis

    Chillis Land Barge Pilot

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    Careful which straw you are sipping from! :1drink

    To the OP, is that a 4 stroke?
    #8
  9. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
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    Seoul, Korea
    Yes, it's a 4 stroke. I actually wanted a 2 stroke but there weren't any new ones for sale. I occasionally hear a 2 stroke driving around but most everything is 4 stroke.

    Maybe I sounded a bit down on my scooter in my post. I do like the scooter but sometimes small little things can make a big difference in your enjoyment of it. I bought it at 6 or 7pm so I would have something to drive to work the next day so I didn't get to do the research I usually do before buying.
    #9
  10. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Seoul, Korea
    So I've been reading the forum more (and lots of links). I got curious and went to see what engine my scooter has. The number is SDH1P52QMI-5. Is this a common engine? I did a google search but the results are almost all foreign languages.

    ETA: Ok, It seems like this is a 152QMI or a 1P52QMI (GY6 family). Not sure if those are exactly the same or just very similar. I'm glad to see they are apparently quite common.
    #10
  11. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
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    Seoul, Korea
    How do you like your Walmart ATV seat pad? I was thinking of getting one of those for my scooter seat.
    #11
  12. Horizontal

    Horizontal Goatin' Around

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    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Hey, oldbutspry, I like your scooter. It reminds me a bit of the old Honda Elite here in the states that went all swoopy for one year; might have been a 1990 model or so. Every once in a while they pop up on CL.

    I can't even SEE any footpegs on that thing. Whoever designed it must not have spent much time actually riding on it.
    #12
  13. Motovista

    Motovista Parts is Parts

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    Charleston, SC
    That is a Chinese way of describing the characteristics of an engine. What it means is that it's a single cylinder (1) horizontal engine (P) with a 52mm bore (52), in an air cooled (Q) motorcycle (M) with 125cc displacement (I). I would be very curious to see a parts fiche. The SDH probably has to do with Honda. The reasons I think it's not a GY6 are the SDH, and that in Vietnam, where they sold the same bikes, and the people are experts at keeping things on the road way beyond forever, some of the information I found suggests that parts for this bike are difficult to find and expensive. This leads me to believe, and I may be wrong, that you can't use common GY6 parts, which are pretty much interchangeable, on this particular engine. This is very intriguing, becdause it looks a lot like a GY6 engine.
    #13
  14. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Seoul, Korea
    Thanks, these little Hondas are pretty common over here. The 125cc size makes a lot of sense because I think the fastest roads open to motorcycles/scooters is 80kph. Of course, the most popular brands here are Korean (Daelim).

    And yeah, the only "footpegs" are the little ledges on the side. It looks sleek but not very comfy. The seat is just ok, too. I suppose it was meant more as an 'around town' scooter which it does very well.
    #14
  15. oldbutspry

    oldbutspry Mr. Guns and Bikes!

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    Location:
    Seoul, Korea
    Fortunately, I haven't had any reason to check the availability of spare parts.

    Speaking of parts availability, I am thinking of bringing this back to the states with me when I return. I see you sell parts for Honda scooters. If I came in to buy parts for it, would you be able to order them?
    #15