How do you heat your garage?

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Proettermann, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. locopny

    locopny Adventurer

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    They sell insulation kits at the home improvement box stores, or you can cut your own from foam in the desired R value you seek. My door came insulated from factory and purchased from a scratch and dent pile. No scratch or dents...just missing instructions that were available on line. Nice way to save $400.
    #21
  2. atokad

    atokad wan⋅der⋅lust

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    Hot Dawg gas furnace, can be seen in back corner. Insulated and sheet rocked the walls.Insulated the garage doors by gluing fitted pieces of 3/4 in styrofoam to them as seen in front of the bikes.
    IMG_0234.JPG
    IMG_0235.JPG
    #22
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  3. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    I built from scratch and chose a natural gas unit heater. Dollar for dollar it seemed like the best bang for my buck. Gas is by far the cheapest BTU.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    So far it's working great. The block walls have R11 and R38 in the ceiling. The doors were pretty expensive and provide R11 or something like that.
    Someday I may add a radiant tube heater (like the one pictured below) right above the work bench area for a more direct warm and fuzzy.

    [​IMG]
    #23
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  4. MountainsandRivers

    MountainsandRivers loves dirty things!

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    My awesome radiates enough to make it comfy!

    And a little electric heater fan in the work area, in my insulated garage makes up for deficiencies in my awesomeness..
    #24
  5. Merfman

    Merfman Trustin' my cape...

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    My setup... pole barn, no insulation, concrete floor with cushy tiles... radiant heat can be seen in this pic, the only lights in the pic, upper left and upper right...
    [​IMG]
    #25
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  6. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    What are those? I need to heat my "office" area separately from the main shop.
    #26
  7. Merfman

    Merfman Trustin' my cape...

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    From my previous post on page 1:
    I have infra-red from these guys: http://infratech-usa.com/ - had them for almost 10 years now... can't imagine having anything else...
    #27
  8. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    Where can you get them in CO? Or at least check them out?
    #28
  9. Merfman

    Merfman Trustin' my cape...

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    I have no idea.... I did everything through the website. You might contact them to see if they have any distributors in CO...
    #29
  10. OrangeDreamCycler

    OrangeDreamCycler .......Explorer of Options.......

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    I can vouch for them
    They are HOT.
    I pulled off an emergency waterpump
    C-section in there one Winter night.
    Must of been 10 below with windchill.
    I operated in complete Comfort.
    Thanks Merfy.
    Out doing Chopping.
    I heat mine the old fashioned way .
    image.jpeg
    #30
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  11. _CJ

    _CJ Retrogrouch

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    The downside to radiant heaters is that they don't heat the air. They only heat the objects their rays touch. Feels great when you're standing under them, but liquids in cabinets will freeze solid, tools inside cabinets will be painfully cold, if you have any need for precision measurements you're going to have to use something else to heat them up to proper temp.

    Long story short, they're okay as a secondary "feel good" heat source, but aren't going to get the job done unless you leave them on 24/7 and get some sort of residual heat effect from all the objects in the room being heated.

    At least, that's my experience with them.
    #31
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  12. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra

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    I have an attached garage in West Yellowstone. Has a really tall roof and uninsulated exterior walls so radiant heat from above sounds good. I went on the website above and can't find pricing info. I've tried using a small portable radiant heater - I turn it on and start working on the bike an hour or so later but only one side is sort of warm. The radiant heat from above sounds like the ticket if it's not TOO expen$ive
    #32
  13. Merfman

    Merfman Trustin' my cape...

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    On another site, infratechheatersusa.com they list the 3K watt at $639 each... ouch. I think I gave around $250-$300/ea... they also listed the 6K watt one at a similar price so... maybe a bait-n-switch kinda thing...

    What CJ said about heating the air is correct. I had no desire to heat my 36X40' barn, only my moto workspace so stuff freezes. I can use the heaters, comfortably down to around 15-20... anything lower is just a little bit brisk...

    When I called them, they were extremely helpful in helping me decide what I needed and their guidance was spot-on... I've been very happy.

    Edit-addy:
    INFRATECH CORPORATE OFFICE
    15700 South Figueroa Street
    Gardena CA 90248

    800-421-9455 or 310-354-1250
    FAX 310-523-3674

    sales@infratech-usa.com
    #33
  14. Retired and lovin it

    Retired and lovin it Been here awhile

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  15. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    I asked my plumber about it and he said no, the inspector didn't say anything about it either. He did make me put a piece of hard pipe coming out of the box as opposed to the flex line going into the box.
    I did open the valve up and let it blow before hooking up to the heater and got some crap out.
    #35
  16. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I live high up in the mountains and my attached garage came with in floor radiant heating, but it was not connected.

    Now that it's connected and working it's freaking perfect. Dial in whatever temp I want. Pretty reasonable heating costs too, which surprised me. Obviously not retro fit-able, but a great solution if you're starting from scratch.

    Nothing like having a warm place to fix shit over winter!
    #36
  17. _CJ

    _CJ Retrogrouch

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    hmmmm, wonder if it would be possible to make a retrofitable radiant floor system? 1/2 tubing with a raised tile system of some sort over it, and a stand alone heater/fluid pump that sits in the corner?

    Anyone have a million dollars they want to invest? :lol2


    .
    #37
  18. OrangeDreamCycler

    OrangeDreamCycler .......Explorer of Options.......

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    They actually make retrofits for crawl spaces that will turn wood flooring into radiant.
    I knew someone in Rockrimmon that did it. It was a pita. Worked well once all the quirks were
    Ironed out.
    #38
  19. ROAD DAMAGE

    ROAD DAMAGE Long timer

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    Have used this Warmboard system in a few houses. https://www.warmboard.com/warmboard-s
    Still not sure how I feel about it .............. as I've never lived in a house with it?
    It's expensive, but relatively quick after "climbing the learning curve". The layer of aluminum is considered the "heat conductor".

    Our go to heat system is normally either a "staple up" system that has the radiant heat tubing fastened in the joist bays of the floor system,........ OR the 2" x 2" grid on the floor system where the tubing is "stapled down" and then has gypcrete poured and screeded over it. Then it gets another layer of plywood on top of that. (Usually gets a double bottom plate on the walls to keep the height near the same.)

    For a garage I think it's still easiest to install tubing in a concrete slab. I was pouring a concrete driveway at my place in 2002 and I just went ahead and put the tubing in the slab as I had a some leftover from a few jobs. I was already using rebar in the slab so all it cost me was some zip ties and about another 200' of tubing to finish up. I didn't hook up the heat system for the drive for another 6-7 years. I just kept the tubing capped and sealed to keep critters out of it. I still don't use it often (maybe once/twice a year) but it's there if I want to turn it on. It'll be a nice resale feature for some lazy bastard when I sell this place. But I'm sorta a plan ahead guy like that. I've also got a 4" piece of PVC that's just capped off that goes under the driveway from one side of the yard to the other. If I ever need to install something electrical, or something for an irrigation system, it's ALREADY under there .............. I won't have to tear up a driveway. And the stick of PVC and caps only cost me about $25 when I did it.

    But the single best thing I did for garage heat ............. was to locate the mechanical room for my house in the corner of the attached garage. I put a louvered door on the mech. room so all of the heat that's lost from the boiler and it's exposed copper piping ................... goes right into the garage. :bubba :wings :jkam And it's all living space above the garage so it also helps keep the upstairs floors warmer. The colder it is outside, the more the boiler works, and the warmer the garage is! Brilliant! I also invested in nice insulated garage doors and nice supple weatherstripping for them so that they seal well. Over all it's very inexpensive and cost effective. In the last several years boilers have gotten better, much more efficient, and less expensive. People poo poo boilers but it's pretty simple to have a LP gas tank set next to a free standing garage and a boiler system thermostat on a timer.

    Stay toasty out there amigos!
    #39
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  20. ROAD DAMAGE

    ROAD DAMAGE Long timer

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    I could actually see this happening ............... but I'd want to have remesh fastened to the existing concrete slab, then zip tie the radiant tubing to the remesh, and then have at least 2.5" of concrete with plenty of fiber in it poured over that. Hard part would be maintaining the edges and transitions of the new slab. Would need to cut control joints in the thin slab so it's imperative to keep the tubing from 'floating up" into the concrete .......... lots of zip ties.

    And I'd do it all for the insanely low, low price .................................. of a quarter million dollars! :D

    RD
    #40