how the heck do you get a tire off ??

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by xcaret, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    As to cutting them off when real old-I use a grinder. Get rim protectors-some are better designed than others. MotionPro are good but don't always slip on every rim thats thicker at edge. I use large paint stir sticks/thin wood scraps in shop to hold the tire when moving my levers around
    FWIW, go to the post by "Poolside" on how to change a tire. I found it interesting. Also look at Stubby brand tire tools -I plan to buy them.
    In the UK having a town real close(part of the problem & the solution,huh?) is the reality-not so true elsewhere!
    #21
  2. 190e

    190e Long timer

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    Not everyone in the UK uses a tire depot. I've always changed my own. It wasn't even remotely difficult until alloy wheel came along.
    #22
  3. Paul_Rochdale

    Paul_Rochdale Been here awhile

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    OK, 99.999% of riders use a TYRE depot and I suspect from your spelling you're from the Sargasso Sea.:D
    #23
  4. hensmen

    hensmen Been here awhile

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    As a much more addicted money safer than a scottsman, i am a swabian from the south off Germany, the first time i heared off the mainstand theory, by the BMW r100 GS, cause off their high flanks.
    Beside, i have about three bikes in use, one hack for winterdriving. Till now i changed all tyres by myselve. The use off the hard tyreprofil is against the finetuning. The two irons and the three plastic covers are always in the luggage. It is not only to safe money, but i buy the tyres in the internet and the dealers are not pleased to change tyres from other dealers.
    The ladder was my last choice, by a used wheel buy, and the liquid soap helped to safe the day.
    Hans
    #24
  5. JonnyCash

    JonnyCash turd polisher

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    ^that's the very point that drove me to change my own tires a few years ago. BT45's at my local shop were going to cost over $300, on the internet I got them for right about $200. I wouldn't insult a shop owner by bringing him a tire that I bought elsewhere. The local guy said that when you buy a tire mail order, it may be years old and deteriorated, but whenever I've bought them they seemed fresh as a daisy. Has anyone here had any trouble with internet tires?
    #25
  6. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    Some nice bead breaking contraptions. I wish I had a photo of mine. It's a small car's scissor jack, about 15 inches of 4x4 wood and another chunk of wood. That and a door jam is what I use to break beads. I have broken a lot of beads thusly. I suggest not to use your rim as a tire tool fulcrum point to break a bead. That sounds like a gouged rim waiting to happen. Breaking the bead on the road? Personally, I run tubeless. I fix flats with vulcanizing plugs and go. Tube type? The center stand has worked for me. Taking the tire off and on? My motto is 'work the well'. That is what it is there for!
    #26
  7. 81twins

    81twins Adventurer

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    Best Rest Products out of Seattle has a great bead breaker that also comes apart, fits in a small roll and travels well.
    #27
  8. rambozo

    rambozo Been here awhile

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    I have a Sealey bead breaker that's pretty much identical to the harbour freight
    one in the photo at the start of the thread, I think shite is a very apt description of it,
    it's not sturdy enough for a tough bead and it's easy to damage a rim with it

    Never heard of the side stand method, who ever came up with that needs a pat on the
    back
    #28
  9. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    Oops! I meant CENTER stand.
    #29
  10. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    That's what you said originally.:wink:
    Did you mean side stand?

    I tried the centre stand once on my rear wheel. Not a good idea.
    #30
  11. pommie john

    pommie john Long timer

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    On the other hand the internet suppliers, being cheap, may turn over more stock and have fresher tyres. They should have a date stamp on them, but I think each manufacturer has their own codes that you need to decipher.
    #31
  12. pommie john

    pommie john Long timer

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    In my humble opinion tyre changing is a useful skill to learn but given the choice I'd get a professional to do it, 'cos I'm getting old and lazy.

    In the 80s I used to use Continental tyres. partly because they had very flexible sidewalls and that made they very easy to fit.
    #32
  13. Paul_Rochdale

    Paul_Rochdale Been here awhile

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    That's not been my experience. OK, with motorcycle tyres I go to my local tyre depot and he either has them in stock or can get them within 24hrs. I'm currently building a kitcar and bought some scarce Michelin tyres on eBay. I took them to the tyre depot and he fitted them to my rims for a small fee. Nobody was insulted. It's their job after all and they can always say "No". The code on the sidewall tells us the month and year of manufacture so there's no guesswork.
    #33
  14. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    Been using internet ordered tires for a long time now, never an issue, unless I'm stupid and order the wrong size! helps a bunch if the tires are nice and warm, both the one coming off and the one going on. I like to go for a short ride to put some heat in the one coming off, and either lay the new one in the sun if it's nice out, or inside for a couple days if it's nasty out.
    and the best thing I ever did was buy a BEAD BREAKER, money well spent!!!!!!!
    #34
  15. brittrunyon

    brittrunyon R 100 GS F 650 GS

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    What bead breaker do you have? :ear
    #35
  16. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I have a cheapo tire changer, the bead breaker is built into the base of it. Don't know what brand it is, probably from harbor freight or some such place, but it works for everything I need it to do.
    #36
  17. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    I think you usually get fresher tires mail order. The date code is the same on all tires. 3 digit. Two digits are the week of the year it was made and one digit is the year.
    #37
  18. sigpe57

    sigpe57 Been here awhile

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    This is not funny. It's reality. I ended up cutting every old airhead tire instead of dismount them using manual tire changer. What you see on the Utube how easy it is using the manual tire changer to mount/dismount the tire is only true to certain degree. It might be easy to mount/dismount fresh and wide tubeless tire.

    On old and narrow airhead tire, if it's dry like to picture above, you need to cut it off or send the tire to the MC shop to have it removed with a machine. If you try to remove the tire manually ,you will most likely damage or bend the rim. Last time I bought a stubborn old tire to the shop it took 2 guys with a tire machine to have the tire removed.

    I finally know the limitation of a manual tire changer. Very tempting to buy an automatic one.
    #38
  19. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I always have a couple beers before doing tires, amazing what beer muscles can do!:1drink
    #39
  20. homere

    homere Been here awhile

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    Big C clamp, lube it , ?
    #40