I cannot tell a lie...

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by kittty, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

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    Kittty - this has been a fun exercise, thinking about classic bikes.

    I think the HD is the fit for what you describe. The dealer near me lets me demo the bike I want to buy for up to half a day with no obligation. I have bought 2 bikes from them before, so they know I'm not BSing them. I suspect your dealer would do the same. That gives you a few hours in the saddle to see if it feels, sounds, looks like the right fit.
    Then it might just be about timing. Fall is a great time to buy a bike. Model year is coming up and people and dealers don't want to have to store a bike over winter.
    That is my unrequested buying advice :-)
    I'm sure whatever you decide will be fun. Enjoy the ride.
  2. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    The problem is, it's just getting really hard to find new bikes with the features, character and soul of vintage bikes. Aside from HD, the Enfield and the Ural Solo are about it. I had completely forgotten about the Ural, I went to their site and looked. That Solo does look good, and I have a Ural dealer not to far away, I might just go check one out. My biggest concern is that they are made in Russia, and with the shaky relations between the U.S. and Russia right now, I wonder about future parts availability.
  3. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    read the thread here about why not to buy a ural. If you like repairing you bike ever week or so, crappy gas mileage at 35 MPG then go for it. a Few people have put real BMW air head engines in them. Don't get me wrong it you don't mind doing as your grandfather did when he road a bike they re nice. It's a 1941 engine no matter how you update it and it's going to take 1941 motorcycle riding skills to keep it going . No riding week in and out with no thoughts of doing anything. You would be better to spend 5 grand a 1970 something BMW airhead bike instead. Even an old BWM R 60 or r65 airhead with a side car is better then these.

    [​IMG]
  4. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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  5. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    That's revealing - to me.

    Now me, I started with a Super Beetle...and ENDED with the Fox. Just that vee-dubs were getting less "people," more money, and less reliable. The Fox was the ex's car; she loved it for the time we were together...three years after the purchase. She had the two-door; I lusted for a wagon. But there was serious consideration VW would leave the States...in 1990 their sales were disastrous.

    But...retro always has to have an underlying theme to it. I wouldn't go crank a car because the Model T had a crank.

    Would I get a "classic" bike? HELL, NO. A "classic" American cycle had HAND SHIFTING. No-effin-WAY. Did the Japs introduce toe-shiftng, or was it the Brits? Doesn't matter...the old way SUCKED.

    The "old" way had you spending a day tuning dual or triple carbs. So...should I bemoan the rise of fuel injection. FARK, NO. I CELEBRATE it.

    Nostalgia can be fun. But when it costs in mileage; or demands, as in maintenance or drivability...time to end the game.

    Fuel-injected, Japanese-designed, CVT-transmissioned, two-wheeled-vehicles...are where the future is at. As I see it.
  6. hexnut

    hexnut Been here awhile

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    Harleys had foot shifts way before any Honda hit our shores..

    http://www.classic-car-history.com/harley-davidson-k-model-history.htm

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1955-harley-davidson-fl-hydra-glide.htm
  7. kittty

    kittty ScooterGirl

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    So. Started the motorcycle safety course today, purposely took a Suzuki TU250x to try it out. Holy hell what a soulless machine. The sound, the smell, nothing about it appealed to me. I lusted for lunch break to get back on my Stella.
  8. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Well...then.

    Your taste is your taste. Just as mine is my own....aside from the Federalized muffler on the TU250X, which gives a George Jetson burble...I don't know what could be not to like. I found the handling to be superb; the seating roomy and comfy...only thing it lacked was top-end.

    For a short time, I had the mistake of having the TU250's earlier big brother, the S650 Savage, a single-cylinder with a carburetor. THAT thing was NOT an easy ride...not when cold. It took almost twenty minutes of warming up before it would pull without backfires or hiccups.

    One more reason why I celebrate fuel injection.

    You have to find what you like; and build on it. I admit to being puzzled...I don't see much in common between a Stella and a Sportster. Whatever you like is A-OK; but to find it, you have to know what it is and spell it out to people who can get it for you.

    Good luck.
  9. kittty

    kittty ScooterGirl

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    It had an electrical buzz to it. The engine sounded like a jet muffled by fans. It had a pathetic little rev to it. It smelled like a vacuum cleaner.
  10. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    The smell is the result of what's required by our keepers in Washington.

    When you run ethanol gasoline through catalytic converters...you get that smell. Older machines won't have that; because they were built to earlier standards or none at all.

    But even H-D has to comply with emissions systems and converters. FWIW.
  11. kittty

    kittty ScooterGirl

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    I understand. But at least it doesn't sound like a convection oven.

    Maybe I won't find a newer bike that I can deal with. I really had no idea how much I hated FI until yesterday. My Stella has been nameless so far, but I've realized now how intoxicating her aroma is, and this is inspiring names.
  12. John Fabian

    John Fabian Fabe

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    Kittty - Consider scooters with larger wheels like the Honda SH 150i. Larger wheels make a world of diffrence. I did a 7,000 mile tour on a 150cc scooter this summer.

    I am very fond of Royal Enfield motorcycles and plan on purchssing one in the spring of '13. If they had CVT transmisions I would think they are perfect. I just watched a documentary called "The Highest Pass" where 350cc Royal Enfields were driven over the highest pass in India, over 18,000 feet! A testament to the riders and machine.
  13. kittty

    kittty ScooterGirl

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    That Honda could not be further from what I desire.

    No CVT, no plastic, and some rumble and oil and grit.
  14. John Fabian

    John Fabian Fabe

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    I misinterpreted your original post. The Royal Enfield is a great choice.
  15. Thinc2

    Thinc2 Paciugo

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    :thumb :thumb :thumb

    That sums it up.
  16. Blue Ridge Wheeltor

    Blue Ridge Wheeltor Been here awhile

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    There seems to be a lot of misinformation on here.
    Let me start by saying I am no mechanic. I can change oil, change plugs, and other than that I just follow directions.
    There is too much emphasis placed on finding a close dealer. With the internet, parts and tech help is a few keystrokes away.
    Right now I have four bikes, and will be paring back soon, and can't decide which to let go. I like bikes with soul and character. I do mostly local driving and stay off the highway.

    I have a '72 Triumph Bonneville 5 spd. Nice bike, but it may go first. It has sat for a while, and I need to get it together.

    '77 HD Cafe Racer. Head turner for sure, but not a real good bike. This will probably end up a weekend piddler. I've owned it since new, so it has history with me.

    2008 Royal Enfield Deluxe. Last of the Iron Barrels.
    The bad: Crappy drum brakes, though there are mods that make it better.
    Crappy electric start, lots of guys remove it.
    Horrible OEM tires, but Dunlop K70 is a good, reasonable alternative.
    The Good: 65 mpg.
    Happy cruising at 55
    Backroads bike, loves the twisties.
    Huge aftermarket parts.
    Cheap, cheap parts.
    Dealer network sucks, warranty is not transferable, but it is a simple bike.
    Plenty of low mileage bikes on ebay etc priced cheap.

    2006 Ural Patrol. My favorite bike. 23,000 mi and no problems. Soul, character, fun. Simple fix bike. Tremendous warranty. Built like a tank. Parts are no problem. Several great dealers around, but none close.

    If I could only have one bike, it would be the Ural.
    If I could only have one two wheeler, I would sell all and buy a Ural sT solo. Carbs, disc brakes, a modern BMW airhead. Great factory support. Great forum support (www.sovietsteeds.com).

    Someone mentioned they hesitated because they were made in Russia. Most of the components are from elsewhere. Alternator is Desno. Ignition is Ducati. Brakes are Brembo, Forks are the same as those on the 750 Guzzi.

    Kitty, you have a dealer near Boston that carries a lot of bikes. Might be worth a visit, just keep in mind his prices are higher than most.
  17. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I totally agree. I have done a lot of research, and it does look like the Enfield and the Harley are the only 2 relatively modern bikes I would be interested in, but I would want an earlier carbureted model of either one. To me, bikes are about passion, and there is just nothing about modern bikes to be passionate about. They are efficient transportation appliances, but they leave you cold as ice as far as feelings are concerned. The Suzuki S40 is probably the simplist and most antiquated bike the Japanese make. One big cylinder, a carburetor, and as someone mentioned, it requires some fiddling. It also makes a nice sound with an aftermarket pipe.

    I have sold my EX500 Ninja since I was last here, as a machine it was drop dead boring, but I loved the kind of riding it was capable of. Unfortunately It just got too painful for me to ride. I could not twist myself up into the necessary riding position it required.

    I am considering going in a completely different direction from a Harley, though there are plenty of cheap carbed Sportsters around. I have always loved 2 strokes (my first bike at age 8 was a 2 stroke Bultaco) and may get another. The price on 2 stroke street bikes has gone into orbit, but you can still get 2 stroke dual purpose bikes at reasonable prices. One of these bikes would suit my needs. Premix fuel, hard to start (until you learn how) kickstarter, drum brakes, lots of 2 stroke smoke, and they are greasy and oily. And they make that wonderful 2 stroke sound. Much like a motorcycle equivalent of the Stella (which BTW I will keep forever)

    The golden age of scooters, motorcycles, and cars is over, and it will not be back. The last "real" cars were made in the early '70s, before safety bumpers and emissions crap took over. It only got, and is still getting worse from there. Bikes held out a bit longer, but they are now going down the toilet as well. Vespa left a big hole in the scooter scene when they pulled out of the U.S. market, and when they came back, they had the same crap the Japanese were peddling.
  18. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

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    What about a cafe racer bike someone has already done up and moved on from?
    They are around and if properly done, are pretty reliable.
    That fills the "authentic" and "reliable" requirements.
  19. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

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    BTW - I took a 120 mile ride on my Ural today. It was great. I just don't think you would need another speed limited machine. You could use something interstate capable. Maybe the new Royal Enfield fits the bill. It is very different than the RE I had. I hear top speeds ate close to 80mph. Maybe a Ural solo? Still has carbs.
  20. Forde

    Forde Been here awhile

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    all new bikes and most older ones sound like sewing machines with the standard pipes

    just buy something old and put a louder exhaust on it