how to remove the flywheel with out any special tools

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by ktmr32, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. ktmr32

    ktmr32 Adventurer

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    hi folks i am going soon to remove my flywheel and i was wondering if i could remove it with out any ktm tools?
    Any suggestions?

    thanks in advance:norton
    #1
  2. Aquanout

    Aquanout Hooliganantic

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    Ignition rotor?
    #2
  3. xdbx

    xdbx Motorcycle Connoisseur

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    you'll need a way to block the motor from spinning to rotate the bolt. Impact drivers work well for this, or you can use a penny into some meshing gears as well. In a pinch, you can also put rope into spark plug hole and turn the motor over into it. Wouldn't get creative unless you need to.

    After you get the bolt off, you'll need to pull that rotor off, as its pressed on. You can use any press tool to do this. The easiest is often a steering wheel puller, or adjustable 3 jaw puller, purchased from an autoparts/hardware store, or rented from a local "O'reilly's or auto zone".

    :thumb
    #3
  4. Seth S

    Seth S Will _____ for _____

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    find 2 trees approximately 2 feet apart. remove the flywheel cover and park the bike one one side. attach a chain to the flywheel and attach the other end to a good truck. give yourself some slack so you can get some speed up before the chain goes taught. the rest is pretty intuitive.


    or


    put the bike in gear, hold the rear brake, and loosen the flywheel nut. Its been a while since I've been into a 950 flywheel but I think you have to pull the stator. you might be able to use 2 pprybars or large flat screw drivers...one on each side and carefully pry the flywheel off...carefully being the key word. never done this one a 950 so its all about watching and taking it slow. if it looks like you will damage the case or scratch something than i would advise looking into a puller
    #4
  5. BLUE(UK)

    BLUE(UK) Long timer

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    I was told it is OK to just lock up the crank with the crank locking bolt at TDC and undo it although this was AFTER i'd used my own method of using a 50pence coin in the teeth.
    Getting it off....I took mine in to my local dealer who used the proper puller to remove it since I always buy my parts from there they do a few bits for me for free. No way would I have managed to get it off without the proper puller.
    #5
  6. ktmr32

    ktmr32 Adventurer

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    thanks guys
    #6
  7. garmei

    garmei Adventurer

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    A mate of mine made me a copy of the KTM puller (large bolt and grub screw). That didn't work (the grub screw just kep being pushed into the balancer shaft), so i tapped a hole into the bolt and converted it into a slide hammer with some stud bar and a heavy tube and some washers. Heat, anti seize and half an hour of furious bashing didn't move it one bit. I just replaced the rear cam chain and left the front for another day. That sucker is really stuck on there.
    #7
  8. BLUE(UK)

    BLUE(UK) Long timer

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    Sounds like the only solution is to pay a shop if the engine is out or buy the tool and once you've used it,either rent it out or sell it on for $10 less each time until it becomes cheap enough for someone to just keep it.
    #8
  9. kamanya

    kamanya Andrew to most

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    If you bike is pre-2005, just go to your local bolt shop and ask for the following;

    A grub screw, 16mm diameter with a 2mm thread pitch. The large bolt is 20mm diameter with a 1.5mm thread pitch.

    CAUTION
    IF it is post 2005, then the grub screw is a finer thread - I don't know it at the mo, but someone will be along soon I am sure.



    [​IMG]


    The grub'ed threaded one or "pressure screw" that KTM refer to (600.29.009.010 up to 2004 and 600.29.009.110 for 2005 and later) threads into the crank. By itself it can't pull anything. It just screws into the crank.

    Then you have to thread the second puller (or in this case the pusher) into the generator; 600.29.009.000. If you look you can see a fine thread in the generator.

    Lock the engine with the locking bolt, then;

    The idea is that the grubbed pressure screw sits just proud of the end of the crank and takes up the pressure that the second puller will exert when you start putting torque into it. This second one threads into the generator and as you torque it, it comes up against the pressure screw. The crank is going nowhere so it ends up pushing the generator off.

    It doesn't take much force to get it off using these tools, but then a thread multiplies the input torque hugely. I wouldn't want to try lever it off, I think it would take a lot of persuading.
    #9
  10. Aquanout

    Aquanout Hooliganantic

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    Yep, what Kamanya wrote. Pullers and heat are not good to use on the ignition rotor.
    #10
  11. Lil' Irv

    Lil' Irv Adventurer

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    Just had to do this after my stator and flywheel were trashed by broken rotor bolts. In the grand scheme of things the added cost for the puller wasn't that much more so I just ordered both bolts along with the other parts. Wouldn't you know that everything came except for the smaller bolt that goes in the crankshaft. KTM says they're backordered and they don't know when they'll come from the Fatherland. So I picked up 10 grub screws (smallest number I could buy) from Grainger for about 5 bucks to give it a try.

    Unfortunately the pitch is steeper on the small bolt than the large bolt so every time it started to snug up the small bolt walked away. Tried this several times with the same result. The large bolt does make contact with the crank end but I was scared to reef on that and make matters worse.

    I was considering cutting one of the grub screws in half so I could bottom one out and follow it with the cut one as a solution. Before I got that far I decided to try a little heat on it so I heated the hub of the flywheel with a MAP gas torch for not even 10 seconds. Quickly threaded the large bolt in finger tight and put the wrench to it thinking just a little pressure, don't get carried away and f* things up! I didn't even turn it an 1/8 of a turn and the flywheel just came off, no pop, no fanfare, just came right off. The crank end was just barely warm to the touch.

    So heat can help if used quickly and judiciously.
    #11
  12. BillyD

    BillyD Been here awhile

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    Years ago, my auto shop teacher said, "if you need a tool and don't buy it, you pay for it anyway."

    No truer words have ever been spoken.
    #12
  13. walstibsf

    walstibsf ADVENTURE-HOLIC

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    The trees are just for shade, right?
    #13
  14. Datan556

    Datan556 2stroke a day keeps the doctor away

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    damn that takes me back!
    #14
  15. RedRupert

    RedRupert Brit in the Soviet Union

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    That is how I've been doing it. It's easy that way.

    The two parts cost an unbelievable €40 from KTM.

    You could cut down your flywheel bolt to use as a grub-screw, but check the price and availability of a replacement before you do.

    Early bikes had an M16 x 2 mm grub screw (and flywheel retaining bolt). Later bikes had an M16 x 1.5 mm grub screw.

    Check to see which one you've got, by measuring the tread pitch of your flywheel bolt, this is the 1.5 mm version from a 990:

    [​IMG]
    #15
  16. Katoom72

    Katoom72 Been here awhile

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    Rebuild my water pump without any tool that was required according to the manual. :)
    #16
  17. Blackalac

    Blackalac Adventurer

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    #17
  18. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Theres so much bad advice on here it must be ADV. Penny in the gears is really dumb,using prybars is really dumb,torch is beyond dumb unless Im taking apart a 40 year old scrappy bike,even then smoking a stator is a real possibility.

    KTM parts are super pricey,use the right tools.
    If you have 0 idea what your doing pay to have it done,can be way cheaper in the short and long run.

    Ive got a Harbor Freight 40.00 electric impact that will loosen most any nut.
    Rent or buy the right puller,looking at a shop manual can solve many mysteries.
    #18
  19. BillyD

    BillyD Been here awhile

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    Then that manual referenced tool wasn't needed in the first place...:wink:

    Of course, maybe you just got lucky or took X times longer to do the job.
    #19
  20. gefr

    gefr Life is a trip

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    .
    #20