how to secure bikes on a ute?

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Bleh, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. Bleh

    Bleh Long timer

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    Ok, so this is probably a question that has been asked and answered many times, but couldn't find anything when I searched.

    So, the girlfriend just got her first dirt bike and transporting them has become an issue now. When it was just my bike, it was easy to just put it on the ute, wedge the front wheel in the corner and tie it down using the side stand for support. Now I need to get 2 bikes in so this isn't really an option.

    Anyway, I have a falcon ute with one of those plastic trays in it, so getting wheel chocks that bolt to the bottom of the tray don't really seem like an option, although I could get a metal plate top and bottom to secure it.

    The Ford answer is this:

    http://www.ford.com.au/servlet/ContentServer?cid=1137384543770&pagename=FOA%2FDFYArticle%2FPopup&c=DFYArticle

    But at nearly $450 is not really ideal.

    The ballards catalogue has something that looks very similar for $165.

    Are there any other options out there that I'm not seeing? Have any of you set up a falcon (or any other ute with a plastic tray liner) to fit 2 bikes? If so, how did you do it?
    #1
  2. jtb

    jtb Long timer

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    For the same money ($450) you get get a box trailer! Mulitple uses AND you can carry at least one, two if you get a bige enough size trailer...:thumb
    #2
  3. outback jack

    outback jack Long timer

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    I just made one up out of angle and some box, 2 lengths of 35mm box across the tray width and then 2 lengths of angle to each wheel track for the length welded to the box section, easy to lift in and out and the bikes sit in there good with tie downs and fork supports. Cost about $100 for materials approx and a couple of hours of your time.
    #3
  4. carmima

    carmima All Orange :-)

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    rope
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  5. rigs_au

    rigs_au Corripe Cervisiam

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    <<<< smartarses need not apply. :rofl
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  6. Dale950

    Dale950 Long timer

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    #6
  7. vudu_52

    vudu_52 Black Magic

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  8. PartTimeTravel

    PartTimeTravel Been here awhile

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    ask a Harley Rider :)
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  9. What's his Face

    What's his Face lost as

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    is this site called advrider of adv-on-the-back-of-a-ute

    just ride the fuckers:D
    #9
  10. Bleh

    Bleh Long timer

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    Don't really want a box trailer. Might be able to get one at a reasonable price, but still have the problem of securing them in the trailer, plus the ongoing cost of keeping it registered.

    I've considered this, and I still haven't ruled it out, but I don't have a welder. I guess I could probably find a friend with a welder, or just bolt it together. Will think about this one.



    This is more for just tying it down. I'm happy with regular tie downs and a fork brace for that, it's what i've been using and works fine. Looking more for something to hold the front wheel in place to stop it moving sideways. Also, don't have tiedown points on low enough to use these.


    This is the kind of thing I'm looking for, but the Falcon model is listed as *coming soon*. Might be worth seeing how soon that is.


    Thanks for the suggestions. Keep them coming if anyone has any other ideas.


    The rest of you that had nothing useful to say, you're all very funny with comments that I'm sure will become timeless classic, like "ask a harley rider" and "adv-on-the-back-of-a-ute" and while I'm sure you spent hours coming up with your amazingly witty remarks, they're not very helpful.
    #10
  11. searchin oz

    searchin oz Sand, Gimme more sand

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    Try putting front wheel's in each corner.

    Now can I charge you the same ridiculous amount you are willing to give some bloke for nothing.........
    #11
  12. DANNOj

    DANNOj Long timer

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    Bleh,
    I carry two big bikes in a standard allum drop side tray. I secure each front wheel with one small strap/rope around the wheel, and onto the head board. It doesn't need to be super strong, its just to locate it.

    I know its different with your tray liner, but I'm thinking that instead of paying $199 a bike just to locate the front wheel, perhaps you can drill through the head of the tray (about 300mm high - axle height) and plate either side, and just have a couple of small hooks. Not "tie-down" strength, but just enough to secure a rope or strap around the wheel.

    I really do think it only needs to be this simple. I have never had a bike shift.

    Cheers, Dan
    #12
  13. whitey222

    whitey222 occasionally adventurous

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    Are they really making ute trays from plastic these days ? Surely, it's a metal tray with a plastic liner (?).

    Like Dannoj, I have a ute with an after-market aluminium tray. If there is steel below a plastic liner in your tray, you should be able to drill holes and install wheel chocks, or do as I did, install a couple of $5 ring bolts either side of the bike near the rear wheel. You can run a tie-down from one eye bolt to the other with the strap passing over the bikes seat, or alternatively, a short strap holding the rear wheel in place. Both methods prevent the bike from rolling forward. There's no real need for wheel chocks or guides, but you could use them instead if it gives you a warm fuzzy feeling .

    If they really ARE making trays out of plastic these days, heaven help us all and everything I just said is useless to you. :)
    #13
  14. Bleh

    Bleh Long timer

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    I was planning on trying that, just haven't had a chance to go riding since she got her bike (only a couple of weeks ago). Wasn't really sure if that would be stable enough, so I am looking at other options.
    #14