How to Remove Heat Stains on Engine?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by DetourJournal, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. everycredit

    everycredit Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    272
    Location:
    Tacoma
    I don't think any detergent is going to work. Aircraft stripper may work (this is to repaint/refinish cylinder head covers). A wire brush may pit magnesium/magnesium alloy. I''m not too experienced working with magnesium, so I don't know how soft it is and what you can get away with.

    Paint with high-temp primer and paint.
    #21
  2. FixxiT

    FixxiT Lunitic Fringe

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Oddometer:
    970
    Location:
    TaxToll Island, NY Elevation: 22 feet
    ^ ^ this ^ ^

    If the heat melted the sight glass & toasted the paint on the head covers..I would definitly be concerned about the condition of the internal plastic parts...cam chain guides, timing chain guides, oil inlet assy...
    #22
  3. DetourJournal

    DetourJournal DetourJournal.com

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    84
    Location:
    Provo, Utah
    It sounds like I'm definitely going to have to go deeper than simply removing the valve covers to check those things. Or is that as far as I'll probably need to go?
    #23
  4. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

    Joined:
    May 18, 2002
    Oddometer:
    22,868
    Location:
    The Submarine Mines
    You'll see the cam chain tensioner and guide rails when the valve covers come off. The ends are unsupported, if they're fine, chances are very good the rest of their length is. The timing chain tensioner and guide are in the front of the motor, which you'll want to partially disassemble to inspect the HES wiring anyway. I'd also look at the belt, it may have seen damaged as well.
    #24
  5. kellymac530

    kellymac530 motorcycle addict

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,052
    Location:
    so. cal.
    It looks as though you are correct, I could not find ammonia in its ingediendts. But it sure has that high ammonia smell and pain in my lungs if I breath it in.

    It is labeled as a level 3 health hazard and a high inhalation risk...ammonia or not. It is also listed as Citrus scented as it shows on page 3/7 of the MSDS sheet...it is listed as a hazardous material as per OSHA regs and is a HAZMAT chemical


    http://www.supercleanbrands.com/sites/default/files/SuperClean Degreaser English MSDS 03-10-11.pdf

    Sorry for mis-speaking. My intent was to warn the user to be careful. I may be thinking of my Super Purple cleaner I have that is citrus and ammonia....one of them. But they all tear up my lungs if I get a whiff.
    #25
  6. WindSailor

    WindSailor Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    795
    Location:
    Somewhere out West
    Yep.

    We work with different solutions of sodium hydroxide - and it is plumb ass dangerous.

    We had a pump that blew a gasket and sprayed a women who was standing near by - they rushed her to a safety shower probably within 45 seconds and during that time she lost 80% of her hair on the top of her head. Not nice stuff.

    That slimy feeling when you rub your fingers together with caustic on it - is your skin melting off. It's not like an acid, with caustic you have to continue to rinse with water for 15 min.

    Anyway...
    #26
  7. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,976
    Location:
    the west
    Its the loss of temper to the input splines that you may want to look after. In spite of all the postulations on sudden input spline failure it is actually caused by the owner over-heating on the side stand. Splash lubrication of oil originating in the clutch slave cavity can't make it to the splines while on the side stand.
    #27
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    65,434
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Seriously? You think a motor hitting maybe 250-275° will remove the temper from the input splines? :norton

    You would have to melt the case to do that!:deal

    Jim :brow
    #28
  9. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    13,737
    Location:
    The woods and mountains of Alabama
    Super Clean is not a detergent.

    Aircraft paint strippers are hazardous and require a respirator as do the aircraft paints. Unless you are experienced and have the equipment, stay away from them.

    If you want to restore the factory look and durability, have the OHV covers powder coated.
    #29
  10. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    13,737
    Location:
    The woods and mountains of Alabama
    Yes, if the splines were made of silly-putty.

    :huh
    #30
  11. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,124
    Location:
    sydney, east
    This is an old chestnut i will argue against till the kangaroos come home. Cold oil / cold metal must be warmed to a sensible temp before loaded or you are courting increased wear, the modern boxer engine is not magically exempt from this. Seriously all that is required is simple plain common sense, if a rider is going to abandon a running motor without thinking to switch it off is said rider really in the right frame of mind to be operating said machinery in the first place ? (not being disrespectful , a genuine rhetorical question).:eek1:lurk
    #31
  12. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    13,737
    Location:
    The woods and mountains of Alabama
    I never leave a vehicle running unless I am on it or in it.

    I turn lights off when I leave a room.

    I turn the heat down at night.

    I turn things off if I am not using them, riding them, driving them or otherwise operating them.

    Had a fellow trip and fall on his chainsaw that was on the ground idling. He was not killed but he did loose a finger.
    #32
  13. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    13,737
    Location:
    The woods and mountains of Alabama
    BMW and most riders disagree. Do not warm the boxer engine. Start the engine, disengage the clutch, engage 1st gear and ride off loading the engine lightly until the engine is at operating temperature.

    Remember, some of us have CATs in our exhaust and during cold start, the mixture is enriched causing some extra heat in the CAT. Also, engine blowby is reduced when the engine is lightly loaded during cold run. Also, lightly loading the engine will warm it much faster getting into the right tolerances and heat range sooner so lubrication is optimized. Warming the engine only increases the cold run time, may create more crankcase condensation and therefore wear out your engine oils ability to neutralize acids (TBN).

    If you are concerned about cold start engine wear, use a synthetic engine oil with superior pumpability and better film strength.

    Hmmmmmmm....is that kangaroo I see in your front yard?

    Aircraft engines are different...they are warmed for reasons of safety and maximum power at takeoff.

    The GS is a lousy airplane....no propeller!
    #33
  14. WindSailor

    WindSailor Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    795
    Location:
    Somewhere out West
    I think everyone knows it is better on an engine if you warm it up first.

    Starting an air cooled engine and then riding it has been an old train of thought that I can remember dating backwards of the middle sixty's in my count. More than one air cooled engine has seized because someone got distracted after first starting up the bike; and I'm sure many more will happen after today. It just happens, people get distracted.

    So... next we talk about preventative steps to keep this from happening again. Besides creating and following through with those repetitive steps -repeatedly- on creating a good habit, right?

    What about adding an oil cooler fan - either with a thermostat controller or simply running through a switch. That way when you start the bike you could start the fan - and hope for the best in case you get distracted. Testing required.

    Most of the time I back the bike out, lay out all of my gear, and start the bike. Put gear on, load the bike up, gps on and running - then - get on the bike and ride slowly for better than two miles (2nd gear show).

    I don't think the new water boxer should have a problem in this topic... or at least it *shouldn't* have a problem. Interesting thought though if it has enough cooling power to just sit and run idle for 15 minutes. Hmmmm.
    #34
  15. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    5,964
    Location:
    Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
    Jim, I think he "got" you :lol3. I nearly took the bait too, until I read the bit about splash lube of the clutch release bearing on the side-stand.
    #35
  16. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    5,964
    Location:
    Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
    Better idea... If the phone rings, or you remember you left the fridge light on, or you need to pee, or whatever - Just turn the bloody bike off before you run back in the house.

    Let me put it another way - Make this your mantra: "Never, ever, leave a running motorcycle unattended."
    #36
  17. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,976
    Location:
    the west
    Hi Jim, Hi Def, Something like that. It appears that some 1150's did not receive normal hardening. That aside I do not think that the factory anticipated pp leaving their mc idling on the stands when they enabled idling on the 1150. I mentioned this before but I have to switch off 1150's left to burn up by riders parked in front of the dealer all the time. When the riders finally come out 20 minute later they had no idea that the mc was not to be left idling. The mc's were in full view of dealership personnel to boot.

    When you see the threads where pp try to place a value on this or that 1150 with x miles then that is where I jump in and say miles on an 1150 don't mean squat. It's all about condition and nothing more. Signs of overheating are the first things you need to look for on any 1150. Nevertheless pp still place too much value on miles rather than condition. If I were op then I might salvage out my abused overheated 1150 and start over. Never can tell how much is compromised till you are broke down. It isn't like you can buy repair parts for a reasonable price.
    #37
  18. toy4fun

    toy4fun GET out of the way

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    Beautiful downtown Roy, WA
    You guys are killing a dead horse the guy messed up, needs to know how to fix it. let's wait unitl he screws it up again before we get a couple of hundred pages on the subject and thank u, thank u, thank u......i have the 1150rt and I won't do that!
    #38
  19. DetourJournal

    DetourJournal DetourJournal.com

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    84
    Location:
    Provo, Utah
    So back to the the original topic of Removing heat stains...
    I tried a couple different products to see what worked best. It's hard to tell from the lighting in the image below but the Carb cleaner and the Super Clean did the job about the same, Both equally and almost entirely brought the color back. Ultimately Super Clean wins because it required less scrubbing. I plan to pull out the buffer pad and do the whole thing later tonight.

    [​IMG]

    Also, I indeed got super lucky. Chain Tensioners, guide rails and the Hall sensor are all fine. Regardless it still ended up costing me $250 in parts to fix everything (New oil window, Valve gaskets, Oil & Filters, Oil fill cap, etc...).

    The Burnt color isn't entirely gone so I'll still try out some other suggestions.
    #39
  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    65,434
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    If you didn't burn up any of your sensors I would suggest that the bike didn't get to critical in overheating. It is common in these situations that the sensors get destroyed when the overheat hit a critical level. At that point it is hit or miss whether or not the motor would survive long term.

    Jim :brow
    #40