How does one pack a Triumph Tophy SE for 2up and 7-10 days? The wife thinks

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by flyingz06, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. flyingz06

    flyingz06 Been here awhile

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    we don't have enough pannier space for this. suggestions and ideas please!!!
    #1
  2. Bugzy

    Bugzy 2014 VStrom DL1000a

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    If you are thinking of camping i have to agree with her. I fill up my bike riding solo and I use everything I bring except most of the tools, but those are needed.

    With two people you need a larger tent, two air mattresses, two sleeping bags etc etc. Lots of extra space needed.

    One suggestion would be to use the zip lock bags to compress your clothing down to minimum, and bring a minimum of clothes. That would be hard for a female.

    A better option, get her, her own bike to ride.
    #2
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  3. Eyes Shut

    Eyes Shut See no evil

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    Are you camping or staying in motels, or both?

    We travel 2-up on an R1200GS and if just hoteling it, the panniers are sufficient. If camping, we lash two dry bags to the top of the panniers. The dry bags carry a tent, sleeping bags and pads, backpacking pillows, and a Jet Boil and extra fuel. For panniers, we do have large ones, Micatechs. I get one pannier (I'm the passenger) and he gets the other one. I actually have the smaller pannier, with the exhaust cut-out. If your wife is interested, I can list what I take on a trip.
    #3
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  4. justrider

    justrider Been here awhile

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    I give my wife one saddlebag and we split the topcase. The other saddlebag is for our gear. We don't camp really anymore after a grizzly scare in Glacier N. P. If you tend to camp a lot I would say a sport trailer one of the single wheel ones. Your Triumph should have plenty of power and brakes for one.
    #4
  5. Boricua

    Boricua Been here awhile

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    I told my wife to leave the hair dryer and the straightening iron home. She will be wearing a helmet most of the time anyway. Dont need and extra jacket, riding jacket is enough. You normally dress up to go out to a nice restaurant. With motorcycle gear you are already dressed up. Walk in with helmet in hand and you are the envy of everyone in the place.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
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  6. Eyes Shut

    Eyes Shut See no evil

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    True, but sometimes a gal just wants to dress up a little more! I have found several very packable dresses and skirts from Title Nine: https://www.titlenine.com/category/clothing-and-gear/womens-casual-travel-dresses.do
    (I usually take one dress OR one skirt on a trip so I have an alternative to my riding gear.)
    #6
  7. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    For camping, you'll need to stack upward. Bags on top of each pannier, double stacked top case, and a tank bag.

    I can camp solo on my bike with small panniers, a top box, and a large duffel bag on my passenger seat. To carry my wife, I'd have to leave the duffel containing the tent an sleeping bag.

    If you are not camping, you can travel with minimal luggage. If she wants to bring more, you could put the heavy stuff in the panniers, and light weight stuff in a backpack that she would wear.

    If you use one of those light duty tall backpacks used for overnight hikes (the type with almost no frame), the weight sits on the seat behind her. I don't recommend carrying a tent or sleeping bag on her shoulders, though, or she will end up hitch hiking home in a bad mood.

    [​IMG]
    #7
  8. Gham

    Gham Long timer

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    Good luck,I just looked at the Trophy and from "appearance" it has quite a bit of storage. :lol3

    I'm a smaller guy (5'8") with a 30" inseam so I don't like to get weight stacked too high on cases.It becomes a handful in stop and go or parking lots.A decent pair of riding pants can be worn daily over almost anything and allows my wife to pack shorts or capri pants which are small.

    When we stop to dine we usually just carry our helmets inside as this says to the world..."Hey,my hair doesn't ever look like this unless I'm riding".I could care less but she is quite conscious of it. I try to make 100% sure whatever I'm wearing is dirtier and more wrinkled than what she's wearing. Their just staring at me honey,I'm a mess.
    #8
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  9. RolyKBiker

    RolyKBiker Been here awhile

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    Your bike has plenty of storage you just have to pack what you need rather than what you might need or want.
    Me and Mrs RKB have done extended trips camping and in hotels. Trawl the web for packable, quick-dry, low odour outdoorsy stuff and take sample size shower gel, shampoo and cosmetics.
    Strictly one pair of non riding footwear.
    Hope your wife comes around, many couples solve this problem.
    #9
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  10. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I keep this in my pannier.

    [​IMG]


    That is a good point. My wife found travel underwear from a company called Travel Smith that can be washed in a motel sink (bring a travel size laundry soap), and they will be dry enough to wear in an hour or so.

    https://www.travelsmith.com/category/womens/intimates.do

    She also has synthetic pants that roll up small, and can zip off to shorts, which also dry overnight. Those were from Big-5 Sporting Goods, I believe.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.big5sportinggoods.com/store/details/Pacific Trail+Mens-Nylon-Faille-Convertible-Pants/4533132218127/_/A-5284187#.WOuwXfnyvcs

    Something like this works great for a travel shoe; beach, around town, hiking, etc. Get some air to your feet after all day in a boot.

    [​IMG]

    My wife likes Crocks because she can wash those too. Believe it or not, they are making dress type shoes now.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  11. Eyes Shut

    Eyes Shut See no evil

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    Herb, I have to disagree with you on this. As a passenger, the idea of having a filled backpack behind me seems that it would be very, very uncomfortable. It would push the passenger more forward, making the passenger position less stable. There's not a lot of room between passenger and pilot anyway, and this makes it even less so.

    I suppose if there is not a back rest or top case, then a backpack could be feasible--maybe----but a back rest or top case makes long-distance riding for a passenger ever so much more comfortable and secure.

    But, maybe there's a passenger out there who has tried this on a motorcycle and can comment on it? :dunno
    #11
  12. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Exactly. That is the best way to learn how to pack lighter. :lol3

    I actually used a backpack quite a bit when I camped off my Ninja 636 with no luggage. A short backpack with heavy stuff is bad, but a light one is OK. A long backpack that rests on the seat is OK even with some weight. For one trip, I actually packed my tent and everything in a long backpack, and it stuck up above my head. That was a very miserable trip, and I vowed never to do that again.

    But yeah, I agree. Now that I have luggage I hope to never use a backpack on a motorcycle again.
    #12
  13. Boricua

    Boricua Been here awhile

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    #13
  14. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    Sounds like this is a first time shared adventure (very cool!!) so maybe a 2-3 day trial run close to home and discuss the results and then maybe another 1-2 times to workout the bugs? I originally packed like a two wheeled Beverly Hillbilly truck with all the camping gear and multiple sets of clothing for all possible situations from weather to social activities, etc., and I didn't need a fraction of the stuff taken and had none of a few things that I found would have been really handy if they were on board. The old adage of lay out out what you "need" to take and then cut it in half and maybe half again is a good place to start. The Triumph has huge panniers and with a large dry bag on back and tank bag there is a bunch of room, seriously. The compression type bags mentioned above do a great job and most motels and KOA type campgrounds are very clean and have washers and dryers easily accessed. Not to be rude, but no one will see you on day one more than once let alone any other day so it's not like you wore the same outfit to work 3-4 times in a week. I mix up my camping and hotel stays depending on location, weather and areas I may want to spend more or less time in and nowadays my wife's definition of camping is staying in a "Motel 6" :rofl so those choices greatly impact gear selection. I stayed next to a couple that towed a popup/fold out camper and the couple loved it, really a cool rig and the only negative was a big hit on gas mileage. The husband said for his wife to still ride with him it was worth selling his new Triumph (Bonnie) and getting a more suitable touring bike to make her happy. I stayed in a hotel one night on my first Beverly Hillbilly trip and a couple on a touring bike was in the next room. They packed and were ready to go in five minutes while I was loading prior to them getting ready to ride and a few minutes more after they left. They said they always hotel it and have two sets of riding clothes and a pair of "normal people" outfits if they want to go to dinner, etc. They do a quick load of laundry every other day and the ease and convenience of light loads makes for a better experience from when they spent more time carrying even the kitchen sink. The moral to this story is, it takes time to work your own system out, but the happiest couples be it maximum or minimum approaches had a shared expectation and the rest took care of itself by trial and error.

    Have fun and be safe! You guys can always buy an outfit along the way if needed and ship unused stuff home.

    Cheers
    #14
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  15. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    we travel 2-up all the time, with camping, AND cooking gear, and usually some flyfishing stuff. We take 2 changes of clothes, all lightweight backpacking type stuff, wash in sink, creek, wherever, hang up and dry by morning. camping stuff is the usual 3 man tent, two pads, two sleeping bags(down, pack small) sometimes a kelty tarp. Cooking stuff is an MSR whisperlight, MSR pots/pan, and a small box with kitchen stuff, utensils, salt, pepper, etc. Also carry a collapsible cooler for food and beer at camp. trip west 2014 684.JPG
    BTW, we currently ride a 2012 650 strom, which does quite well. 2 years ago we did a 9000 mile western trip, I never once wished for more power or a different bike.
    we've been doing this a long time now, and pretty much have it dialed with packing and such, but we constantly update our equipment as lighter and more compact stuff becomes available. The bike isn't pretty all loaded up
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  16. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I 2up camp on an FJR with all gear stowed in the 3 cases. Nothing strapped on, nothing exposed. And the shape of the FJR's bags are not very pack friiendly.

    This inclused clothing, fishing gear x 2, axe, tent, 2 bags, 2 pads, 2 chairs. Her stuff on one side, mine the other.


    #16
  17. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    We have a Krauser pannier each. First off, that holds your mattress and sleeping bag. Then you are free to fill it with what ever crap you feel like. Wash kit, a change of clothes - underwear, 1 on, 1 ready, 1 drying, SOP as per manual. There are laundries and dry cleaners, even shops for new stuff.
    Camping gear for up to 6 weeks, ie a tent, gets strapped on the back. Stove and other heating requisites fill the top layer of the tank bag. But as food is my pash, we get to decent restaurants or picnic when excellent local fresh food presents itself.

    The big-time additional bonus of taking little, setting and striking camp can be done very quickly. We can be on the road 10 minutes after rising.
    I toured - once - with a couple who would take an hour to pack, to much bickering and whining the while. The heat and acrimony lasted most of the day. Needless, we split after a few days - "irreconcilable differences".

    Linen clothing is supposed to be wrinkled - this probably has a trendy fashionista name - but we have been doing creased for years. Others strive for our cool insouciance.
    My partner has a roll up linen dress for eating out, and skirts + a top or two for day time walking.
    I guess if like some women of my acquaintance, there is felt a need to change several times a day, and only completely new laundered clothes will do, I am thinking extended bike camping is maybe not for you.

    Helmet hair is a thing - short hair suffers less. I have a #1 before we leave. I always look my best (not necessarily good). Any sort of "styling" will look shit, even after a quick helmet on-off.
    Motorcycle riding is not much about looking good when you get there, it is about having the best time getting there.
    The rider should have it as one of their prime objectives that any passenger have a great time too, share in the positives of the intimacies with the outside and freedoms that come with bike riding. Taking the helmet off at the end of a ride should elicit a "wow! that was great, did you see those mountains\animals\castles", not "look what it did to my hair".
    If the passenger only sees a bike as an inferior and uncomfortable way of getting from A to B then the game is lost.
    If you are newly trying this as a couple, you should be doing more short trips to build the confidence and enjoyment. Long trips can be a full of pain and hardship, needing fortitude and the knowledge that it will be better soon\tomorrow is helpful to realise that this is not going to last and is not done on purpose to ruin your partners life. Rather than "Take me to the fucking airport. Now!".

    May not work for everyone of course, but has for me for 30+ years.
    #17
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  18. Hill Climber

    Hill Climber Been here awhile

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    I lay the bagged tools, tubes, and small compressor on the bottom of each SW-Motech TraX pannier to distribute the weight, then she gets one, I get the other. I bring her pannier in the house 2 weeks before we leave, so she can practice packing what she needs, not wants. (Hmmm, size does matter!!!) We share the top box, but leave room enough to stash gloves, sweaters, rain gear and such, stuff that's easily accessible. The tank bag is mostly mine... bike reg, wallets, cell phone, maps, bottle of water, chain lube, men's lipstick (chap stick) etc.

    We tried lashing a couple of duffle bags to the top of the panniers, but the wind buffeting they cause is too severe for my wife. After 3 days of riding, she could hardly move her head as her neck was too sore. If we travelled at a modest 50 mph, things would be fine, but I have a habit of twisting a little hard, and keep it at 75 or so... that's when the buffeting gets severe. Now we stay in motels instead of camping.
    #18
  19. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I don't like that much stuff hanging off the bike. I have always worried something would come loose and get into the back wheel, causing a crash. Here is my bike loaded for solo camping.

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, I would have to leave the duffel containing my tent/sleeping bag if I were to take a passenger. Another option, if your top rack is strong enough, is to leave the top box and attach the duffel to the rack. That would give room for passenger. You would need very compact sleeping bags to fit all of it in one duffel, though. Maybe some of those high tech hiker sleeping bags. Don't skimp on temperature rating, though, or you will have an upset wife on your hands. I did that once, and froze my butt, but had nobody to blame but myself.

    If you mount the duffel to the rear rack, and she is using it as a back rest, a small backpack will sit right on top of it. This way, there is no weight on her shoulders.
    #19
  20. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Good stuff!

    My wife has very long hair, and it used to get tangled in the wind. She found these these hair things that keep it neat and contained. They are generally black leather, and marketed toward the Harley crowd, but they work like a charm. She keeps her pony tail down low so it doesn't interfere with her helmet.

    [​IMG]
    #20