How do you make a Triumph Tiger 1050 into a Dual Sport?

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by interactive3, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. interactive3

    interactive3 Adventurer

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    What would make the Triumph Tiger 1050 a better dual sport bike for more off road capability?

    Perhaps a better question is what makes a bike more capable than another in the dirt, sand and mud, over hilly and uneven terrain. I think there's the cockpit/riding position, such as the foot peg position and handlebar position. You have to be able to give the motorcycle good input. Then there's the geometry, suspension, wheels and tires. Let's leave the engine, transmission and electrical system out of the discussion.

    The tires could be changed out to something that works better off road. That would be the easiest single change. The front wheel could be changed out to a 21". Changing the wheel size would create a slacker, slower responding head angle (or rake/trail angle). I get the impression forks could be slid up higher in the triple clamp to lessen the change from a larger wheel.

    The suspension seems pretty easy to bottom out, so I think there would need to be some adjustments. Without my riding gear on I weigh 165 lbs. Does the suspension need to be better in all aspects, or can it be tuned to be better off road? Is it a matter of adjusting preload, sag, and compression?

    The bike itself is pretty light. I think it's even lighter than a V-Strom.

    Off road capability of motorcycles has come a long way. Adventurous riders were riding some pretty basic machines off road back in the day. Maybe it's all about tires and a positive attitude :thumb. The Tiger 1050 seems to have a foundation that could make for an okay "dual sport" rather than "sport touring" as it seems to be now.

    You may be prompted to tell me to sell the bike and get a "real" off road machine. What I'm interested in knowing is WHAT differences are making dual sport bikes more capable off road.

    Thanks in advance for your input, and enjoy the ride.
    #1
  2. SlipChip

    SlipChip Adventure Commuter

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    Take the name badges off, sell the rest of the bike, stick badges on WR250R.


    Seriously though, why bugger up a nice street bike?
    #2
  3. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    There is only One in existence ... and it's here in San Rafael, CA. And it's for sale. It's your lucky day:

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.481170199927.266569.62228149927&type=3

    I've sat on this bike and looked at it closely. It's perfect and a very well done custom. Looks factory everywhere. Top shelf components.
    Not much on the net about it. The guys at Hattar motors built it up themselves. 19" front spoke wheel, spoke 17" rear ... or is it an 18" ? Not sure.

    New forks, discs, longer travel front and rear. TKC 80 Conti's on there. The FMF loses about 15 lbs. (stock muffler) Fat bars, crash bars. Needs a bash plate, hand guards and a few other things to really tread off road. But it looks super cool. No idea how it actually rides. Very tricky getting into changing steering geometry.

    If it was me ... I'd go with the 800XC. I own an '07 1050. Love it, but would never consider taking it into any serious off road. I tip toe even on nice gravel roads and shit myself in mud or sand or ruts. NG big Tiger!

    The 800XC? Fantastic in nasty stuff. Rides right through it, tracks straight, turns easy, stays hooked up. Nice.
    #3
  4. 2tallnwide

    2tallnwide Long timer

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    Why go to all that trouble, just trade it to me for my '05 Tiger....:deal

    (I know, I know...it ain't a dual sport either...can't blame a guy fer tryin' :D )
    #4
  5. precarious

    precarious Been here awhile

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    Oh, my word... that is hot! :tb

    TKC 80s are available in Tiger size. That really ought to be enough to start.
    #5
  6. interactive3

    interactive3 Adventurer

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    Chip, Nice TDM. Do you take it in the dirt, or is it an on road machine?
    #6
  7. Dcc46

    Dcc46 Been here awhile

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    That 1050 is really nice, Well Done Hattar Motorsports
    #7
  8. SlipChip

    SlipChip Adventure Commuter

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    Thanks. It's a little rough actually but I like it that way, not scared to take it somewhere stupid and drop it.

    I am happy to ride the TDM on rough dirt and gravel roads, but I steer away from quad trails or single track.


    More on topic, I should think that if you put on a larger diameter wheel on the front you would loose suspension travel unless you also put on longer fork tubes.
    #8
  9. fozzie1050

    fozzie1050 n00b

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    I have to agree with everyone else, keep the Tiger 1050 on the road...and pick up a true off-road bike for the knarly stuff. My 1050 is a great sports touring machine that allows me to have fun in the twisities...there's not way I'd consider it a dual sport on a regular basis.

    The new 800 really fills the niche Triumph needed. Howvere, I must say, that Hattar bike is really friggin sweet!:clap
    #9
  10. fbj913

    fbj913 On the Beemer Kool-Aid

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    OOOH!!:clap
    #10
  11. buffamazon

    buffamazon n00b

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    That Hattar custom is certainly droolworthy. Love how it looks with those spoked wheels and the matte paint. Grrrr.
    #11
  12. 5150esses

    5150esses leotarded

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    Wasn't sure how I'd handle Dust 2 Dawson on a 1050, especially given limited dirt experience. At the last minute added some TKCs and a bash plate.

    I had some great crash bars from Thunderbike, New Zealand, but it looks as though they don't make crash bars for Tigers anymore.

    Long story short, it'll do more than I will, even overloaded.

    Swapping the TKCs back out for PR3s now that the dirt part of summer is over.

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. rickf

    rickf oldfatguyMAN

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    I think the fundamental problem you'll have is weight distribution. Bikes meant for off-road will have a significantly larger portion of the weight distributed to the rear. That's a pretty tough one to change.
    The very thing that makes it work so well on the street works against you off-road.
    #13
  14. yokesman

    yokesman Been here awhile

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    Several tigers have done the RTW,if a sportster can be adventurized ,the tiger is certainly way ahead.
    #14
  15. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Yes and No. The Sportster has a lower CG and is lower overall. Sure, ground clearance is not good but the low CG means pretty easy going on rough dirt tracks, mud and loose stuff. And the massive weight means good traction at the rear, less clutch slipping. Belt drive could be an issue too ... not sure on that one.

    The relatively TOP HEAVY Tiger is hard to handle off road (for me), especially at slow speeds. Both my earlier Tigers where far better off road (1995, 885 Steamer, 1999, 885 F.I Girlie) with their 19" front tires. Top heavy still, but doable. The old Steamer was best of the bunch and as good as a GS off road (IMO). I rode an 1150 vs. Steamer Tiger back to back.
    Much prefer the Tiger!

    I like the 1050 for road touring ... and it could do RTW if you avoided rough dirt routes. I'm short of leg so my Tiger is TALL for me to start with. And that is another area the Sportster beats out the Tiger: It's set down low to the ground, so you can paddle along in sand and mud. Been there, seen guys do it. Sure, they bang their undercarriage up ... but they don't fall over!

    If the Tiger had a 19" or 21" front, that would really help it everywhere off road. But that would make it even TALLER! Good for BIG GUYS with long ... and very strong legs. She's a heavy girl and once she starts falling ... get out the way! :lol3

    For paved road sport touring, IMO, the 1050 Tiger, once set up, is still a good and INEXPENSIVE choice today. Great used bargains out there. And ... if you do the homework, all basic services can be DIY! a big plus, IMO.
    #15
  16. Drunk_Uncle

    Drunk_Uncle Long timer

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    That sweet wire wheeled Tiger was at D2D this year and I missed it? That thing is awesome. I would love to somehow fit an FMF to my 06 955i.

    #16