HP2 Ohlins cartridge from Fast Bike Industries

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by configurationspace, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Figured out why that bolt wasn't coming out. I've been reading the Marzocchi manual when I should have been reading the BMW manual. The bolt is connected to the damper tube. Looking down the tube you can see a big hex end. Here's a picture of it:

    [​IMG]

    BMW has a special tool to grasp that bit. So far everything has been easy-peasy in terms of torque so I figure I only need a little leverage to hold that bit in place... Letsee what I can do.

    I've never met a Swede name Andreani. No concerns here. I'd just like to get this done before tomorrow night!
    #21
  2. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Heh! CS defeats the BMW special tool.

    All the torques so far have been pretty mild, so I went on a hunch and shoved a fat zip tie down the tube. That was enough to hold the hex part in place.

    Voila.

    [​IMG]

    Once the hex bit is undone, the internals slide out and you have a hollow tube:

    [​IMG]
    #22
  3. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    The right fork is similar, except this is the one with the damper unit on the bottom, a "proper" fork. We will re-use the damper from this fork with the new internals.

    In short, first unscrew the top cap:

    [​IMG]

    Push the spring down, attach the two wrenches and unscrew the top cap completely.

    [​IMG]

    Then apply the same zip-tie trick and unbolt the damper.

    [​IMG]

    On the right is the old damper, on the left is the new replacement damper. The old damper needs to have its washers adjusted to match the new one. That's what the little pile of washers on the left is for.
    #23
  4. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    [​IMG]

    New units in the foreground (sans springs), old units in the background, with springs. From this perspective it sure looks like Adreani is the original fork manufacturer for the HP2. Anyone know if that's true? Or is Adreani just another name for Marzocchi?

    And here are the two units with springs, side by side.

    [​IMG]

    If I was to guess I'd say the FastBike internals modify the BMW HP2 "light" version of the "Marzocchi Shivers" to *actual* Marzocchi Shivers. I'll ask David if that's what's going on.

    Oh, and the springs are on the wrong side of the cartridges in those photos...
    #24
  5. GSMarc

    GSMarc Long timer

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    I think it's right, see post #23 here

    http://www.quellidellelica.com/vbforum/showthread.php?t=349123

    seems that the upgrade is not famous, see post # 36, last sentence

    Some installs Ohlins TTX material but you must also buy the springs:

    Cartridge Kit FGHO 1094 shall be used together with
    Öhlins Front Fork Springs part no. 08775-xx.
    For rate recommendations, see Owner’s Manual/ General Mounting Instructions.




    http://www.andreanigroup.com/it/sho...oId=11261&modelloRepartoId=12019&reparto=moto
    #25
  6. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    FYI, the springs David at Fastbike Industries provided are a 5.0kg/mm linear response rate spring. He offers a range of options and I went with a fairly typical setup.

    The stock springs BMW provides are about a 4.5kg/mm spring although I don't know if they're linear response.
    #26
  7. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Next step, reconfigure the old damper for the new set-up. This amounts to unbolting the top, and replacing the shim stack. The OEM damper has six shims on it, and David's shim stack seems to be intended as just a replacement of that stack rather than an adding-on-to.

    [​IMG]

    This is just after sliding the new shim stack on the old damper. You can see the top of the damper (end of the threads) is a little chipped and deformed. It looks to me like this might have been overtorqued at some point? I should probably replace that unit the next time I change the oil on the shocks.

    Now the two units are essentially the same.

    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. JohnTz

    JohnTz HP2 Rider

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    The fact that they are not Ohlins explains the price difference. Those Ohlins cartridges are sweet but expensive buggers.
    #28
  9. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Putting them back together is much like taking them apart. The Marzocchi torque specs are a little tricky to read as they use different terminology for the objects when torquing them from the names used in the figures or elsewhere in the manual... and torquing appropriately without the proper locking tools is further akward, primarily the base valve. I'll wait to torque the top caps properly until the forks are mounted on the bike and I'll double-check the torque on the base valve later once the bike is operational again -- use the trick of tying-down the bike, compressing the forks to create the needed lock.

    Clean the hole, and place the valve in...

    [​IMG]

    You then slide the internals in the tube. In my case, I had a little trouble. You can see in the photo below, the holes at the top of the tube have a little "lip" on them -- some kind of manufacturing process left-over. This wouldn't let the cartridge slide in. So I rounded off the lip.

    [​IMG]

    Here's what it looks like stuck:

    [​IMG]

    Fill with oil. I used little paper strips to check the oil level. They want the oil level to be 9cm from the top of the tube.

    Torque appropriately...

    [​IMG]

    And pop the top on.

    [​IMG]
    #29
  10. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Woot! Everything is torqued appropriately and back on the bike... I have no surprising spare parts, and I took about 8 times as long as a professional. :lol3

    [​IMG]

    But I feel good.

    [​IMG]

    I've got all the preload settings 15 below max. Time for a test ride, finally.
    #30
  11. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Rebound damping much improved over stock. I haven't adjusted the damping fully but so far it's a very nice improvement. The springs are noticably stiffer. Will have to try hitting some big things to see how it responds. Maybe tomorrow sometime I'll get a chance to exercise it some more.
    #31
  12. Big Bad Ron

    Big Bad Ron Gnarly Adventurer

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    And you did all this in the bathroom?
    I would be so dead.
    Nice work!

    Ron
    #32
  13. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    My bathroom is my garage. :1drink

    Thanks for the kind words.
    #33
  14. Mav

    Mav Something witty...

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    Thanks for the right up - you make it look suspiciously easy!

    Did you get a chance to go riding yet?
    #34
  15. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Yes, I've been out twice now. Haven't tried it on any big jumps (just little ones). The verdict is it's a very solid upgrade on the stock shocks. The two most noticable things are the stiffer shocks and the more solid and tweakable rebound damping. Unfortunately I've never ridden a bike with a super flashy suspension so my range of comparables is pretty limited. But the suspension feels better than ever. For example, the stock shocks I could get to seriously dive with enough weight or via heavy-enough stopping. These don't dive, at least not under normal circumstances that I've been able to generate.
    #35
  16. Mav

    Mav Something witty...

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    Thanks for the update - sounds very promising.

    Like you, I don't really know anything about suspension only that people teaching me are telling me I'm reaching the limit of my current set up.

    Out of interest, what do you have for rear suspension?
    #36
  17. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Still running the stock air shock. When it's properly pressurized it's fine but it sometimes can be a bit of a chore ensuring it's properly pressurized -- passengers, or other load changes and such. It also acts a little strangely when hot but most of the time I'm fine with it. More than anything I like how light it is.

    Recently when going over jumps I've been noticing the rear end bucks up a bit too much. But I think I've got the shock overpressurized.
    #37
  18. Visian

    Visian Look out!

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    if you like rebound damping you'll love a hydraulic rear shock.

    The air shock has practically none, and that's why the rear end bucks up.

    my old HP2e had an air shock which I am convinced caused me to crash and total the bike.

    my new HP2e has an Ohlins rear, difference is night and day.

    I lust after fork inserts, now. Great report... thanks.

    .
    #38
  19. lurkin

    lurkin Been here awhile

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    Great report,,, Just ordered a set from Dave,,,,,,,,, Hope they work as well upsidedown here in Australia :rofl
    #39
  20. Warthog

    Warthog TeutonicChronic

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    Great post CS, thanks for the report. Things I have feedback on:
    1. Air gap of 90mm to 100mm seems to be a good amount of air at the top for spirited riding. Any less than 90mm and that fork will get very stiff towards the end of the stroke (I've done it at 70mm air gap).
    2. OEM springs are linear rate, not progressive. Progressive springs will show windings that are close together towards one end, such as the Wunderlich.
    3. Rebound control in the stock HP2 Marzocchi fork is definitely an issue. Rebound control (lack of) becomes more of an issue with progressive springs, or stronger linear springs, such as the 5+kg springs. The fork compression behaves better, but then you notice you can't dial in a good rebound control. I think those inserts take care of that.

    In regards to the stock air damper on the rear - in my experience the lack of rebound control is a serious issue. Safety is compromised as you ride that pogo stick down a rutted or potholed dirt road at 60mph. At 80mph, you are right on the edge, with the tail end smacking you in the ass, skipping and skittering over the hard edges. Install hydraulic shock.
    #40