How much more are motorcycles worth in the spring?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by nick2ny, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. nick2ny

    nick2ny Been here awhile

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    I have a 900SS and a Yamaha R1 that I'm looking to sell in NYC. We have winter here--my question is, how much more money will I get for them if I wait until the spring to sell them? 10%? More?
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  2. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Think of a price you want to get, factor in a couple hundred for haggling, and put it up for sale. The seasons don't matter as much as people think. Many buyers think they'd get a better deal in the fall and are often more aggressive. More bikes on the market in the spring may reduce bargaining power.

    I sold an 08 CBF1000 a few days ago, had it up for sale less than 2 days. Was asking 69, got 67. The guy had insurance on it and I had the money in hand in my driveway and he hadn't seen the bike yet.

    GLWS.....
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  3. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    Put them up for sale now at a reasonable price. Why wait if you want them gone?
    And don't put in the ad, "I really don't want to sell the bike but...". What a bunch of BS.
    I was talking to a guy last night about buying his bike and he came out with that line. I said "Fine, keep it, good bye".
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  4. nick2ny

    nick2ny Been here awhile

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    Yeah, you're right.
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  5. Balootraveler

    Balootraveler Been here awhile

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    Around here most buyers are thinking sleds and winter toys so bike seem to slow down except special buyer, the guy looking for bike x. In the spring things flip flop. Ask a price and when you get an offer decide if the money in the bank or bike in the garage is worth more. My two cents worth.
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  6. Motor7

    Motor7 Been here awhile

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  7. Handy

    Handy Sunburnt

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    In my experience it is just harder to sell things in the winter, it might be different in your area though. I had a bike for sale for most of last winter and didn't really start to see any interest until about April if I remember right.
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  8. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I think the "fall penalty" depends on the bike. For mainstream bikes, utility bikes, commuter bikes, smaller bikes, and bikes that tend to be bought by novice riders, it's huge. For a collector bike, performance bike, or anything specialized and highly desirable, it isn't much. I think of it this way.... if the bike is likely to be bought by an older guy showing up with a truck/trailer to haul it away, just sell now. But if it's one likely to be bought by a 22-yo kid who has his girlfriend drop him off to ride it home, wait until spring.

    I'd think a 900SS or R1 might sell to an enthusiast who has been watching for the bike for some time. If you're CL'ing it, why not give it a shot? This will also provide the impetus to get the bike nice and clean before winter storage which is also good for it.

    All this being said, if it is an older bike which has already suffered the lion's share of depreciation and you have the ability to store it over the winter, the extra you'll get in the spring will almost always be worth it. But my experience is also that you need to be an early bird and get the bike on the market early in the season when there is a lot of demand and low supply. I like to sell bikes in March. Waiting until June isn't a good idea. And August can suck for selling bikes - huge supply, few buyers, and people short of money as the tax refunds are long gone and they're scrapping money together for tuition.

    - Mark
    #8