How do I unload the HF table lift by myself?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by MaestroPNW, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. Bokrijder

    Bokrijder Soyez sans que peur

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    Used the front bucket on my backhoe -- I'm sure that helps you out.

    Couple 2x6s for ramps - too much friction, grease the planks - if you have to move any distance, move to rollers.
    a bar for prying and inching the crate along
    Come-along if you have an anchor point

    Watch the toes and fingers - maybe not wise to have kids around - remember even some adults can be kids.

    Bokrijder
    #21
  2. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    On the other end of the scale, if you have to think about this, maybe having a bike lift isn't a good idea for you? Not being snarky just wistfully opining. 339lbs is not real problematic. Have the store put the crate in the truck the way you want for easier unloading. Slide the heavy end of the crate out first and down the 2 long 2x6x10/12'. That ought to be enough leverage to get the light end down to the floor without killing oneself. Kick a fulcrum under the 2x6's to catch some weight if you need to?
    #22
  3. FixerDave

    FixerDave KLR650 - XR200R

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    I've bought lots of stuff that was too heavy to move. No problem... all you need is time, smarts, and maybe some steel-toed boots :D

    Seriously... I moved 4'x10'x1/4" steel plate (4 sheets of the stuff) by trailer. Had 6 guys help me load it (helpful bunch, $25 per sheet) but unloaded myself. A big tree, a little chain, some bolts... hook up, drive away, CLANG!, backup, repeat. On the ground, a wrecking bar gave enough leverage to push them into place (I now have a steel driveway). I unloaded a crated mill (450lb) from a van... just slid it down some 2x4s. One inch at a time, ropes to keep things from moving too far, a little bit of prying this way and that to move said inch.

    A little brains and going slow, making sure you have a plan for what comes next (once you start, --stuff-- will come next), is all I've ever really used. Of course, I do have an engine hoist, and a chain hoist, and chains, and ropes, and tie-downs (which get used for everything but the bike these days)... Never actually needed those boots, but I wear 'em just in case. Sooner or latter, as they say.

    If you're in a rush or don't have any ideas... or your last few ideas didn't work out so well... maybe best to get professional help. :lol3 When in doubt, watch some YouTube... should give you plenty of ideas about what not to do and how things can go horribly wrong... Sorry, this is probably sliding into unhelpful territory :rofl

    David...
    #23
  4. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    I had a friend pick mine up for me on a out of town trip so he had to help me get it out of his truck. :D :evil
    #24
  5. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

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    So I assume the OP does not have a pickup truck or trailer. In a choice of a Home Depot flatbed truck or a U-haul, the U-haul wins hands down. The bed height is probably half as tall as the Depot flatbed. Plus,the U-haul has a ramp,and that is a winner if the ramp is wider than the bike lift. A few pieces of PVC pipes under the cargo,and it should move easily.
    Take a few 2x4 blocks to place under the motorcycle lift when they load it,and easier still.
    #25
  6. groop

    groop So much to ponder

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    Have any furniture dollies? You know, the ones with four casters? I had help unloading my lift out of my truck bed but I still needed to move it up the driveway and into the garage by myself. Since the lift is unassembled in the crate, simply removing the crate and rolling it on its own was not an option. Anyhow, the furniture dollies helped.
    #26
  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    HF has some. They are cheap, but good!

    http://www.harborfreight.com/movers-dolly-93888.html
    [​IMG]

    Jim :brow
    #27
  8. Tim McKittrick

    Tim McKittrick Long timer

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    #28
  9. Vankaye

    Vankaye n00b on the move

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    I have the Handy BOB lift. Quite a bit heavier than the HF lift and had to use an engine hoist to unload it.
    I've transported that lift many times as we use it at trade-shows to display bikes. It take at least 4 strong guys to get it off the pallet!

    One tip I could give is to strap around the entire lift and legs before you move it. That way it won't try to open up on you while you're moving it.
    #29
  10. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    This is the way I did it alone. Just think about what you're doing, plan your steps, and take your time.
    #30
  11. sleazy rider

    sleazy rider Squidly Adventurer

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    Wow, I brought mine home in the back of my Ford Focus ZX-4. Removed it myself too. Pulled the crate out as far as I could, set that end on the ground and wrestled the other end to the side and set it down. It's not that hard if you don't fear a hernia. :lol3. For the record, I'm 5'8" and 170# soaking wet with a couple rocks in my pocket.
    #31
  12. leewildwater

    leewildwater rrrrRide Man rrrrRide

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    Exactly what I did. I used the one the window AC unit sits on in the winter plus one I keep a couple storage bins on. Put heavy en toward back of truck at store, slid onto dollies, rolled lighter end to tail gate the lowered down to floor.
    #32
  13. Stkmkt1

    Stkmkt1 Been here awhile

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    Congrats on your purchase of the HF lift. I've had mine for 3 years now. Works like a champ. I did like a few others did. Forklifted it into the Avalanche at the store. When I got home, I just opened it up and tooks parts out one at a time. Eventually, it got down to man-handling the last big parts by hand. Not really a big deal.

    I actually roll mine out of my shop into the driveway all the time when I'm working in my shop. Shop is a full woodshop that also is where I park my four motorcycles. Each time I roll it out or bring it back in I have to pick one end up and drag it back into the garage as the garage floor is higher than the driveway.

    The thing is a beast. I also bought for around $40 on sale at HF, a [​IMG] wheel chock. Bolted it to the front of the lift. I just roll the bikes up on the lift and into the wheel chock. Then strap them in place. Works great.
    #33
  14. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Another great use for the ligt:

    [​IMG]

    I use it for a lot of different things, including a tire changer!:deal

    Jim :brow
    #34
  15. Wirewiz

    Wirewiz Adventurer

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    Couldn't resist :doh Back your delivery vehicle up to where you want it and slide one end out until it almost wants to tip out. Then slowly let one end down, then pick up the other and with your Legs slowly set it on top of a 2x4 on the floor. 2x4 will save your fingers. I do this stuff all the time in my shop by myself. It's a "can of corn". Guess I work by myself way too much. I'm in Oly if your close let me know I'll help. I have a pick me truck too.

    Good luck. Wiz
    #35
  16. everycredit

    everycredit Been here awhile

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    If you have a truck, lower the tailgate and back into your garage.

    Have a second person help you make sure no one is in front of your path or going to enter your path soon.

    Put the truck in first gear, rev engine to 2200 rpm, drop clutch, and punch the accelerator.

    HF table in garage. If you're lucky, it may become unpacked for you.
    #36
  17. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    get a cherry picker ... get a good one that folds up, out of the way in between uses.

    primary objective is not to hurt yourself, secondary is to get it unloaded.
    #37
  18. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

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    Ever watch the cop car scene in American Graffiti??? It could be a "hold my beer, and watch this" moment.


    In all seriousness, when you need a cushion to drop something off a truck, car tires work great. Many moons ago I worked at a dealership and we got our oil in 55 gallon drums, all we did was stack 3 tires on top of one another, and roll the drum out of the truck and on to the tires. Worked like a charm.
    #38
  19. Brisco

    Brisco Chik'n Eater

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    Jeez!!!
    I'm not sure why everyone is making this a bigger production than it needs to be...

    HF loaded mine in the back of my son's S-10, heavy end to the back.
    I got home, backed it into the garage, my 17 year old and I slid it back until one end rested on the floor, each of us got on either side and slid it out the rest of the way and set it on the floor.

    I uncrated it, put the caster on by myself.
    #39
  20. MaestroPNW

    MaestroPNW Me!

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    I guess I was overthinking this. Rented a 5x9 trailer instead of a truck - lower deck, and no mileage charge too (and no extra gas). Backed it up right to the garage door - by far the most tricky part of the ordeal :D, uncrated the lift and just dragged it off. The bottom part of the crate served as a slide, sort of.

    Thank you everybody for replies and suggestions!
    #40