Iceland and Faroe Islands 2014 – “Doing it in style”

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Heimdall, Dec 7, 2014.

  1. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    First of all let me explain the title. We met a Scottish biker named Paul on the ferry over to Iceland.
    He intended to spend the whole trip riding the gnarliest F-roads while camping and had brought most of the food he was going to eat with him, all this was an impressive high rise building on the pillion seat of his BMW 800GS.
    Upon hearing that we intended to spend most of, if not all of the trip sharing rooms in hotels or guesthouses he exclaimed (with that awesome Scottish accent that made the Romans so nervous they built a wall): Ahh, you're doing it in style!
    I’ve never really seen it that way since sharing a room we tend to come out of it pretty cheap but I can see how the warm beds and hot showers could add some flair compared to going full out Bear Grylls.

    I do think my mechanic really doubts my sense of style though, he has now called me twice with updates asking what have you done to this motorcycle?

    Well this is my story and I'm sticking to it:

    28.7.2014 Day -3 Vaese, Sweden - Hirtshals, Denmark

    Me and my travel companion Bear (name changed to protect the guilty) set off from the truck stop were we had agreed to meet at about ten o’clock .
    With all the gear we were bringing I felt like we were almost as heavily laden as the big rigs at the truck stop.
    We had plenty of time to get to the ferry crossing over to Denmark which inevitably led to us mucking about, drinking coffee (just me, but I do drink enough for the both of us) and just generally taking it to slow. All in all we caught the check-in for the ferry with 60 seconds to spare.

    Once across Kattegatt we went straight for the Hotel in Hirtshals, I had booked it through the Agoda booking site and had no idea how late the reception was open so off we went.
    Now walking into a hotel reception in bike gear, I bit worse for wear after a long day in the saddle you sometimes don’t really get the treatment you deserve (or maybe I’m just a complete asshole and DO get what I deserve, I’ll just leave that open to interpretation).
    This was one of those places, Hotel Strandlyst obviously thought themselves far to posh to cater to some bearded bikers, I don’t know if it’s because of the 90’s biker wars or what the problem is but of all the places I’ve ridden the overall worst treatment I’ve gotten in hotels is in Denmark.

    The geezer in the reception claimed no rooms where available, no booking had been made and the booking site which happens to be one of the biggest in the world was completely unknown to him.
    We weren’t going anywhere with our “discussion” and had no plan B so I called Agoda and asked them to sort it out.
    They on the other hand called booking.com which apparently was known even in the great state of Denmark because in fifteen minutes (at 9.30PM) someone had mysteriously checked out and voila, a room had appeared.
    I do think we would have heard a thud or something had this really happened since there were no rooms in street level and absolutely no one passed us sitting in the reception the whole time.

    As we hauled our luggage to our room I really felt we were off to a bad start but as most times, a warm shower, a cold beer and a hot meal was all it took to cool my blood from boiling point.
    In all fairness even though the hotel sucked the restaurant was great. The food was good, the beer was cold and the waitress was cute.

    It will never be this clean again.
    [​IMG]

    Do yourself a favor and stay clear of this place.
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    29.7.2014-30.7.2014 Day -2 and -1 Hirthals, Denmark – Seyðisfjörður, Iceland

    After a sturdy breakfast we ride to the port and park along with all the other bikes, there were still two hours before we were to board so there was plenty of time to take in the atmosphere and scope out the “competition”.
    There really were all kinds of bikes, everything from small sportbikes on street tyres, a Gold Wing trike with trailer all up to the full on desertracer-kitted bikes that seemed to be there just as warmup for Dakar 2015.

    After checking in and unloading the gear in the cabin we hit the Taxfree and stock up on necessities before loading up a movie, we had been previously warned that there was little to nothing to do onboard so I had brought my traveling-laptop and portable harddrive filled to the brim.
    We eventually get our asses over to one of the restaurant onboard and had some food and the first little taste of the Faroese beer (best I’ve ever had) before we hit the sack.
    Pretty pleasant journey thus far but as I was to find out that’s just because we had been following the coast of Norway, at about 4AM I wake up because I feel as if someone just chucked me into a tumbledryer, obviously we had hit the open sea.
    I actually felt that I needed to cling to the bed to stop me from falling out so definitely no more sleep for me.

    Luckily we had prepaid breakfast and dinner for the whole trip otherwise we probably wouldn’t have eaten much, we were both a lite worse for wear thanks to the seas but we eventually dragged ourselves out of bed and hit the breakfastbuffé.
    The restaurant wasn’t exactly crowded when we got there so I guess we weren’t the only ones who felt the seas, Bear was a bit worse of than me so he just managed to eat a slice of melon before he threw in the towel and went back to the cabin.
    I actually thought I was doing pretty good until I did the mistake of looking up just to see someone further down the restaurant do a rocket-vomit with some poor bastard desperately trying to catch the mess with a barf bag mid-air.
    Result: Player 0 – Vomit 1 .
    I do my best impression of a catburglar and sneak some food for Bear past the restaurant staff when I leave.

    Lying down helps a lot when you’re feeling seasick so we loaded up another movie on the laptop.
    We stay like that until lunchtime, at lunch we meet a Scottish biker named Paul again who we first met on the ferry from Gothenburg.
    He introduces us to a Swede called Joakim and a German called Dieter. They were sharing the same cabin on the ferry.
    Joakim rode an Africa Twin which always gets me a bit nostalgic, it was the bike I had before I traded it in for the Tiger and I must say I do miss the old beast.
    Joakim had kitted his bike with the most brutal engine bars I’ve ever seen (we call it a moose-fence in Sweden) so like Paul he was obviously not planning to stick to the ring-road either.
    We hit the Skybar exchanging numbers in case anything should happen on Iceland and drinking a few beers. A few biking-stories were obviously exchanged as well.
    We eventually feel the need for something other than beer so we go to the only restaurant still open only to find that all that is available is sandwiches.
    Not great since I have milk-allergy and didn’t want to spend the rest of the voyage in the bathroom.
    I ask the staff if there really isn’t anything else and they say they’ll get something from the kitchen (which should have been closed by that time).
    The look on the other guys faces (who were chewing on some dry sandwiches) when this goddess of a woman brings me a grilled chicken with oven baked potatoes was absolutely priceless!
    That and the fact that the staff on the ferry speaks all languages known to man leaves me with a real good lasting impression of the staff on the M/S Norrona, I swear to god if one of the passengers where to speak Klingon I’m sure there will be someone in the staff that do too.


    Waiting to board the ferry in Hirthals.
    [​IMG]
    I am NOT a morning person (Photo by Bear).
    [​IMG]
    Strapping down the bikes on the ferry.
    [​IMG]
    This is how we spent most of the trip, the movie is The best bar in America btw, great movie!
    [​IMG]
    The ferry did a quick stop in Torhavn on the Faroe Islands before continuing to Iceland.
    [​IMG]
    Chicken! (photo by Bear)
    [​IMG]
    #2
  3. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    31.7.2014 Day 1, Iceland. Seyðisfjörður – Dittifoss

    We get of the ferry and park on a large gravel parking to rearrange our gear and put warmer clothes on, the weather wasn’t that bad about 14°C and cloudy but considering we came directly from +25° heat in Sweden and Denmark it not all that cozy either.

    It seems Paul didn’t even break pace going off the ferry so he’s already long gone, however Joakim and Dieter ask if we want to join them on the way to the biggest city in the east of Iceland, Egilsstadir to get some supplies and lunch. That of course we do.

    The minute we ride up on the fjell the temperature drops like a stone to +4° (there are handy signs at the side of the road with temperature and windspeed to tell you just how much you are actually freezing) and it rains and stops in five minute intervals.
    Just enough time to almost get your mind up about suiting up in raingear.

    So we arrive in Egilsstadir (at least I did) pretty cold and soaked, it really felt like the climate was telling us to get back on the ferry and back to where we came.
    We park at Netto supermarket in Egilsstadir to do some shopping, warm socks was already at the top of my list!
    After that we go across the road to a greasy spoon to get a bite to eat, we get the “dish of the day” which is fried lamb pork chops (with the bone still on them). It was pretty good once you learned what part of it you wouldn’t break your teeth on.

    After lunch Dieter and Joakim head of for some inland exploring and I start convincing Bear that the tent he bought for this trip probably would come to better use on a finer day (still raining at the time).
    After a lot of convincing I get the laptop and start searching for somewhere to stay, there aren’t a lot of options so we go for Grimstunga Guesthouse on the road to Dittifoss waterfall.
    At about €110 a night it wasn’t exactly cheap but the thought of a warm shower and a proper bed would definitely get me through the day.

    First we set off to the northwest point of Iceland called Dyrfjöll, it has been said that it was the inspiration for Tolkien when he wrote about “the black gates of Mordor” so it was pretty high on our to-do list.
    On the way, right in the middle of absolutely nowhere we find a green shed-like building which serves as a kind of self-catering solar-powered kiosk. Pretty cool idea.
    The landscape is stunningly beautiful, the roads are almost empty but my lord it is cold.

    I’m so glad I bit the bullet and ordered a Keiss heated jacket liner, and can only come to the conclusion that the guy who stated in a review that “you’ll never need the highest setting” has obviously never been to Iceland.
    Once arrived at Dyrfjöll the GPS tells me that it’s really still 8kms of walking to do before we’re actually there. Not really what we were up to so hadn’t it been for the great riding and sublime view it could have been written off as an utter fiasco.

    We stop to get some coffee on the way to Dittifoss and I already start to worry about gas I opt for getting gas before Dittifoss even though it would be out of our way, the Tiger is a thirsty beast and the pumps on the northern part of Iceland are few and far between.
    The Bear starts crunching the numbers and argues that with the cans (which I had considered to be a last resort) we’ll have plenty of fuel to spare without going out of our way.
    When the Bearminator T101 starts spewing out calculations I get a migraine so I’d rather just trust that he knows what he’s doing.
    When it comes to numbers he’s usually right.

    We ride on to Dittifoss, according to the guidebook in pure volume of water it’s the most powerful waterfall in all of Europe and I don’t doubt it one bit, my god what a sight it was.
    The road up to Dittifoss was a washboard of black gravel and on a few places submerged in water where it was a lot more comfortable to go fast and ride over the ridges so we were passing a lot of rentalcars on the way, I could help thinking about the Gold Wing Trike with the trailer.

    We ride from Dittifoss to Grimstunga Guesthouse and are greeted by the lady of the manor.
    After check-in she asks if we want food, considering the meal was €33 I did expect to be asked maybe what we’d like to eat that was obviously not the way it worked around these parts. It’s food, yes or no.
    We decided yes and we’re pleasantly surprised when she at least asked if we’d like to get settled first… for a microsecond before she changed her mind and stated “it’s better for me if you eat now”, “You eat now. Dinner is there”.
    It was pretty hilarious really, she reminded me of Consuela in Family Guy.
    I had already said that I’m allergic to milk but when the dessert arrived with a mountain of cream on it I didn’t really want to make a fuss so I just ate around the cream and left the rest. (The repercussions of this will be severe.)
    After dinner we get a shower and crawl in to bed, even though the rooms were very small I was happy as a clam and truly felt sorry for the German guy who slept in a tent outside in the field that was pretty much submerged.

    This is how we rode throughout the two week trip.
    [​IMG]

    Arriving in Seydisfjordur.
    [​IMG]
    The strange kiosk by the side of the Road.
    [​IMG]
    With roads and views like this it doesn’t really matter if you get where you’re going (riding shots by Bear, GoPro helmet cam)
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Coffeebreak on the way to Dittifoss, one of the best accessories I’ve ever bought. The boiler did struggle to get the water warm though. (photo by Bear)
    [​IMG]
    Dittifoss waterfall
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Code:
    <iframe width="464px" height="348px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" src="//ilo-static.cdn-one.com/iloapp/gallery/html/embed.html?albumId%3D0%26videoId%3D102%26galleryLocation%3Dgallery%26domainName%3Djensenclan.se%26pUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fdata%2F_gallery%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780420288966300_thumb.jpg%26nUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780420288966300_normal.mp4%26mUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780420288966300_mobile.mp4"></iframe>
    Grimstunga guesthouse
    [​IMG]
    #3
  4. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    1.8.2014 Day 2 Dittifoss – Stornutjarnir

    Consuela keeps up the style and right at breakfast asks, “You don’t eat pie yesterday! Sorry for cream! You want pie now?! You eat pie now! I get pie.”
    There wasn’t even a microseconds pause after the question, I mean who want’s apple-pie for breakfast, seriously?

    First stop of the day is at a petrol station, but on that short ride the heavens give birth to a torrential rain and I’m soaked right through to my underwear. Not the best start to the day.
    Filled up with petrol and suited up in raingear we make our way to the Kafla geothermic power plant. We had set our sights on some kind of guided tour but had to settle for pictures and video but the coffee was fresh and free so that totally made up for it.

    After our mini-tour of Krafla the rain stopped and next stop is just across the road on Namafjall geothermal field, I could fell the smell seeping in to my full-face helmet already from the ringroad.
    As soon as I got my helmet of the smell hit me like a punch, the air was so thick with sulfur you could almost taste it in your mouth.
    We make our way round but at the end of it I really had to pick up the pace to get away from the place before adding to the already acidic content.

    We head off for the Grjotagja-cave, as a Game of thrones fan this was right at the top of my to-do list since this had been featured in the series. Apparently a lot of the footage from “beyond the wall” was filmed in the Myvatn area.
    It was time for lunch so we had our premiere of the field rations we had brought with us, you just put the bag of food in a heater bag, add some water to start the process and wait twelve minutes and voila, no matter where you are you’ve got a warm meal.
    We had brought enough of these with us to have them for lunch every day of the trip and it wasn’t only practical seeming how prices in Iceland seems to rise exponentially it was a pretty cheap meal too.

    Off we go to Dimmuborgir, as a metalhead this was extra cool there being a well-known black metal band of the same name.
    The place Dimmuborgir (which translates to “the dark castles”) is according to Icelandic folklore the entrance to hell.
    The weather had taken a turn for the worse again so with the dark skies above it really set the tone, it really was a dark and mystical place and a truly spectacular experience.

    We continue our lap around the Myvatn (midgewater) lake before trailing off to Godafoss waterfall.
    Godafoss translates to “waterfall of the gods” gets its name because one of the founding fathers in the Icelandic Allthing threw his remaining relics of the Norse gods into the waterfall after converting to Christianity.
    Truly a magnificent sight, worthy of gods.
    It wasn’t far from here to where we where going to stay for the next couple of days, Hotel Edda Stornutjarnir (about €135 per night including breakfast).
    We had opted to stay there for two days since we where going to spend the next day in Husavik, riding Icelandic horses and whalewatching.

    Krafla geothermic power plant
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    On the way to Namafjall geothermic field (photo by Bear, Gopro helmet cam)
    [​IMG]
    Namafjall
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Code:
    <iframe width="464px" height="348px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" src="//ilo-static.cdn-one.com/iloapp/gallery/html/embed.html?albumId%3D0%26videoId%3D122%26galleryLocation%3Dgallery%26domainName%3Djensenclan.se%26pUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fdata%2F_gallery%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780495652710900_thumb.jpg%26nUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780495652710900_normal.mp4%26mUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780495652710900_mobile.mp4"></iframe>
    Grjotagja cave
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The Swedish chef, cooking up dinner (photo by Bear).
    [​IMG]
    Ready to head off to Dimmuborgir
    [​IMG]
    Road to Dimmuborgir (photo by Bear, Gopro helmet cam)
    [​IMG]
    Dimmuborgir
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Riding from Dimmuborgir to Godafoss waterfall (riding shots by Bear, Gopro helmet cam)
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Godafoss waterfall
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Code:
    <iframe width="464px" height="348px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" src="//ilo-static.cdn-one.com/iloapp/gallery/html/embed.html?albumId%3D0%26videoId%3D214%26galleryLocation%3Dgallery%26domainName%3Djensenclan.se%26pUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fdata%2F_gallery%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780691862381200_thumb.jpg%26nUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780691862381200_normal.mp4%26mUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141780691862381200_mobile.mp4"></iframe>
    #4
  5. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    2.8.2014 Day 3 – Husavik

    The destination of the day is Husavik, self proclaimed “whale watching capitol of Iceland”.
    We get on the bikes who feel light as feathers and fast as lightning seeing we had left almost all our gear at the hotel.
    Since it seemed like two of the must-do things on Iceland we had booked a combined horseback and whale watching tour with the company Gentle Giants in Husavik.
    We payed for the tour at GG head office and got directions for Saltvik stable since we were to start with the horseback riding.

    Let me just point out that this was on Bears to-do list, not mine and that I have a fear and suspicion of everything with equal or less than 1hp.
    The fear was probably pretty evident when were assigned horses because of all the 150 horses on the ranch I was assigned the most docile animal available and was assured that this is what small children usually get to ride.
    I don’t doubt it, it seemed like a glue-factory rescue and had it been any more docile instead of the clicking sound we were supposed to make to get the horses move I would have needed a defibrillator. Me and old faithful where obviously made for each other!

    We had luck with the weather and rode down to the ocean beach, once I realized my trusty stead wasn’t just luring me into a false sense of security while in fact contemplating a good ole stomping I must admit that it was a truly enjoyable experience.
    However I had heard that the special trot that the Icelandic horses have called the tölt would be a smooth and almost levitating experience. In my opinion it’s levitating in kind of the same way two scoops of frozen ice-cream and a banana levitates in a mixer... the second before they face ultimate destruction.

    From one gentle giant to the other, we headed back to Husavik and boarded the Faldur, a converted whaling ship now servicing tourists which actually is what’s happened to most of the whaling ships in Iceland, I guess that’s called progress!
    After about 45 minutes we see the first spray from a whale and it isn’t long before we see our first quick glimpse of a humpback whale.
    They are truly awesome and magnificent animals, all in all we saw four whales on our 2.5 hour tour, all of them humpbacks.

    Back in port we (I) got coffee, I felt like I must have drunk a gallon of it before I thawed, the rain had started on the way back so I felt like I had frozen solid.
    We did a tour of Husavik (which took all of 10 minutes) before heading back to the hotel.

    Saltvik Ranch
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    I have definitely had worse days (photo by Bear)
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Gentle Giants whale watching
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #5
  6. HighwayStar

    HighwayStar Mister

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    on the Highway to Hell
    Cool and interesting places... I am on board....


    :clap
    #6
  7. GentlyBentley

    GentlyBentley Lost Logger

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Oddometer:
    27
    Location:
    Northern Sealand, Denmark (Europe)
    Sorry to hear about your misfortune at Strandhotellet. Normally, people from Jutland are known for their hospitality and interest in strangers, so probably the guy has been from somewhere else. In your own country, I had the totally opposite experience a couple of years ago in Härnösand, at the Highway Hotel, where the hostess even gave me key to the boilerroom, so I could dry my clothes and tent over night.

    Good to see that part of Iceland again, a good friend of mine is part time district nurse, part time district forester in Vapnafjord. Can't remember where her district ends, but until now, you've pretty much roamed all of it. Looking forward to see the rest of your story!
    #7
  8. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,663
    Great report! Looking forward to the next episode. Do you recall the name of that Faroese beer you had on the ferry?
    #8
  9. skyguy

    skyguy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    180
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    Nice report and pictures!

    When were you there? I was there back in July; perhaps we crossed paths.
    #9
  10. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    I most definitely do. I was the Black Sheep Export a wonderful creation but my true nemesis was the Slupp Øl.
    Thanks. We probably just missed each other since we arrived with the ferry on the 31st of July and left Iceland on the 14th of August.
    #10
  11. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    3.8.2014 Day 4 Stornutjarnir &#8211; Sudureyri

    A classical saying among bikers (famous last words) is &#8220;it didn&#8217;t look that far on the map&#8221; and that is exactly the mistake I do today.
    I had looked on the map and booked our next stay at the Fishermans Hotel , Sudureyri in the Westfjords.
    I knew I had f**cked up when it took the GPSs what felt like forever to crunch the numbers, I had done a precalculation which came to 180kms which I naively thought might come to twice the distance after route calculation. It didn&#8217;t. It came back as about 600kms, which would be done mostly on gravel.
    To put this in a bit of a perspective the width of the landmass from easternmost to westernmost of the whole island is about 500kms. I&#8217;ll admit I&#8217;m no Einstein when it comes to math but I must have been pretty damn tired to do that mistake.

    Now we had a hotel to check in to and had no idea if or when the reception closed so no mucking about today we had some mileage to do!
    Not only where the roads magnificent scenically, the surface was pure bliss. They were also a total blast to ride so maintaining a speed of 100-110kms/h weren&#8217;t are problem&#8230; I thought.
    All throughout the day my trusty travelling companion did not share this info but I have since learned that my less gravel experienced compadre felt that maintaining this speed on gravel was something between continuous crisis management and near death experience. Kudos to him for keeping still keeping up the pace.

    Regardless of experience it was a very long day and we were more or less totally beat when we finally got to the hotel.
    Hardly had my side stand hit the ground when the manager of the hotel walks up, gives us a warm welcome, compliments the bikes and asks if we&#8217;re hungry.
    Starvation was more like it so when asked if he should tell the restaurant to hold a bit before closing the buffé we readily accepted.
    When he then by the reasoning that I&#8217;m not going to rent out any more rooms tonight anyway upgrades us free of charge to the largest room he had available he thus upgraded himself from all round good guy to legend.
    After stuffing our faces with the buffe and swallowing it all down with the local brew were almost ready to hit the sack.

    Now comes the really embarrassing part: after spending god know how long in the bathroom Bear comes back and asks me if I know how to get the frikking water running in the space shuttle they call a shower.
    I of course found this absolutely hilarious&#8230; until I stepped up to the launchpad.
    I must give a debt of gratitude to the night receptionist that didn&#8217;t laugh her ass off when a Swedish engineer and an electrician got bested by an Icelandic shower.
    I mean we weren&#8217;t even (that) drunk. :freaky

    And I almost forgot: when we arrived at the hotel my right fog light had shook loose during the day and was just hanging by the cable. Lucky I didn&#8217;t loose it and lesson learned: use threadlocker on things that are going to vibrate consciously for two weeks straight.

    Riding in the Westfjords (all riding shot by Bear)
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Houston, we have a problem.
    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    4.8.2014 Day 5 Sudureyri – Bjarkalundur

    I do sometimes learn from my mistakes so today I had done the math and calculated how far we could reasonable ride in a day and have come to the conclusion that there’s no way were going to ride the rest of the Westfjords in one day.
    So the next stay will also be in the Westfjords at Hotel Bjarkalundur , that would mean that todays riding will be about 400kms.

    I would be done mostly on gravel but the condition these roads are in it shouldn’t be a problem, we haven’t got a lot of “touristy” things scheduled for today, we’re going to ride out to a puffin colony at the westernmost part of not only Iceland but in fact Scandinavia as well.
    The riding was great and the even though it was cloudy it wasn’t raining either so no Max setting on the Keiss today.

    On the way to the puffin colony farthest in the Patreksfjördur there is the Gardar BA 64, a beached fishing trawler we wanted to have a look at so that would be out lunch spot for the day.
    Freaky fact: The Gardar was actually built in 1912 as whaler and was then named Norröna, the same name as the Smyrril Line ferry we arrived on.

    The Latrabjarg puffin colony was not exactly what I expected, being Europes biggest bird cliff I was naively expecting that you more or less wouldn’t be able to take a breath without getting a mouthful of puffin.
    In fact during our visit we saw only four of them but they are truly beautiful and magnificent animals and the view from the cliff was absolutely breathtaking.
    The puffins are ridiculously photogenic and completely ignorant of tourists, one landed right at our feet and strolled around like it owned the place.
    We snap away with our cameras like the tourists we are and get on our bikes and head for the hotel.

    A couple of hours later we stumble in to the hotel, sadly again we our reception is far from impressive.
    Again I’m grateful for booking in advance so we got the room but the manager made it absolutely clear that we were to go nowhere near his posh restaurant before getting out of our (I’ll admit, by that time pretty dirty) bike gear.
    After dinner I hit the showers, thank god for the spray nozzle because I’m sure it was the only thing keeping the ice cubes from slamming into my head. I also owe a debt of gratitude to whoever left the window open to let the soothing +10°C air in to warm a fellow weary traveller after that “refreshing” soak.

    Westfjords, riding to Patriksfjördur
    [​IMG]
    Gardar, beached steel ship
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Riding to Latrabjarg (photos by Bear)
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Latrabjarg bird colony
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Latrjabjarg to Bjarkalundur
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #12
  13. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    5.8.2014 Day 6 Bjarkalundur – Blönduos via Krossnes

    We really need to get our shit together, we’re pretty much riding around like headless chickens due to the first marathon-leg of the Westfjords, still we decide that the fact that we (ok, so it’s my job ) can’t navigate to save our lives shouldn’t stop us from doing what we set out to do. We do after all still have plenty of time.

    That’s why we decide to go east and take a dip in the Krossnes hot bath before getting out of the Westfjords.
    It would probably have been complete madness to “waste” a day like this hadn’t it been for the fact that the (gravel) roads up to Krossnes is some of the best riding we do on the entire trip. The surface is great, the weather is good (by Icelandic standards) and traffic practically non existent.

    After been banged around on gravel roads for a couple of hours it was a wonderful and surreal experience to for the princely sum of 450ISK (about €3) take a dip in the Krossnes pool with a spectacular view of the ocean. The pool in Krossnes is sometimes described as swimming at the end of the world, I can only second that statement.

    It was well worth the trip. I usually get pretty bothered when we have to double back the same road we’ve already ridden. Definitely not the case with the roads of the Westfjords, I was looking forward to it.
    We had about 450kms to ride today since we had strategically booked a hotel close to the 35 road to Reykjavik across the fjell. We had read (most likely somewhere on this forum) that of all the F-roads the 35 would be one of the best maintained and scenically beautiful.

    We check in to the Hotel Hunavellir in Blönduos and ask what time the restaurant closed (starving as usual). Not until 9PM so plenty of time.
    When we get to the restaurant at a quarter past eight the restaurant was unfortunately closed.
    This hotel is in the middle of absolutely nowhere and it's not like I'm going to starve myself so my sincerest apologies about the burn marks left by the field rations in the sink, they where very unfortunate.

    These rescue huts are scattered all across the fjells
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Riding to Krossnes (photos by Bear)
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Krossnes hot spring
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #13
  14. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,663
    Great report! Doing it in style...indeed! I really like the idea of those field pack meals. Thanks!
    #14
  15. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    Thanks.
    Yeah the readymeals where a real life saver, not only where they extremely practical but even though the shipping cost was horrible and I screwed up a bit by ordering heaters even for the meal packs that already had one included it still only came to about €8,5 per meal.
    That is a very cheap meal by Icelandic standards.
    [​IMG]
    It was an extra 6kgs to lug around but it was well worth it in shear practicality.
    #15
  16. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    6.8.2014 Day 7 Blönduos – Reykjavik

    So we decided to cross the fjell on the F35, this is however according to Garmin not possible.
    No matter where I point on that blasted road the helpful but very persistent lady that lives on my handlebars inform me that “there are no roads leading to your destination”.

    Apart from the standard Garmin City Navigator map I had also downloaded a free Topo-map from ourfootprints.de, this was not routable in the unit but I knew it was in Basecamp.
    I do realize that bringing a laptop along to book hotels and do route navigation isn’t exactly the gnarliest of all adventurous things but to quote the late Roald Amundsen: Adventure is just bad planning.

    So with a (hopefully) rideable route in the unit away we went and almost immediately we almost bit of more than we could chew, the road surface was just an abundance of fist sized rocks which the Heidenau Scouts couldn’t really dig into so it felt more like surfing than riding really.
    It was by no means unrideable but I did think that at the pace we were coasting along we were never going to get anywhere near Reykjavik in a day.

    The road does improve significally though and when we road on to the real 35 about 20kms later I realized that I routed a shortcut straight through some kind of sheep pasture. I guess that comes with the territory when you’re stubborn (stupid) enough to do the routing with a hiking map.
    After another couple of dozen kms the road gets worse again, a lot worse. I find myself acting like a human sonar trying to scan the road for the best track to take with the best buoyancy through the loose material while avoiding the biggest and the sharpest of the big rocks, even though we had brought spare inner tubes along we weren’t in a hurry to use them.

    On top of the fjell the wind had picked up to the point that it was almost getting ridiculous.
    We stopped at an emergency hut and prepared our lunch, the wind was by that time howling so bad I actually felt compelled to look out the window from time to time just to check if the bikes had toppled over.

    We had expected some water crossings on top of the fjell, it was an F-road after all, but due to the last couple of days of “sunshine” (e.g. not rain) the worst we ever came across barely got the Tigers paws wet.
    After riding through the biggest of the puddles and round a corner we almost ran into a giant herd of Icelandic horses herded by some local cowboys. They took up all available road surface as far as the eye could see and it was one of the most majestic sights I have seen in my entire life.
    The cowboys signaled that we should hang back and wait until told to pass and that was definitely a privilege, not a sacrifice.

    They eventually get the horses of the road and let us pass and we ride the rest of the 35 without any major trouble, we stopped at the scene of an accident where a female bicyclist had taken a fall but it seemed all taken care of and to my untrained eye I think it was more psychological than physical damage since the lady was obviously in shock.
    Like the secret agent kind of dry martini we spill out on to the “normal” road 35 and from there on it was all smooth sailing all the way to Gullfoss waterfall. The wind and the dry roads meant that we had ridden most of the day in a biblical dust cloud so by that time I think both we and the bikes really looked the part.

    At least a group of Japanese tourists thought so when they bowed respectfully and asked if they could take pictures of themselves posing with the bike. Here we are by one of the great wonders of the world and they want to take pictures of my bike. I don’t care if they were just being stereotypically Japanese, I still get the bragging rights!

    It is also about this time I reach into the inner pocket of my jacket to get my sunglasses and just get a handful of what seemed more like build-it-yourself shades set, they had simply vibrated to pieces in my pocket.
    I later also learned later that the vibrations had corrupted the memory cards of both GoPros, a real bummer since I would have loved to had the heard of horses on film but then again it’s not a sight I’m ever likely to forget.

    After scoping out Gulfoss which due to its closeness to Reykjavik was really swamped with tourist we ride on to mother of all Geysers, the one that gave name to the whole phenomenon.
    However Geysir is the laid back type of natural phenomenon and very seldom feels the need to show its power, the neighboring “old faithful” on the other hand is more of the easily agitated type and during our visit spat out a cascade of boiling water about every four minutes so even the most impatient got to take a picture.

    Last stop of the day before the hotel is a ride through Tingvellir national park.
    We had intended to visit the site of the first Icelandic Althing, the oldest parliament in the world but the heavens had opened up to a horizontal rain shower so we cut that visit a bit short.
    A pity since it was a fantastic place, everything green and lush and it is also one of the few places in the world where you can see (the Norh American and Eurasian) continental plates drifting apart. It was a powerful sight and I’m really glad we didn’t skip it altogether.

    As we ride all the way through Reykjavik to get to the hotel it is made abundantly clear that I’ve screwed up again. No wonder the hotel was so cheap (~ €70 a night), the distance of 2kms to the city center was to Kopavogur city center, statistically it’s Icelands second biggest town but practically it’s a pretty sad suburb with f**k all to either see or do.
    Turns out
    Lily Guesthouse is great though, free parking right outside the window, breakfast included and both proprietor and staff was helpful and friendly and Reykjavik center is just ten minutes by bus. One of the best mistakes I’ve ever done.

    Where sheep tread Tigers will follow.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    (F)35 proper
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Who would have guessed you’d find such an excellent lunchrestaurant here?
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Some riding shots extracted from corrupt videofiles in the actioncams. Sorry for toasterquality (last two by Bear).
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Gullfoss Waterfall. Domo Arigato!
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Geysir
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Code:
    <iframe width="464px" height="348px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" src="//ilo-static.cdn-one.com/iloapp/gallery/html/embed.html?albumId%3D0%26videoId%3D429%26galleryLocation%3Dgallery%26domainName%3Djensenclan.se%26pUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fdata%2F_gallery%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141781198284444300_thumb.jpg%26nUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141781198284444300_normal.mp4%26mUrl%3D%2F%2Filoapp.jensenclan.se%2Fvideo%2Fpublic%2F0%2F141781198284444300_mobile.mp4"></iframe>
    Tingvellir national park
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #16
  17. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    7.8.2014 Day 8 Reykjavik

    We won’t be riding the bikes today which I must say I don't mind at all. The constant vibrations of yesterday's riding has taken its toll on my arms and shoulders to the point I can hardly raise my arms.
    After breakfast we head for the bus stop. Even though it seems pretty obvious were at the right stop I ask a local and get reassured, yes it’s definitely the right stop but the wrong direction.
    My navigation skills truly are second to none! :D

    After a short bus ride we head straight for the most famous of all Reykvavik landmarks, Halgrimmskirkja church.
    It’s truly a spectacular piece of architecture but the plain sanded concrete interior is a stark contrast to the avant-garde exterior.
    We took the elevator up in the church tower to admire the view and admiring it definitely was.

    Next stop on the must-see list according to my trusty lonely planet guide (I love these guides, I get one for every place I visit) was Reykjavik 871+/-2.
    It’s the site of the first human habitat in Iceland and bears its name simply by the dating with the margin of error being +/- 2 years.
    Of course just a pile of rocks and dirt wouldn’t be all that interesting so they have built a sort of timeline around the whole thing moving forward from the first settlement.

    After that it was time for lunch so we went down to a fish & chip restaurant down at the old harbor and had stonefish with chips. The perks of not riding was of course that we could wash it all down with the local brew.

    Now for a truly bizarre experience, The Icelandic Phallological Museum. Yes you’ve guessed it, it’s a penis-museum.
    It featured all things penile and a variety of organs from animals as small as a mouse up to the blue whale.
    It was a very strange place but it definitely had an entertainment value.

    On our way back to the city center we find ourselves at a tourist information centre and there we see an advertisement for a show called “How to become Icelandic in 60 minutes” which was on for the same night, in just a couple of hours no less.

    Said and done, we walk down to the Harpa concert hall and buy the tickets.
    The building is a tourist attraction in itself, if the design of the Halgrimmskirkja is avant-garde then Harpas design is like walking in one of Salvador Dalis dreams.
    Had the design been any weirder I would have gotten lost walking up the stairs.
    The stairs in question lead up to the sky bar where we spend the rest of the time before the show starts drinking beer.

    The shows “purpose” is to teach you how to become Icelandic in 14 simple lessons and is so filled with stereotypes and prejudices that it’s completely hysterical. I loved it.
    To summarize I learned that in order to become Icelandic you need to always know best, be rude and never express any emotion whatsoever (except on Saturdays when you always get completely wasted).
    Pretty much like being Swedish except for the part where you need to love raw sheep’s testicles in sour milk.
    That's just absurd, we Swedes only eat normal stuff like surströmming (rotten herring) and blodpalt (dumplings filled with blood).

    After the show we grabbed a couple of burgers and headed back to the hotel.

    Halgrimmskirkja
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    871 +/- 2 Settlement exhibition
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Monument for lost seamen at the old harbour
    [​IMG]

    With the fishing industry being more than ¼ of Iceland’s GDP then God help you if you’re looking for cod in all the wrong places.
    [​IMG]

    I love my penis, I do, I love it. If I could kiss it I would. It’s not like I haven’t tried – Barney Stinson
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Harpa concert hall and How to become Icelandic in 60 minutes
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #17
  18. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    8.8.2014 Day 9 Reykjavik

    Today we are going to ride to the Blue Lagoon.
    I know, it’s a tourist trap of astronomical proportions but it still felt like something you should do if you’re on Iceland.

    On the way we stopped by the Seltun geothermal fields and climbed up a ridiculously steep climb to the top.
    The MX-boots offer good protection but these boots are definitely not made for walking, I almost thought I was going to have a heart attack.

    Clambering just the last few steps to the top it’s just like the heavens have been lying in wait for the two stupid Swedes who dares to defy nature and hits us with a torrential rainshower.
    If nothing else it definitely made the vertical descent more interesting.
    Soaked in sweat, drenched by rain and smelling of fart we climb on the bikes and ride on.

    I was expecting a lot of tourists at the blue lagoon but boy, there where loads of them. We got a lot of interested looks by “cooking” our lunch in the parking lot before entering.
    We were greeted by an enormous queue and a cute Icelandic stewardess who explained that the lagoon was “full” and they would only let people in as others left. In the meantime we would be offered complementary tea and coffee and the expected wait time was 45 minutes.
    No problem for me, just keep the black elixir of life flowing and I’ll wait forever and a day.

    The prices on Iceland on everything related to tourism are increasing at an alarming rate, the prices in the lonely planet guide which is just a year old are already off by about 15%. Seems the tourist traps can’t even update their own homepages at the pace the prices are being jacked up since we checked it before we left and it stated an entrance fee of €35 when in fact it was €40 (with an additional €5 to rent a towel for the day).
    So driving through rain to get there just to stand in line for 45 minutes and then pay an extortionate entrance fee… was totally worth it.

    All the aches and pains from rattling around on the F-road just completely disappeared the minute I got in the warm water, I soon found a nice pillow-sized rock to lean my head against and with all the minerals in the water you float like a cork.
    I don’t think it’s possible to be more relaxed and still have a pulse.
    And I got to hand it to them, charging €40 to take a dip in what is in fact efflux water from the Svartsengi power plant might be the best business concept in the world.

    Time to get back on the bikes, we are curious about the old Nato-base so instead of heading back towards Rekjavik we detour to Keflavik.
    I don’t really know what we expected but after a couple of laps where we see nothing but bad asphalt and rundown buildings we quickly decide we’ve had enough of it and head back to the hotel.

    We get changed and head for Reykjavik to get a bite to eat, the proprietor of the hotel had recommended a fish restaurant where they apart from a nice buffet also serve the Icelandic “delicacy” Hakarl along with the famous Icelandic Brennivin, aka black death which we of course where eager to try.

    After an earlier “mishap” in Vietnam I had made a promise to myself to cancel all food and beverage orders that gets a hysterical laughter from the waiter and even though the response wasn’t quite so dramatic this time around the facial expression definitely showed we were making a pretty big mistake, but hey, you only live once!

    Now for those unfamiliar with this culinary phenomenon Hakarl is shark meat that at the time of capture contains so high levels of ammonia that it is poisonous to humans, the Icelanders get around this by leaving the meat to ferment for several month which brings the ammonia level down enough to make it edible, and by edible I really mean non-poisonous.

    The fact that we were pretty much starving (as usual) probably made it better but in any case I wouldn’t say that the taste was the worst of it, the smell was like being slapped in the face.
    It smelled something like a hobo’s woolen sock drenched in urine and to avoid a gagging reflex you really better hold your breath while putting it in your mouth.
    The Brennivin was great though, it was like traditional Swedish schnapps and really took the worst sting out of the sharkmeat.

    It was Friday after all so we decided to get some liquid dessert and ended up at an Irish pub with a cover band playing such traditional Irish gems as Lady Gaga’s Pokerface. I’m sure the pints of Guinness and shots of whisky had nothing to do with the fact that the band seemed to gradually improve both in repertoire and talent.

    I’m sure the beer also had nothing to do with the fact we almost missed the last bus because I decide with minutes to spare that my life depends on whether I get a kebab right this moment or not.
    I do get my life-saving kebab and we do catch the last bus with several seconds to spare.

    Riding to the blue lagoon
    [​IMG]
    Seltun geothermal fields
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Blue lagoon
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The street signs showed we were at the right place but there wasn’t much else to show for this being an old Air base.
    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    9.8.2014 Day 10 Reykjavik

    My head hurts and I feel like shit. In others words exactly as expected.

    At breakfast the proprietor tells us that today is Icelands gay pride parade in Reykjavik and if we want to see it we should get in to town by 2PM.

    We thought, sure, why not? And went to catch a bus. The gay pride thing certainly explains all the rainbow-flags we’d seen all around Reykjavik this weekend.
    However, we weren’t exactly the only ones going in to town today so after missing one bus filled to the brim, the next time around we did a run up and by both tactics and force managed to squeeze ourselves in.

    We got in town in time for lunch and grabbed some Indian food. I thought my mouth was on fire while Bear who has killed of his last taste bud a long time ago thought it was bland.

    The pride parade was as expected pretty hysterical with the grand finale being some kind of schlager-icon dressed in feathers riding a swan with two minions in disco-ball outfits.
    It’s all in a gay’s work I guess.

    We peel of from the spectacle and head for the last of our planned tourist-stops in Reykjavik, the Viking maritime museum.

    Interesting exhibition even though it was focused mainly on the fishing industry and featured very little of any Viking related seamanship.

    We get an early night and head back for the hotel to do some trip planning for the way back towards Seydisfjordur.
    Looking for hotel rooms it’s pretty obvious that the majority of tourists are focused around the south part of Iceland. Rooms are hard to come by at all and with prices for a standard room going for up to €900 (no I did not an extra zero) there’s little hope of finding any cheap accommodation.

    I do eventually find a room at hotel Katla in Hofdabrekka for about €150 a night so that’ll be the destination for tomorrow.

    Reykjavik gay pride parade
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Until today we where oblivious to the gay pride thing but it certainly provided the explanation for stuff like this
    [​IMG]
    Viking maritime museum
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #19
  20. Heimdall

    Heimdall Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    10.8.2014 Day 11 Reykjavik – Vik

    Before leaving Reykjavik behind us altogether we make our first stop of the day at Arbaer Open Air Museum.
    Some of Reykjavik’s oldest buildings are located here, most of them relocated from the city centre and furnished according to the era in which they were inhabited.

    I must admit I mostly wanted to go because of the only building that were originally located here, the turf houses, or hobbit-houses as I call them.
    There’s something about a little hut covered with grass that brings a smile to my face, I think they could charm the shoes off a horse.

    Next stop was one of Bears finds, he had read about a waterfall which you could walk behind and this of course warranted a visit, so to Seljalandsfoss we went.
    A really cool experience and far enough from Reykjavik to not be completely swamped by tourists.

    Next stop is just a quick one at the Eyjafjallajökull visitor centre. Not really worth it though if you don’t want to either pay a ridiculous amount of Kronur just to watch a video or hike 5kms to the volcano itself so we just snap a couple of shots and ride on.

    We ride on to Skogafoss waterfall.
    There is an abundance of waterfalls scattered all over the island so you feel you might not really give them the attention they deserve after a while but they all have their certain perks and charms (this one you could walk along the beach almost to the foot of) so there’s always something to make you glad you didn’t skip it.

    In the same village as Skogafoss lies the Skogar folkmuseum (with more hobbit houses) and on the same ticket you also get admission to the museum of transport.

    Strange fact: the Ford model T is called “gamli ford” in Icelandic which means just “old ford”, I mean it can’t always have been old?

    Next is our final stop for the day which is an old US Navy C47 transport plane wreck which crash-landed on the beach at Solheimsandur, I naively thought I had made a real find when I researched this but with three quarters of a million tourists a year I guess there aren’t really any “unknown” places left to be explored.

    It was also a lot closer to the ring road than I thought which of course helps when Mr & Mrs Moron venture completely offroad in their rented Hyundai i30, my god the suffering and damages these poor rentals must go through in a lifetime.
    There really only are two types of rentals on Iceland, it’s either the golf-style minis or the full on snorkel-fitted Dakar racers. There's absolutely nothing in between and there are a lot of them, it’s obvious by the approving looks you get from the locals that always go straight to the back to look at your plates that you gain a few plus-points from the dedication of hauling your own vehicle with you.

    But that’s a bit of a side-track, the plane wreck was situated at a completely black beach which added plenty to the dramatic effect and even though we weren’t the only ones we got a few cool shots.
    That’s all we had planned for today and from Solheimsandur it’s just a short ride to the hotel in Vik which is lucky because the weathergods had once again decided it was time for us to take a shower.

    The Katla hotel was a bit of a strange find, the facilities where great and the service was good but I never really understood why the staff all spoke French with each other and the restaurant menu was a bit lacking. The two choices available was either a sandwich or the buffet (at €38) so we took the sting to our respective wallets and got the buffet which actually was very good.

    After dinner we got an early night since the next day we were going to ride about 500kms back to Seydisfjördur. We had booked a guesthouse there for the last three nights since that was the only reasonably priced accommodation to be found on this part of the Island.

    Arbaer Open Air Museum
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Seljalandsfoss Waterfall
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Eyjafjallajökull, the white and brown dots scattered on the grassy slope is actually horses and not as I first thought sheep.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Skogafoss Waterfall
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Skogar folk and transport museum
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Solheimsandur, C47 wreckage
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #20