How to get a bike upright after a fall

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Akhenaten, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. redneckdan

    redneckdan Hold my beer & watch this

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    Nice and simple, I like it. Not sure how much force is being lost though. It's a 2:1 system and flat webbing sliding across a non rolling surface has to require a fair bit of effort.

    Dan
    #41
  2. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    If you want to reduce that friction loss then
    rotate the D shackles in the photo 180 degrees - so the webbing slides on the flat bolt surface rather than the curve.
    Get some metal tubing that goes over the shackle bolt ... now what ever have the less friction will rotate. (Problem - the webbing will tend to go to one side ...)

    -----------------------
    The use of this pulley system assumes that you have something to anchor too. If you don't have one of those you are back to a dead lift.
    #42
  3. sandgroper

    sandgroper Long timer

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    about 5 years ago i did my back picking up my GS1100, the pain was so bad i ended up going to a hospital. woke up five days later my back was great, but in the mine time i had a stroke (the doctor was a quack) I couldn't remember my name.:eek1 so be very careful when you pick up your bike, don't be in a hurry like i was.
    Ed
    #43
  4. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    try it.

    Easy enough to add another shackle if you need more purchase. I carry a 25' length and a 10' length.
    #44
  5. Coachgeo

    Coachgeo Diesel Adventurer

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    #45
  6. Coachgeo

    Coachgeo Diesel Adventurer

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    so your talking something similar to furniture moving straps (forearm fork lifts) but over the shoulder or similar?

    [​IMG]
    looks like the over the shoulder kind you could even add a ratchet using yourself as the anchor but then how do you then grab the bike with out disturbing the height you raised it? hmmm........ Guess you could step in closer every couple of ratchets till your next to the bike and can finish the lift hmmmmmmmmm
    [​IMG]
    #46
  7. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    I don't find much difference between the polished stainless shackle and bolt in terms of friction, using the climbing strap.

    If you are using cordage (up to 3/16"/4mm), Ronstan has introduced a new "Sheaveless Block" called the SHOCK that is extremely compact and light. Safe working load up to 385 lbs. Very clever, though I prefer the nylon climbing webbing, which has a 2,000 lb working load.


    [​IMG]

    Around here there's usually a tree or rock to anchor to: YMMV.
    #47
  8. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Yes, mine has D-rings like a helmet strap so I slip it through a frame rail or the crash bars, through the D-rings and cinch it up, then just lift with my legs.

    I'm not particularly strong, but what I found was an absolute bastard was that I had to shift my grip to get the bike all the way up - just couldn't do that without dropping it again. With the strap, it comes up most of the way, all the lifting done with my legs. My arms are relatively free so I can grab the bike at that point and finish the lift. Those furnature straps look at least as good.

    Pete
    #48
  9. billy1000cc

    billy1000cc n00b

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    I had a summer job as a Harley rep and drunks were often knocking over bikes. I used the "apply front break and squat" technique displayed in the video many times without hurting myself the bikes or the drunks.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84YfDGKA4Og
    #49