Honda PCX 150

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by Southerner, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Long timer

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    From the pics it doesn't appear to be any way to zip tie a milk crate to the back. Can it really be called a scooter?
  2. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Since you are in Mexico, you may not have the 150cc law there. If not, I would consider the Zuma 125. It will do 50-55 mph, and you can load it down easily. You can get a Yamaha rack for it, I got a Shad rack/case mount for mine instead (it's listed on the U.S. Yamaha site) and a Shad 33L top box. You can also add saddlebags, and install highway pegs, which lets you use the entire floor for storage (the PCX does not have a flat floor) I did a 700 mile round trip on mine with no problems other than the aforementioned freeway miles, with only the top case, underseat storage, and a backpack. I have found it comfortable and rugged, it easily carries my 220 pounds.

    Not putting down the PCX, looks like a great scooter (other than the valves), it and the Zuma are completely different appearance wise, the PCX is a little bigger physically, but the Zuma seems to have more options for carrying stuff.
  3. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    Hey JerryH that is some good stuff, the Zuma DOES get here, and the PCX dosen't, The zuma is one of the most expensive of the scooters under 150 cc but it is everything you mention, maybe even made in Japan, there are a couple of Mexico made Hondas (I own one) and they are $1,000 usd cheaper than the Zuma (jere is call BW, some scoot, just different lights).

    I will continue to read about both (or 4 if you count the Vespa and the Piaggio)

    Thanks

    Damasovi
  4. miner

    miner n00b

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    crazy pennsylvania weather in january gave me a chance to get out and take a ride,roads a little wet and dirty but ok with me when temps reach 65 filled up again 97mpg and i dont think i'd be riding pcx 150 on interstate either rides and handles good but wind sure pushes it around otherwise its lots of fun:nod
  5. DOUBLE-O G

    DOUBLE-O G Smooth Operator

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    Anyone here skipped the 2,500 mile valve adjustment for a 5,000 mile one? How's the maintenance in general for this little scoot? My wife wants one. I want one too - I think (since Honda won't be bringing the Forza 300 anytime soon).
  6. maddiedog

    maddiedog In dog we trust

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    Mine were slightly out of spec from factory, in-spec still at around 3000mi (if my memory serves correctly). I'm approaching 7000mi, and see NO need to even look at them until 10000+mi.

    If I was so inclined though, the procedure is easy: http://hondapcx.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=24

    The PCX is a one cylinder, two-valve bike. Short of massive failure involving a valve getting sheared off, the worst that will come of badly-adjusted valves is low compression, which you'll notice and know to adjust the valves. It's an economy bike -- unless you're a stickler for maintenance, just ride it and don't worry about it.

    I think one more thing to note, aside from valves being out of spec from the factory (which seems to have been limited to just me, I've never heard of it on any other PCXes), most people who adjust their valves and have reported back on the forums said they were still in-spec, just on the tight end of spec. (for reference, the valve specs on the PCX 125 are intake: 0.10 +/- .02mm, exhaust: 0.24 +/- .02mm.
  7. maddiedog

    maddiedog In dog we trust

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  8. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    This is correct and critical. If the valves are loose, you will notice a loss in performance, but not much else. If they are too tight however, the valves will not close all the way. While this will result in a slight loss in compression, the engine will still run, and you will not know about the problem until it is too late. The outer edges of the valves, especially the exhaust valve, get red hot, because they are so thin. When they make full contact with the valve seat, heat from the valve is transferred to the valve seat and head. If the valve does not make really good contact with the seat, the valves will burn quickly, leading to some expensive repairs. It could just mean new valves and seats, but since that red hot valve can act like a spark plug, and ignite the air/fuel mixture before it is supposed to, it can also cause detonation, which can put a hole in a piston really easy. In extreme cases it can make the engine run so hot that it destroys the head, piston, and cylinder.


    Most valves do stay in adjustment way longer than what the manufacturer recommends. But I would not take a chance, at least until the engine has a long enough history to pretty much tell you how long they will last. My '08 Vino 125 just passed 25,000 miles, and the valves have been adjusted once, and that was less than 5,000 miles ago. But they were checked way more often. I checked the intake valve almost every time I changed the oil, or about every 1000 miles, because the valve adjuster is right under the oil filler cap.


    I really have no idea why Honda specifies such a short interval between checks on the technologically advanced PCX150. The original Metropolitan had a valve check interval of 15,000 miles. I sold mine before ever reaching that point. But the Met valves were easy to check, they didn't require removing most of the bodywork like the PCX150. The PCX was on my list, I specifically decided against it because of the valve adjustment issue. Otherwise I would have probably bought it over the Zuma 125.
  9. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    We bought a pair of his & hers PCX 150s. They go in for their break-in service tomorrow. I'll be interested to hear if the valves need any adjustment. Both bikes pull good and seem very similar in power/economy.

    I plan to do the 2,500 interval valve checks myself, after this initial service.

    We have owned motocycles in the past, but this is our first go-round with scooters... I had no idea they were so EASY and FUN! I thought they'd be doggy, but I was pleasantly surprised.

    It's only been two weeks, but we are enjoying the heck out of these scooters.

    Best wishes,
    Captain Jim
  10. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Glad you like them, and wish you the best of luck with them. I liked the PCX from sitting on one at the dealer, never did ride it. At that time I was also considering a maxi scooter, and valve adjustments seemed to be a big issue with them. The Yamaha Majesty only needs to be checked every 26,000 miles, but it is a highway scooter, and it wouldn't take me long to put that many miles on it. To do the valves, most of the bodywork has to come off, and the whole engine/drivetrain has to come out. It's a $600 job at a dealer, though I would do it myself. I'm picky about things, and $600 at a dealer is 6 hours labor. I have a feeling doing it right would take twice that long.

    So when I started looking at smaller scooters, valves were very much on my mind. Due to the fact that I had a Japanese trade in (Kawasaki Ninja 500) for which I actually got a pretty decent deal on, I was looking at Japanese scooters. The only 2 within my price range were the PCX150 and the Zuma 125. The valve adjustment procedure is what I based my choice on. The Zuma is just like my Vino. You can check the valves in 10 minutes, and adjust them in about 20. It has plenty of power for me, but freeway legality is an issue. The PCX150 should be freeway legal. Now I'm looking for something that has both easy to get to valves and is freeway legal.

    BTW, could you let us know what the cost of the first service is?
  11. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    Hi Jerry,

    Regarding the cost of service: I will let you know. When we bought the bikes, the service manager (Jason), thought it would be around $150 each for the break-in service. We'll see if he remembers that number. :wink:

    He said they have the valve adjust time at about an hour and a half per bike. Looking on-line at the procedure, there is plenty of stuff that has to come off to get to it.

    I just came in off the scoot - dang that thing makes me smile. A woman in a car started a "left turn"... I grabbed two hands full of brakes... she hit hers, too. No issue. First time I've had to see how fast they can stop, when you really, really want to. Maybe I've mellowed, maybe it's the bike... I hardly wanted to reach in through the window, yank her keys out, and throw 'em across the road. :evil

    Yet, I'm still smiling. :D I heard from an old motorcycling buddy that I haven't visited with in a year or so... "You bought a what?" He has a garage full of bikes... bet this one would make him smile, too.

    Best wishes,
    Jim
  12. RUNDCM

    RUNDCM Adventurer

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    Would that be the Jason with shop outside of Frederick MD? I also have PCX 150, am waiting to hear your feedback on valve adjustment...I'm aboiut due....
  13. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    No, this would be a dealer in Scottsdale, AZ. Western Honda. This will be our first service experience with them. I'm hoping it goes as easy as the buying experience. :evil
  14. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Scooters are a relaxing ride, and very comfortable. You don't feel "on edge" like riding a sport bike. Not sure how to explain that better. I think scooters compare well to cruisers in the motorcycle world. The riding position is similar, they are both comfortable, and they both impart a feeling of being "in control" Most of my time on sport bikes was spent feeling like I was very close to being out of control. Sport bikes are very intense, and they make you feel that way too. IMO, not the best for city riding. Scooters and cruisers give you that calm relaxed feeling and let you enjoy the ride, without having to fight both traffic and the bike. You still have to watch out for sure, but there is a huge difference in the riding experience. Most sport bike riders would almost certainly find scooters and cruisers to be too boring for them.
  15. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    OK, as promised, a quick review of the service experience. The short version: it all went just as promised (One in a row!! :evil) - the folks at Western Honda in Scottsdale, Arizona, are good with the service, just as they are with the sale. Kudos!

    The longer version:

    http://captnjim.blogspot.com/2013/03/break-in-service.html

    An hour and a half per bike, at the price they quoted me the day we bought the bikes.

    Best wishes,
    Captain Jim
  16. DOUBLE-O G

    DOUBLE-O G Smooth Operator

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    Did you ask about adjusting the valves at 2,500 miles or are you planning on having them checked at 5,000 miles along with the next oil change?
  17. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    I plan to do the valve check/adjustment at 2,500 miles, along with regular oil changes.
  18. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I change the oil in both my 125s at 1000 miles. Costs almost nothing, they hold under a qt., and there is no oil filter, both are the reasons why I change it so often. I change the oil and filter on my VN750 every 3000 miles, but it holds 4 qts., and is liquid cooled.

    Not sure what to say, I wouldn't advise anyone to disregard the manual on maintenance, unless you want to do it even more often, but if it were me, I would probably stretch the valve checks out to 5000 miles after checking them about 3 times, if they did not need adjustment. My Vino 125 has only needed one valve adjustment in 25,000 miles, and it was at around 19,000 miles. Does the PCX have screw and locknut or shim type adjustment?

    Glad things worked out at Western Honda. They are pretty much the only Japanese dealership around here I would recommend, and they are Honda only. They also have a small dealership, unlike some of the huge multi brand powersports emporiums around here that look like the Taj Mahal, and have super high overhead.
  19. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scootist

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    I appreciate your recommendation of Western Honda, Jerry. They are good folks to work with. The valves on the PCX are screw and locknut. I don't think I'd be comfortable going beyond the recommended mileage for the valves. Jason said they were right on at the break-in service. About the same oil capacity on the PCX, a quart.

    Maybe our paths will cross next time we're out this way.

    Best wishes,
    Jim
  20. DOUBLE-O G

    DOUBLE-O G Smooth Operator

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    Has anyone tried to see how fast the PCX 150 will go? Reviews say around 65 mph...
    How about keeping up with the flow of traffic in town? Has anyone dared to take it on the highway?