Honda VT500C Shadow

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by mikesova, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. ExTex

    ExTex Been here awhile

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    There are a lot of parts on Ebay. and www.oldbikebarn.com carries some.
    Honda still makes a lot of parts. I bought new coils 2 years ago and I had to wait a week for the new coils to arrive from the factory.

    Ride Safely,
    #21
  2. EngineeredDisaster

    EngineeredDisaster n00b

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    That sounds exactly like what mine is doing! What modifications do you need to do to fit the Dyna coils? Which coils did you buy? Also, what did you do for wires? It looks like you can't buy a new set of OEM wires anymore...
    #22
  3. Hengky

    Hengky n00b

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    my vt 500 (especialy bout price) one of the most relaible motorbike .
    I drag an old VT which is abandon 10 year ,from orphanage garage more than 4 year ago ,

    [​IMG]

    and now may across 11436 Km . Dont push so much, Just love her

    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]


    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
    #23
  4. Hengky

    Hengky n00b

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    I aggre with you, existing seat really far to word "comfortable", than i modified to single seater, and much better now :D
    #24
  5. brucifer

    brucifer Long timer

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    Nice build Hengky. That thing looks sweet! I like the Harley primary cover grafted on. How did you secure it to the engine?
    Do you have pics of the other side of the bike?
    #25
  6. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I have to totally agree with this. These were great bikes, light years ahead of any of the "cruiser" styled bikes Honda builds today. They were built back when bikes were meant to be ridden, not just looked at. It's to bad about the parts problem. But that's the way the Japanese do things. Build something for a short time, then drop it and replace it with something else, and after a few years, stop selling parts for it. It seems to be intentional, to prevent people from being able to repair and continue to ride older bikes. This was the William Edwards Deming way of doing things, and turned out to be very profitable for manufacturers.
    #26
  7. Paebr332

    Paebr332 Good news everyone!

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    Deming never advocated planned obsolescence. He advocated continuous improvement of systems. Not one of his 14 points nor his Seven Deadly Diseases nor his 8 Lesser Category Obstacles had anything to do with what you seem to be alluding to.

    Do you ever comment on a topic on which you have actual knowledge?
    #27
  8. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Continuous improvement of systems would sure seem to be planned obsolescence. Do you know why Harley has such a huge aftermarket? Yes, part of it is definitely the popularity of the bikes. But the rest of it is because Harley does not make major changes every year (continuous improvement of systems) Unlike the Japanese, their designs stick around for awhile, making it profitable to build and sell parts and accessories that will fit many model years. With their "continuous improvement", Japanese bikes are here today, gone tomorrow. They don't stick around long enough to make an aftermarket profitable.

    That 500 Shadow was a wonderful bike, and it would work just as well today as it did back then. But no, the Japanese could not leave well enough alone.

    There are exceptions. I ride a 2002 version of a bike that was designed in 1985, and sold through 2006. The EXACT same bike, other than paint colors. It was a great bike in 1985, was still the same great bike in 2002, and remained the same great bike through 2006. It would still be a great bike if produced today. Change just for the sake of change is never a good thing. It makes what was new yesterday obsolete almost instantly. That's another reason why even in today's economy, Harleys hold their value way better than Japanese bikes. Some might think cheap Japanese bikes are a great deal, until they start looking for parts. Yes I've been there and done that. I sold (or pretty much gave away) several Japanese bikes because I could not get parts to keep them going. You can improvise some things, but that can only go so far.
    #28
  9. Paebr332

    Paebr332 Good news everyone!

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    Deming dealt with the system of production. He spent his entire life preaching continuous improvement in quality and efficiency through the reduction of variation. It had NOTHING to do with planned obsolescence.

    Don't try to dress your personal opinions in the clothes of people you obviously have never studied. Your use of Deming's full first name was a real clue to those of us who have studied the man and his teachings that you have done neither.
    #29
  10. Hengky

    Hengky n00b

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Hiii Bru, sorry so late to reply .
    Yes, i have some detail to explain the left side.
    maybe more easier to see if you click my youtube link on
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APqiHbhw3Fs

    here my email
    sigmatrex@gmail.com , if you need more image .

    thanks for your kindly comment bruu
    #30