Hot weather ATGATT solutions.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by samadams0824, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    They can't send the olympia back? That sounds like BS to me. I've returned tons of olympia stuff that didn't fit the way I wanted from online retailers.



    Yes, the same goes for when the sun goes down around here, especially on days in the low 90's or mid 80's. It hits the mid-low 60's very fast and if you don't have a liner with you, you'll be much colder than you'd like - particularly on the highway.
    #81
  2. TheOutsider

    TheOutsider jujubees

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    +1 on the SmartWool socks. Night and day difference, I won't ride without them when going more than a few miles.

    I'm also here in the oppressively hot and humid state of NC; I went just shy of a 1k ride over 2 days last week with a Tourmaster Draft mesh jacket and the Carhartt pants mentioned earlier in this thread. When temps hit 95 or higher, it got tough. Soaking a shirt/bandana is great but it only lasts 30 or 45 minutes at highway speeds... at least on my Aprilia Futura, where the windscreen doesn't do very much to help. The mesh did more harm than good, which surprised me. (and then I find this thread explaining why...)

    Commuting to and from work? Mesh is *great* for me. Distance of any sort? I'm going to try something different next time. I'm told staying constantly hydrated (i.e., Camelbak) will work better than any sort of exterior cooling, but I have yet to test that theory. Comes from an IBR rider or two, so I suppose I should try it...

    As always, YMMV...
    #82
  3. larry0071

    larry0071 Been here awhile

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    I buy from my local dealer that sales me the bikes as well. They deal with Tucker Rocky or something... and they said that Tucker does not do Olympia so they would have to go to another source that would not allow them to bring the pants in for me to touch and feel and then send back if I were to decide to go for the FirstGear.

    They have the Firstgear on the way, so I'll be touching them and trying them on Thursday. I have already seen from another post/thread that there is a large follwing for the Olympia Airglide 3 pants, and because I'm not seeing them side by side I was hoping someone that may have had both could tell me what was the redeeming feature of the Olympia compared to the Firstgear. Price is the same, at about $185 for each pant, so I can't really use my inherant cheapness to make the call!
    #83
  4. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    The nice thing about hydrating so much is your body can keep sweating. The really nice thing about hydrating is you don't get the fatigue, poor reaction time, bad judgement, and headaches from dehydration on top of the heat.

    You can still pour a cup of ice water over your head at stops - a liter or so of frigid water on the scalp over a minute and a half will suck more specific heat out of your body than you'd expect, provided you're standing in the shade while you do it. The splash on your shirt and neck help once you get moving.

    If you don't mind getting soaked, a few cubes of ice in chest pockets on mesh will give you a bit of cooling and some soaking that will evaporate, just don't use too much or you'll soak your pants - unless you want to soak your pants :evil




    That price is well below the MSRP of the airglide 3's, and Olympia usually has a pretty tight stranglehold on pricing as they only use "Dealers" rather than regular retailers. That might have something to do with it.
    #84
  5. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

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    +1 :clap for Olympia gear.

    I have a Tourmaster Epic jacket and Flex pants. Both have given me problems with the zippers breaking, and the Velcro on the jacket is pulling away on the sleeve cuffs. I bought this jacket in September last year. Not impressed with these, especially since I bought them based on Tourmaster's reputation.

    I got an Olympia mesh jacket in the spring because the Epic was too heavy for summer. I love this jacket -- it even cleans up better (on the hi-viz sections).

    I just got some Olympia pants for a trip. The armor seems a bit flimsy, so I'll swap out the knee/shin pads.
    #85
  6. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

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    A question from a friend new to riding: Does anyone know if hockey gear is equal in protectiveness to MC-specific gear? It looks a lot alike to me, if you don't look at the manufacturer's names.
    #86
  7. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

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    When people ask me, "Aren't you DYING in all that gear?" this is exactly what I tell them.

    They usually just blink at me and don't say another word. I hope this means they're thinking about it -- and all their friends who ride around in shorts and tan tops and sneakers.

    I'm just sayin'...
    #87
  8. Phoebus30

    Phoebus30 First Timer

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    I'll admit I do wear shorts when I ride but I do wear a full helmet, gloves, and a joe rocket armour jacket it's still hot and I do sweat but the jacket is mesh so I'm comfortable when I'm on the go just not when I come to a stop lol
    #88
  9. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

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    I understand why mesh is a bad idea in extreme heat. But if I'm on a long trip with variable weather in July or August, is there a way to make the mesh work?

    I took a long trip with my Olympia mesh jacket and Tourmaster mesh pants. I used a CamelBak and soaked my Nike DriFit shirt at every fuel stop. That seemed to work. Should I be wearing a long-sleeved shirt?

    My next trip will include a Fieldsheer evap vest.

    When I say variable weather, I mean Jasper, Canada to the Badlands in SD and points hot and cold in between.

    Thanks for any advice sent this way!
    #89
  10. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Just block some of the air flow. And Yes, I would recommend trying a long sleave shirt.
    #90
  11. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

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    I'm going to cut and paste another member's explanation for this. The reply was to a similar question in this thread in the equipment forum by der_saeufer. This is the first time this concept has been explained to me in a way that made sense. It is making me re-examine my views on mesh.

    #91
  12. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    I recently picked up a cooling vest at Cycle Gear for $9.95. It works great under a mesh jacket. Soak it in water and it will keep you cool for much longer than a wet T- shirt. I rode for an hour in 90+ temps/100+ heat index. It was still pretty wet after an hour. I'll be trying it on a longer ride this weekend.
    If it drys out, just stop and soak it again.
    #92
  13. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    The ones I found there were $40?
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  14. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    The Cycle Gear house brand used to be MotoBoss, now it's Bilt. They were clearing out the MotoBoss vests for $9.95. Best I could tell they were identical to the $40 Bilt vests which are now on sale for $30. The $9.95 vests are probably all gone.
    #94
  15. der_saeufer

    der_saeufer ?איפה בירה

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    Pasted from my followup in the other thread:

    After re-reading my post today I do feel compelled to point out that mesh is NOT always a bad thing. If you're riding in town or doing some lower-speed riding (e.g. slow forest roads), that added airflow helps your sweat evaporate, especially where it's humid. When you're riding the slab across Arizona, though, too much of a good thing can literally kill you from heatstroke and dehydration. Mesh also helps evaporative cooling vests work better--you're trying to evaporate a hell of a lot more water with one of those than a sweaty t-shirt.
    #95
  16. eskimo

    eskimo gunga-galunga

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    Good info. in this thread. Only thing I can add is a nice starting point to the day: Stick helmet in your home freezer before heading out. Adds a cold start to a hot day. Don't tell my wife.
    #96
  17. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

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    Thanks Cliffy - and everyone else. This DOES make sense.

    So the DriFit shirt should be reserved for rainy weather when I need to dry out quickly and the long-sleved Merino wool shirt is what I want for a sunny day.

    Yay! I can't wait to see how disappointed my riding partner are when I stop wearing wet t-shirts. ; )
    #97
  18. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    If you have a windshield, mesh will work for you. Otherwise, as DAKEZ indicated, do something to block the direct airflow at the front of the jacket. Place some sort of wind-blocking layer between the jacket and your shirt. I wouldn't cover the back, as that is a good place for cooling evaporation from low-speed airflow.

    My gear is mesh top and bottom, and I ride year round in it.

    Last weekend it touched 110 on the way home from a 300+ mile lunch run. Under the jacket I was wearing an REI wool T-shirt, cotton skivvies, and Smartwool socks. That's it for under layers in the Texas heat for me.

    Behind the windshield I think that only parts of my arms and legs are in any direct airflow and this seemed to be supported by the fact that at gas stops when I unzipped my jacket the T-shirt was patchy with sweat spots, neither soaked nor dry. I imagine that my core temp remains more constant as the body is adjusting blood flow to the extremities being used as radiators and swamp coolers out in the breeze. But then, I do have a vivid imagination. :wink:

    After the ride it seemed that I stayed as comfortable as one likely could in this environment, drinking lots of water and unsweetened tea throughout the day. Probably something like a gallon and a half of total fluids consumed, though I was still a little dehydrated.

    My gal, riding her own bike and being considerably smaller, seemed to suffer more from heat build-up and fatigue wearing her mesh gear behind a windshield. The mesh was supplemented with one of Frog Togs' triangle thingies that you soak in water and wear around the neck and drape down the body in front or back. That thing would dry to a hard chamois state in less than an hour.

    I don't think she consumed more than a half gallon of fluids, and some of that was soda rather than water. When we got home her skin was still hot to the touch after laying exposed to the A/C for ten minutes. Not a good sign. Gonna have to emphasize/encourage drinking more water, Gatorade, etc. on future trips in the heat.

    Another difference between she and I is that I mountain bike, and my body is accustomed to shedding heat. She spends most of her time indoors and doesn't follow any athletic pursuits. This may play as big of a part as anything in preparedness for managing temperature extremes.

    The body will adjust the internal systems and plumbing to manage the environment it usually spends time in. A sedentary life has little call for high blood flow, sweat production, etc., and those public utilities may not be up to the task of dealing with suddenly imposed extremes.

    Physical fitness may be another aspect of temperature management that doesn't get as much attention, yet could be helpful as well.
    #98
  19. DireWolf

    DireWolf Knees in the Breeze

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    Not sure if it's been posted in here, but this just got rave reviews from someone riding in 115* weather/125*-ish heat index. He didn't break a sweat.

    http://www.veskimo.com/
    #99
  20. HouseOfDexter

    HouseOfDexter Flatlander

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    I have a VEskimo...I love it...but I can't get my riding buddies to fork over the $500 investment, so I don't do much long distance riding when the temps get over 95F+...I've done over 12+ hours over 2 days(all super slab)...with temperatures averaging 98F with the VEskimo...and froze my butt off...I recommend getting the adjustable cooling controller :eek1. It will also allow the ice to last longer...

    I have the 9qt cooler...think I'm going to get the backpack so I can do some dirt bike riding when it gets hot...