how do you stay comfortable on the scooter?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by damasovi, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    HI,

    well the question is simple. I want to know how you stay comfortable on your scooter. I have hwy pegs that help, a windshield and on longer rides use a kineybelt (barrow from the MX department)

    So what do you do to stay confortable longer?

    Damasovi
    #1
  2. Phipsd

    Phipsd Been here awhile

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    My Citycom is pretty comfy for my six/four stock with a decent seat, good ergos, a good stock touring windshield and enough room for my large self to be able to move around when I want to thanks to a 59 inch wheelbase and an upright riding position.

    With my AirHawk, I'm good to go cross country. A couple of weeks ago I put 600 km on it in a days ride in the British Columbia mountains. In a couple of weeks I will be heading 1000km east to the Rocky Mts then north through Banff and Jasper to Yukon and then south on the Cassier Hwy.

    This bike is less tiring to ride the distance for my 60 year old self than my V-Strom 1000 or my C90 bagger. So my number one recommendation for comfort is to buy a comfortable bike.
    #2
  3. gogogordy

    gogogordy Long timer

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    Yup, UnderArmor underwear.
    #3
  4. gumshoe4

    gumshoe4 Been here awhile

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    I have a Beadrider seat cover on the SWing and I generally shove my feet all the way forward. I find that seating position very comfortable and I can maintain it for long periods of time. If I need to, I just move my feet back on the boards for awhile. I have a Givi AirFlow windshield which also works great and allows me to maximize or minimize airflow. In winter, I wear a heavy textile armored jacket and a liner, if it's really cold...in summer, an armored mesh jacket. All of these things maximize my comfort in any season while maintaining protection levels. They seem to work well.
    #4
  5. scootrboi

    scootrboi Long timer

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    The contoured seats on the modern scooters look like they keep the rider in one spot. I need to move back and forth a little now and then. I don't know why the stepped seats caught on, seems all the scooters have them.
    #5
  6. Dabears

    Dabears --------------------

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    I ride my BMW. Seriously. Nobody can accuse a P200e of being a cush ride for long distances. You guys with bigger scooters make me jealous.

    ABS, headed grips and a tall windshield have ruined me. :lol3
    #6
  7. k3ith

    k3ith Been here awhile

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    Good long underwear are a must for an extra layer of padding and warmth (I tend to ride more in the spring and fall than the summer for some odd reasaon) and stretching out and taking up the whole seat helps too. Stepped seats are ok but only if there's room to put your feet up. Lots of breaks helps too; I'm rarely in so much of a hurry that I can't stop for a few minutes every half hour or so.
    #7
  8. Qaz

    Qaz Been here awhile

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    The first thing is to have a scooterr that fits you and is comfortable. I have 2 inches of foam pad that I add to the seat on trips, not that the seat is uncomfortable, but my legs are long and it gives me more leg room on a 400 Burgman. The other thing is an Mp3 player, music takes my mind off of the little things. Although a maxi scooter is a great all around transport, it can not match the comfort of a touring motorcycle. Now throw on an electronic cruise control, a taller more comfortable seat, add a bigger shield and a stereo, I might change my mind. The 650 isn't quite big enough either, but it is going the right direction.
    #8
  9. tortoise2

    tortoise2 Been here awhile

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    The Yamaha Zuma 125 has a relatively flat seat, compared to the typical stepped configurations.

    [​IMG]
    #9
  10. Dranrab Luap

    Dranrab Luap E-Tarded Super Moderator

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    Wear padded bicycle shorts. I can't do distance rides without them.
    #10
  11. andoulli

    andoulli CAJUN

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    A few years back I took an old pair of sweat pants and cut them off at the thigh. I asked my wife to sew two layers of quilted material into the seat of the cut off sweat pants. I combine this with fleece lined jeans for extra butt padding. This layering when riding my FJR with Corbin allows for all day comfort. The same with my Silverwing with Airhawk, all day comfort. The air hawk is a huge improvement over the factory Honda seat.
    #11
  12. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I never had any comfort issues on my Vino 125 or Zuma 125. I have done 400 mile days on the Vino. The Stella however is not so comfortable. The long narrow hard as a rock seat is a part of the problem, but the biggest issue is the riding position. The seat is high, and the bars are to low, forcing you to lean forward. Not like a sport bike, but enough to cause some comfort problems after a while. I see no easy way to fix it, the bars on a Stella can't be replaced. Fortunately, it is the one scooter I don't ride very far at the time, I don't consider it reliable enough to get to far from home on.

    The Zuma seat is flat side to side, but slopes downward quite a bit from front to back. Even with a 34" inseam, I can just barely touch the ground when sitting on the back part of it. I also have highway pegs on the Zuma which help comfort a bit and leave the floor open to carry stuff.
    #12
  13. LarryRickenbacker

    LarryRickenbacker Been here awhile

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    Howdy,

    I'm strictly an urban commuter/ errand runner on my Honda Sh150i. When seat fatigue gets the best of me, I simply look for the nearest Whataburger and enjoy a big Diet Coke and small burger. It works for me, but obviously YMMV. :1drink
    #13
  14. Tarka

    Tarka Doesn't wave back.

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    Ok,my 650 Burgman Executive is as comfy as my favourite armchair at home,so no bother there.

    However,in February I rode one of my PX125s 930 miles to a rally in Germany without any fancyarse padded undies or modifications to the seat or scooter,and I had no discomfort at all.

    It must be all you FFs that are having trouble. :evil :lol3
    #14
  15. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Wow that new orange color on the 2014 Zuma 125 looks great. I may have to order those body panels for mine when they become available. It is currently white. It will look like a whole different scooter.
    #15
  16. tortoise2

    tortoise2 Been here awhile

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    This Zuma clone even copied the seat design.

    [​IMG]
    #16
  17. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    They mimic motorcycles; where stepped-seats have been de rigueur for thirty years now.

    With a reason. Simply put, most persons on the pillion seat are...female. The rider's Old Lady or Main Squeeze or Shack-Up.

    Put them on a UJB straight saddle...and what they see during any trip...are sweat-stains on the taller, male, operator's back. But, give them a seat that steps up...they can see over the helmet; can enjoy the ride. The tendency, too, is for them to keep their feet on the pegs at stoplights...making them and the rider safer.

    So...the stepped-seat is here to stay on all but the smallest scooters and a few throwback retro-bikes.
    #17
  18. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Helps on any cycle - a stretch stop. With me, it's coffee.

    Coffee is cheaper and more healthy, given the amount likely to be consumed on a longer trip. Once an hour or so...stop at a likely diner or gas-and-junk store with seats, or even a fast-food outlet (pass on the food, though, unless you're really in need of it). A cup of coffee fights boredom; gets the blood flowing; gets you off the saddle so blood can flow to the nether regions.

    FWIW, this is true even in hot weather. I used to think the old Western-themed movies were ridiculous, when they had the cowboys making hot coffee on a blazing prairie at noon...but hot beverages, unless you're really suffering heatstroke, go down well.

    Cold, not so much - they bite. And the sugar that's in them isn't any good to cool you off either.
    #18
  19. klx250sfguy

    klx250sfguy Been here awhile

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    I bought me one of these. Long, flat seat, strap removed. Comfy ergos. Perfect for around town.

    If I was into highway cruising I would get a Wing. Took one for a test ride today, loved it.

    My '82 Passport

    [​IMG]

    The GoldWing

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I took a BMW C600 out last week. Heated seat and grips, power adjustable windshield, super comfy and easily hit 160k/hr.

    [​IMG]

    Wearing the right gear is also key. I live in Newfoundland and ride in everything but snow.
    #19
  20. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Sounds like my Burgman 650. Except for the heated grips, which I had to have put on myself.

    Cost me $4000-odd. I love German engineering; but I'm not convinced German engineering had much of anything to do with the BMW scoots. Sooooo...:huh...I'll wait.

    The Gold Wing looks like an impressive machine. But, thirsty, too, I'll bet...
    #20