I want to make my shiny thing shiny. Help?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by CodeMonkee, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    :eek1
    #41
  2. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    Yeah, it is pretty bad.

    I think I can make a dent in it. As you can see it looks much worse where the surface is dry, but when the tub is full and running most of it will be invisible - except the really bad spots like those near the filter which don't disappear when wet.

    The other thing is that it sits on a pile of railroad ties and those are rotting now. So eventually that will have to be replaced (I would either just remove it and replace the deck area where it is, or put a concrete platform there). At that point I may just replace the hot tub (but they are expensive! And I have lots of other house/property stuff I would rather spend money on).

    I would prefer to not spend my days off scrubbing on this thing, I have lots of other stuff to do, especially now that the weather is getting warmer and nicer (it is sunny out and supposed to get up to 60 today). I would rather be working on the landscaping, or organizing my man cave, or cutting up some firewood, or riding my motorcycle, or repairing my truck, or just sitting around doing nothing (which is mostly what I do).
    #42
  3. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    :clap I'm with ya'!
    #43
  4. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    It occurred to me today that maybe a pressure washer would make a dent in it. I borrowed one - 1400 PSI electric - and it did make a dent, but only if I used the needle point nozzle and held it about a quarter inch away. And it wouldn't even touch the really bad spots. :huh

    At that rate it was not too much better than scrubbing.

    So I pressure washed the deck and a few other things. I am thinking about getting a higher pressure gas engined pressure washer. Would be a handy thing to have around - I want to strip the deck later when the weather dries out, and repaint it with non-slip paint (it gets very slick in the winter, especially when wet).
    #44
  5. Krabill

    Krabill Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,910
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Try the Sno Bol. Seriously. It'll eat that lime and scale off there with no scrubbing required.
    #45
  6. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    I googled it, I don't think that brand is sold locally. I will keep my eyes open for it but I have never seen it before.
    #46
  7. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    Get a turbo tip, as well. I've stripped coatings off sheetmetal with one, backed by a 3500psi pump. I'd recommend Mi-T-M products, if you can find a dealer in your area. Karcher used to be the brand to get, but, they've outsourced production to offer cheap models found in box stores. I'm not sure which models are still made in Germany and offered in the US.
    #47
  8. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    Thanks.

    I need something like this for the tub:

    <object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/vtsF0uiFPrc?version=3&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/vtsF0uiFPrc?version=3&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
    #48
  9. Krabill

    Krabill Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,910
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Walmart now sells it like this. Same stuff.

    [​IMG]
    #49
  10. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    :eek1 Look at the size of that hose and that it's being directed through such a small diameter wand. Talk about increasing the velocity.

    BTW, did you want to leave any of your fiberglass intact? :lol3
    #50
  11. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,750
    Location:
    Hiding off Hwy 6, B.C.
    Could you just fill up the tub and dump a bunch of Lime in it to soften the water.:ear I think that may eventually soften the deposits enough that the other chemicals may work.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lime_softening

    You probably don't want to dip in there when the lime is working. :evilHum....took the old pot off the wood stove yesterday, got to be 1/4" of deposits on it in places. I think I'll go dump some of the Hydrated Lime in it if just to see what happens.
    #51
  12. mudgepondexpress

    mudgepondexpress Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,182
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Have you ever considered sanding it and just repolishing it?

    You could use 1200 grit wet/dry with white vinegar as your lubricant. Sand lightly until you just break through your scale, then stop sanding. Next take a new car polish (I use pink "swirl mark remover) and buff it back to a new shine. This may sound labor intensive but it is probably quicker than anything you will currently find and much better on your health. You could use any good automotive conpound and buffer to bring back the shine. For the stuff under the water lever, I would just consider leaving it...it will look shiney underwater.

    You could use straight water as your lube also, I just think the vinegar will help break down the scale quicker.

    Kenny
    #52
  13. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    Since i've already tried a number of chemicals that are supposed to remove calcium deposits on contact, I am going to assume that this would not work in any short period of time (i.e., less than a year). I believe these are over a decade's worth of calcium deposits the POs never took care of - in part because a lot of it doesn't show up until you drain the tub and let it dry.

    What I am going to do is get a gas powered high pressure pressure washer and have at it. The 1400 PSI electric one I borrowed worked to a degree, just slowly, so I figure more pressure should do the trick. arr arr arrr

    <object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/6XUg5cfwilI?hl=en_US&amp;version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/6XUg5cfwilI?hl=en_US&amp;version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
    #53
  14. darenative

    darenative Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    211
    Hydrochloric/muratic acid will take it off. I mix it 1 to 1 with water to remove marine growth from boat bottoms. No adverse reactions with polyester gelcoat. No idea how it reacts with an acrylic finish. With the tub finish that f'ed up I'd at least try a test spot......
    #54
  15. Krabill

    Krabill Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,910
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Your are going through an awful lot of unnecessary trouble. Go down to your local walmart and pick up a bottle of Sno Bol, or Works (whichever brand they carry), squirt it on the tub and use a soft sponge to spread it around. You won't have to scrub at all, just spread it around. It will start dissolving the deposits immediately. With that much area, you might need more than one sponge because it will start to dissolve the sponge, too. Rinse it off and it'll be good as new.

    I'm only saying this because I've been in your situation and tried everything on the market. Sno Bol and Works (same stuff - different brands) is the only thing that works. Nothing else even comes close. It'll eat all that stuff away instantly and leave you with a shiny tub.
    #55
  16. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    From what I can find on the internets, the ingredients are different, but next time I go by Walmart I will try to get some (there isn't a convenient Walmart for me - it is about a 30 mile round trip to the only store local to me).

    I needed the pressure washer for the deck and the shop anyway. The electric one wasn't going to cut it.
    #56
  17. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    So I got a 3100 PSI gas powered pressure washer.

    :eek1

    Uhhhh - wow!

    Twice+ the pressure == double good!

    The rotating turbo tip was helpful too - recommended.

    Didn't totally erase the calcium deposits though. It did make a dent, but not as much as I hoped. Still feel I need a chemical solution to the problem.

    The gas pressure washer does take the paint off the deck faster than the electric one. A lot louder too. Gonna wait until the weather gets warmer and dryer before stripping the deck though. Hopefully going to paint the shop too, but that can wait. Want to blast the shop floor and then paint it with something non-skid too.

    The electric washer was fine for cleaning the mold off, but it would have taken way too long to strip the paint. Not sure it would have even worked on the shop at all.

    The deck (besides being an ugly purple color) is slippery as snot when wet and the mold has been growing on it, so I am thinking I will strip it down to bare wood, then stain it, then paint it with a clear paint and some anti-skid stuff (I think it is just sand mixed in with the paint).

    But get that done before next fall when it gets wet/cold/etc. again.
    #57
  18. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    I wouldn't recommend the Turbo tip, on your deck. It'll peel the wood, anywhere the grain is loose.

    Wear earplugs.

    I'd use a stain, with a sealer topcoat. You don't want any kind of paints/coatings on wood, as it'll peel and become a mess. With using a sealer, you can periodically clean your deck and not be peeling up some type of coating. Also, this means no texture, which is not bad thing, since the stuff has to be suspended in the aforementioned coating. If you keep up with regular cleanings, mold/mildew/algae growth won't be a problem. Oxalic acid (wood bleach) works great for cleaning decks and will kill bacteria growth.

    Likewise, with the garage floor, I prefer oil-based stain over paints. Stain penetrates and bonds to the concrete, but, paint only bonds to the surface. I've used stain in a garage that the PO processed frying oil for his diesel Mercedes. That shit was everywhere and the whole floor was sticky. Two doses of hydrocloric acid and pressure washing got it pretty clean, but, the oil was still coming to the surface. Oil-based concrete stain still penetrated and stuck to the surface. Whereas, paint would've just sat on top of the oil residue. Also, texture in coatings makes it more difficult to clean and will look dirty, over time. Keep in mind, coated aircraft hangars don't have grit for anti-slip.
    #58
  19. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    It might have worked for you, but The Works didn't work for me.

    I was in Home Depot today to get a venturi pump and noticed they had The Works so I bought a bottle of it. It was only $2, what was there to lose?

    Brought it home, put it on about half the problem areas, let it sit for about ten minutes, washed that off, then reapplied and let that sit for another ten minutes. Rinsed it off and let it dry.

    No difference that I could tell.

    Just now I went back out and put it on one small area and I will let that sit there for about 15 to 30 minutes. I don't hold much hope.
    #59
  20. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,673
    Location:
    Orygun
    I think this is my next thing to try. There is a filter cover I can try it on. If it ruins it then I can just get another cover.
    #60