I give up. Which chain oiler should I get?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Jamie Z, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. Laconic

    Laconic Anodyne

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    Recalculating...
    Thanks.

    Actually, it was your comment about Suzuki not wanting to maximize chain life on the V-Strom that I didn't understand.
    #81
  2. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    Tongue and cheek :D
    #82
  3. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    Install of the Brian Stokes PDoiler

    As promised, I would post if I decided upon a chain auto-oiler. Well here it is.

    I wanted an auto-oiler. Set it and forget it. Mission accomplished.

    I've used my Weestrom for the most part for long-distance touring. It's proven to be an excellent comfortable and highly economical mount for that purpose. I've gotten excellent life out of my chain/sprocket sets by servicing w/Dupont Teflon lube but have wanted to lower my maintenance time yet increase life.

    Further, I'm absolutely not interested in chain maintenance at the end of a 500 mi day, nor at the beginning of another. Call it what you like -- it is what it is. So, I researched auto-oilers ad nauseum. I wanted something simple, reliable (set it and forget it) and inexpensive. Most of them were very expensive and w/many moving parts. Others were very simple and gravity fed. I thought these too irreliable.

    I finally settled on the PDoiler (Positive Displacement Oiler).

    I bought it directly from the maker through his online ebay store. Interestingly enough, virtually all the oilers I found on the market came out of Europe and usually England. There was too the Chamelion chain oiler out of Quebec (basically a gravity unit w/an electronic valve), but I determined the PDoiler was a better value and is a positive feed (my preference) not gravity

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Motorcycle-auto...cycle_Parts&hash=item27b9187743#ht_692wt_1140

    The price was $106 usd and arrived at my door in 2-weeks.

    [​IMG]

    The instructions were clear and easy to follow.
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    The hardest part proved to be where best to mount the resevoir/dispenser.

    I finally settled on the right just aft of the rear brake fluid reservoir behind the subframe fairing on the Weestrom

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    Controller - adjust to meter out oil between 30sec (#9), 130sec (#1) intervals
    [​IMG]

    I didn't see any need to mount the controller near the handle bars. Once you determine what oil amount you want, it's basically set it and forget it. So, I decided to bundle it near my fuse accy box -- wired to a ignition switch controlled circuit per the instructions

    [​IMG]

    It's important to mount the chain supply line in a way that it's least suseptible to swing arm movement. I ran the line down and to the front of the swing arm pivot then underneath the swing arm. Plenty of self-adhesive anchors are supplied to secure the oil line. Here it is partially installed
    [​IMG]

    Next comes a very critical part of mounting the wick type end. It's critical because you don't want chain wip or the sprocket teeth yanking the line away. I mounted mine closer to the rear sprocket than Brain's recommendation thinking the closer to it the less likely the wick to be hit by chain wipping/slop and my other thought was that oil hitting the sprocket would be forced into the chain centrifically
    [​IMG]

    Next came cutting the wick to the adequate clearance from the chain
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The unit is self-priming but I primed the line so I could observe the performance straight away.

    I was really suspect of this delivery system in particular that wind and what have you would splatter oil everywhere else and the chain. I've always thought that it would be better to deposit the oil onto the sprocket as some of the others I've seen. But, this simple delivery system is proving to work better than I expected in several hundred miles.

    80wt gear lube is the prescribed lube but Mr Stokes says any lube oil will do in a pinch. The 75-90 I'm using is working very very well.

    Here's post install views of the chain with the timer set to max 9. There's no oil slung all over the place or puddles on the ground after being parked. Just a moist wick and moist chain. I've dialed it back to 7 now that the chain has a good initial moistening. I figure in a few more miles I should be able to determine what is optimum
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    My only gripe so far is servicing. The unit hold 100cc and is serviced via a dip tube. I used a large syringe. The instructions expect you to use an oil can. I found servicing rather clumsey with the syringe particularly finding a fit to the blue servicing tube provided. Next I'll source a suitable prescribed oil can that will be easy to carry on those long trips. A full service is supposed to last up to 5k mi.
    [​IMG]
    There's a "dip tube" cap affair that fits in the tube when in use. You remove that and insert this blue tube to service the unit.
    [​IMG]

    In my opinion, this unit is an excellent value and works exactly as advertised. I highly recommend it to anyone looking for very efficient chain oiling system. I think this is a must have for any chain driven long-distance motorcycle. The vendor appears responsive to customer needs.:deal
    #83
  4. hpsVFR

    hpsVFR Hoosier Daddy

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    Thanks for the post and pics, Allonsye.:clap
    #84
  5. WillyTheWimp

    WillyTheWimp Gangsta Adventurer

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    I use two different ones depending on where I am. At home I use this one
    http://www.sallybeauty.com/color-applicator-bottle/SBS-198070,default,pd.html?cm_vc=SEARCH

    Which is just a bottle like they use in a hair salon to do a hair color touch up, it costs about $2.

    On the road I use this one,
    http://www.tinactin.com/get-the-products.html

    Scroll down to the bottom for the Tinactin Foot Powder bottle. It's got a super tiny hole and is leak proof so easy to carry around. Walmart used to have a generic in the same bottle but I haven't seen it recently.

    What I put in the bottle is Automatic Transmission Fluid. I put some on the chain either every day or when I get gas which is about every day.

    You can easily put a drop on each link of the chain, it never gets unknowingly bent so that the lube isn't falling on the chain. It doesn't take that long to do and it's super cheap.

    I have to give credit to getting me started doing this to the Prof from www.f650.com. But after 130,000 miles and getting at least 20k out of each chain, unless they were broken by something going between the chain and one of the sprockets, I'm a happy camper.
    #85
  6. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    I like the idea of recycling a personal care product application bottle to carry lubricant on board and otherwise servicing my auto-chain oiler. Thanks for the tip Willy:wink:
    #86
  7. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    You've got to be one dumb mutha to do that to your hand.

    Trying to clean the chain with a rag while the engine is driving the wheel.. :huh
    #87
  8. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    My momma always said "life's a self-cleaning oven".
    #88
  9. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    You should get a scottoiler. They have been doing it a loooong time, they do it the best and they are not expensive. They also pay for themselves within the life of one chain (which it will typically double or even triple). You can run them on used engine oil, without any negative consequences, despite what their marketing men and the internet mechanics may claim. I got 44K out of my OE SV chain using a Scottoiler 80% of the time, that was old engine oil. I know a lad who got 105K miles (take that shaft drive advocates) from his original ZX-6R chain using one run solely on old engine oil. Oh, did I mention their customer service is the best of any company I've had any dealings with and that all their parts are available separately, very cheaply?

    They should come as factory fitment on everything with a chain other than race bikes, IMO.
    #89
  10. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    Folks on your side of the pond have been using chain oilers for years. For some reason, the idea just hasn't taken here.
    #90
  11. Antti

    Antti Been here awhile

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    Pro-oiler just works. New nozzle once a year and keep it filled with engine oil.
    Any temperature or oil viscosity doesn't matter. I have used it from -27 to 35C degs. And can be easily adjusted while driving.
    #91
  12. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Hard to beat a small petrol engine primer (squishy button) a 250ml bottle and some PVC tubing plumbed up to drop oil on the FRONT sprocket.

    The primer is mounted on a convenient panel, a small push and a few drops of oil go onto the chain. Since it drops on to the front sprocket there's no oil splatter on the rear tire.

    Uses ~250ml of oil every 20,000km ;)

    O.K. I do have to remember to push the button now and then, but that's no big deal - has most of the advantages of an auto chain oiler with none of the downsides. i.e. it's positive pressure, I don't push the button, no oil comes out - so no dumping the entire bottle of oil on the ground - or on the rear tire. Need more lube ?, press the button harder.

    Pete
    #92
  13. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

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    ...just installed new chain and sprockets on my V-Strom 650 and I installed the new Scottoiler eSystem.

    It is fantastic.

    It is controlled by a computer that has a three-axis accelerometer and it senses when the engine is running, when the bike is moving, and how fast the bike is traveling.

    It meters out the oil based upon bike speed and motion.

    It drops more all at higher speed, less oil at lower speed, and stops oiling when you come to a stop. You can manually override the flow rate and program the system to match your bike, and your preferences.

    It does NOT drip oil on my garage floor.

    I've only had it on the bike long enough for one nine hour test ride, but from what I have seen so far, it is an extremely well thought out and engineered system.

    I bought the extended reservoir "lube tube" and it appears that I will be able to ride for about 6,000 miles before having to refill this thing.

    She's a tad spendy, but the value in ease of use, eliminating time spent lubing, and perfect oiling execution, leads me to believe that this system is worth every penny.

    Cheers.
    #93
  14. gweaver

    gweaver NorCal is Best Cal!

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    Don't suppose you could come up with some sort of diagram or something? I can visualize the bottle and tubing to the sprocket, but how's the primer button plumbed in? The one's I'm familiar with are simply a bulb with no back. Got a link to an example? And then does that plumb in to the back of the bottle?

    Thanks,
    G
    #94
  15. xcgates

    xcgates Whaaa?

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    One idea I liked was using an old-style oil pump can, and a length of tubing that ended in a partially crushed piece of copper tubing.

    I know that's not a good description, but it's the best I can come up with right now.
    #95
  16. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    What ever application/installation one uses or invents, it's well worth the effort and investment in my humble opinion. As I've said in the thread before, one of the least things I care to do at the end or the beginning of the day when I'm on a long-distance tour, is having to muck around w/chain lubing what w/all the other things to deal w/when traveling away from home.:wink:
    #96
  17. xcgates

    xcgates Whaaa?

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    DamnyoualltoH-E-doublehockesticks!!!!

    I was perfectly happy squirting on the teflon chain lube until yesterday. :lol3

    Now I'm looking at ~$200 for a new chain and set of sprockets. I figure that if I'm planning on keeping the bike for more than 14k more miles (two service intervals) it will pay off getting one and switching to an oil chain lube.

    Hadn't quite realized how much a pain in the ass it can be when I'm too lazy to be constantly maintaining the chain. (First bike with a chain) Ignored the chain for a good 1.5k - 2k miles except for an occasional squirt with the generic Teflon lube, and I now have the horror of a having to tighten the chain. The horror.:lol3
    #97
  18. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    There are photos on VSRI somewhere. I couldn't find them quickly the other day or I'd have linked them.

    ASCII art Front sprocket ------------------Primer---------Bottle-----air vent


    The primers have a squishy plastic button on top, at the back two tubes and markings saying "in" and "out". Most places that repair small motors will have complete primers in stock as spares.

    "out" side goes to a hose which feeds into a hole drilled into my front sprocket cover.

    "in" side goes into one hole in the top of the bottle and goes to near the bottom of the bottle. Just drill two holes in the cap slightly too tight and force the tubing through.

    There's another hole in the cap which has a piece of hose fed in just through the top and leads up up high somewhere with some open cell foam stuffed in the end - just to let air into the system.

    Hardly ever needs filling, and since I got the doses right doesn't drip on the floor.

    Simple and as bulletproof as I've seen. Electronics is nice and all, but this doesn't need that complexity.

    Pete
    #98
  19. irishdec

    irishdec Been here awhile

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    Just use WD40 ,no mess ,carry a can anywhere -or buy it anywhere- I've used it for four years now ,put plenty of mileage up .prob.20k ,havent even had to tighten the chain once.
    #99
  20. ec90t

    ec90t Banned

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    I use a pro-oiler on my Vee and couldn't be happier. 20K miles and the chain and sprocket are still like new. I can adjust the flow with a single push of the button and forget about it the rest of the time. I did a bit of a write-up about the install on stromtrooper a while back.