How to teach myself dirt!?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by gzr, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. bobnoxious67

    bobnoxious67 Baby steps...

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    It's not that straight forward in the dirt, but my basic advice was towards a noob learning how to make a bike move in the direction you want it to...in the dirt...weaving side to side in a debris strewn/multiple obstacles/multiple line dirt trail...standing up...in like 2nd or 3rd gear at best.

    Weight on the outside peg (or lack of commitment to weight the inside peg...which seems more correct to me) usually results in Climbing out of the "trail" and going wide or "crashing":lol3

    This is a completely different set of human inputs used to sit/stick a leg out/apply weight to rear tire/railing a nice berm dirt corner...and especially different from being on a bike while railing around paved corners and hanging off the inside:deal
    #41
  2. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Try weighting the inside while doing this. :D I know it's RC but I cannot take pictures of me while riding. :evil

    [​IMG]
    #42
  3. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    + 1m
    #43
  4. Vankaye

    Vankaye n00b on the move

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    a smaller more nimble bike would be the best thing to learn all facets of off-road. Not that one CAN'T learn it on a big honkin 650... but damn that's a lot of bike to have landing on you. One thing about beginning off-road riding is THAT YOU WILL have get-offs on a regular basis. As you push yourself harder and harder, it's only natural that we learn from our mistakes...

    As you try more and more challenging terrain you will fall off more!!

    I ride a lot of sand and woods on my 2-stroke RM250. I cannot imagine getting tangled up with such a big bike.

    My advice is, if you really want to learn, get yourself a little 125(2t) or a 250(4t) and ride your ass off. Then take your big 650 off road with confidence.
    #44
  5. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    It's tough to go faster when you're still learning. Really though, what happens when going slow say, around 10-15 mph is your front tire can/will slip and you crash. There isn't enough speed and momentum for your front tire to find some grip again at those slow speeds in that fraction of a second.

    As your speed increases, so does the stability. Part due to gyroscopic forces of the wheel, but mostly because at 20-30 mph when your front slips, it finds traction much quicker due to the greater distance traveled in that same split second.

    Touch wood, I only crash when I go slow.

    As far as standing up is concerned, another benefit is to catch your balance by doing a judo-kick out to the side. It works great in the right situation. It's much better than stopping and or putting a foot down.

    It's the precious momentum that you get to keep if you can keep your balance on slow going stuff. Standing on the pegs allows it.

    I ride my supermoto on well, anything and everything.

    I have to watch my line, and use the methods debated above to keep my rims round. It seems there was some confusion about weighting pegs.

    On two track, or singletrack trails I dart back and forth all over the place to avoid the square rocks. It's very effective to weight the inside peg to get around said rocks. It let's me stand upright, and putting all my weight on the left peg steers the bike to the left as well as tilting the bike to the left.

    That's just one technique that works for me and others in that situation. When seated, and making a turn under throttle I certainly weight the outside peg and my other foot is always out at the front axle to put weight on the front tire.

    The front tire needs that extra weight because... It's getting lighter as you accelerate through and out of a corner.



    More time is all you need. And maybe a lighter bike? After about 50 hours of dirt work, it will start coming together for you.

    Try airing down your tires a little also. Make consecutive runs in the same area letting 2-3 psi out each time untill it feels better. 12-16 psi will be better for most anything, exept for fast on pavement. Carry a pump to air back up to street pressures.

    Some training would be nice too, If you can arrange it.
    #45
  6. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Seat time is the answer to many questions.
    #46
  7. makazica

    makazica Been here awhile

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    In four pages this is the best advice you got....
    In other words, spend less on books and more on fuel, you might spend some on a pair of knobby tyres...
    #47
  8. bobnoxious67

    bobnoxious67 Baby steps...

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    Which part of my last post did you decide to ignore?


    Noob trying to ride in dirt on a bike that is clearly not a dirt bike, and all the experts try to give him advanced raceing advice:puke1
    #48
  9. bobnoxious67

    bobnoxious67 Baby steps...

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    Good advice:deal
    #49