Hydronic heat and floor type

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by eddyturn, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. eddyturn

    eddyturn Wannabe

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    I am looking for a little input on what floor covering to get for our hydronic floor. Brand new house and have a gyp-crete floor with in-floor heating pipes. We selected a processed wood product from Mohawk that promptly (some even before install) warped and curved. It's called a floating floor but isn't the way it should be. We have spots in our floor that are elevated an inch or two - clearly a defect but Mohawk says they will not cover it. Seller/installer of the floor will cover it as it is clearly not right and you bounce when you walk around.

    So... they will not install this type of product again - the floating floor so I am not sure I can trust them to advise on the next/best type of flooring to replace it. Any suggestions and why? Room space is about 30 x 23 if that makes a difference.
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  2. 4power

    4power Been here awhile

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    Not enough expansion space. Glue down engineered would be a better choice.
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  3. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

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    Stained concrete, Tile or stone would be very comfy with hydronic heat. Area rugs as needed.

    A wood floor or other less dense (read: insulating) floor almost defeats the whole purpose of in floor heat.
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  4. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Tile. And if you like wood, get a long narrow porcelin tile with a wood grain and staggered seams.

    The tile will become part of the thermal heating and will be very comfortable and warm on the feet. Wood acts as an insulator against the heated floor.

    That being said, your floor wasn't installed properly. I also have an engineered bamboo floating floor in our MB that has floor heating. No problems in 8 yrs.

    Is it possible that water got underneath the floor and caused this expansion? Were there sufficient expansion gaps on each end?

    Good luck.
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  5. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

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    More specifically, was the gypcrete allowed the time to properly cure before throwing the wood floor on top? There's a lot of water in that lightweight concrete...
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  6. eddyturn

    eddyturn Wannabe

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    Yes, that crete did have a lot of water but it was poured about 4 weeks prior to the floor install. The installer had a couple of pieces for the inspector that were very curved. We noticed an open box when the stuff arrived and some of those piece were curving even then. I think it was a combo of installer error and product not working well in CO with 10% or so humidity.

    When they installed it over a 2 day period, they covered it with red paper right away and nothing was spilled on it. When the cover came off and we started walking on it that's when the issues in multiple places were noticed. They did leave enough room for expansion according to the inspector so no fault with that.

    We really would like wood and the glue down might be the option for that. Wifey and I will have to take a look at just doing tile instead. I have seen some woodgrain tile that looks pretty good and some that looks pretty bad. I had not thought of wood being an insulator but that makes sense. When it is warm though you do feel it.

    Thanks for the input guys! I do appreciate it.
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