Ideas to repair a Leaky shipping container roof

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by overlandr, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

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    Scrape, soda blast the rust? Then apply bedliner?
    #21
  2. t6pilot

    t6pilot Been here awhile

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    Cold roofing patch, here in the USA big box stores sell it in 5 gal containers, get the silver stuff should last at least 5 years. Apply with trowel sticks to anything
    #22
  3. redprimo

    redprimo Been here awhile

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    How about some peal and stick rubberized roof flashing. I get some at the local box store that is 10" wide. if the sustrate is clean and you don't streatch it when you apply it, it sticks very well and its supper easy to use.
    #23
  4. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

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    Yes the roofing idea with glass is great but just to remind folks, it'll have another container on top so no light and no space for the wooden structure but it will get plenty of water graining down from the container above when it rains and little sun to evaporate the standing water afterwards

    Thanks for all the responses. I have already though of an old enamellled washing machine or cooker as being a good source of steel plate. I'm having to use the metal plate to reinforce the already very weak steel roof which has rusted badly over about 3'x1' and is thus weak. I'm leaning towards a very thin (watery NOT gel) acid type rust converter which will soak into all the cracks and crevices and stop further rust. Keep the ideas coming.
    #24
  5. ontic

    ontic

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    Sorry to talk about welding, but the thing is made of steel. A hot welded steel patch will be the best and cheapest and easiest cure. Anything else just seems silly.
    Are you actually in Sydney? I go to metal recyclers in Melbourne and I get steel for free- fancier metals I pay per weight but even if you have to buy some steel from a scrap yard it will be the fraction of the cost of one tube of Sika. A cheap little modern inverter stick welder like numerous people you must know could lend you will deal fine with a long extension cord.

    Get an oversize sheet- lay it down and draw around it in a marker- wire wheel an inch or two clean all around where you have marked, lay the patch back down and weld the patch on. Including sourcing steel it would half a day max. Done.

    If it is about doing it as cheap and dodgy and lazy as possible... many ways I suppose. Got any old paint tins lying around? Weathershield or a similar vinyl type acrylic would work well. Block up the pin holes with anything that will stop the paint running through. On a hot day get a $2 roller and paint multiple layers of paint over the whole suspect area making sure to go up beyond the area the water will pool. Put half at least half a dozen layers of thick rubbery weathershield paint and it doesn't matter what happens underneath it, the membrane on top will hold for years, even with water pooled on top.

    But again, it seems silly not to weld it.
    #25
  6. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    Concours has the right answer IMHO.

    I personally wouldn't weld it as it is non structural and the only thing you will do is burn off any corrosion protection already applied to the steel.

    Also, if you are putting another container on top of it you might not even bother with doing anything.
    #26
  7. gunnabuild1

    gunnabuild1 Been here awhile

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    Patch and sikaflex, if you use a rust converter and patch it bigger than the weakened spot once the other container is on top it will be a decade before you even have to think about it.Sikaflex is the Chuck Norris of sealants, if you ever want to take something apart DONT use Sika.
    #27
  8. BigToad

    BigToad The Bone Destroyer

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    I would just clean it up, wet it out with epoxy, lay on some 12 oz cloth, wet it out again and your done, if required another coat 12 to 24 hours later, Thats what I have done on my container here on the wet coast and its worked for many years.

    I try to make my container look like crap so no one thinks there is anything of value in it.
    #28
  9. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

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    Thanks but they are not pinholes - big buggers that can easily get bigger with some gentle prodding!

    From my first post: "From inside I noticed a single rusty blister 2" OD with evidence of a small leak below. On the outside of this area, there is an area about 2' x 1' with severe rust. By this I mean multiple thin layers of steel rusting come off when nudged by a screwdriver. I created two small holes (1" sq) easily so then stopped. The container steel is about 0.125" thick - maybe more. I only need to keep the container for another couple of years or so welding is uneconomic. "
    #29
  10. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    If the roof is "falling apart in several places" instead of "just a few holes here and there" I'd seriously consider covering the roof with sheet metal, especially if you can score some old corrugated panels from somewhere. If you are seriously considering stacking another container on top might just want to do that instead of all this fiddling. Then any future water leaks I'd suggest dealing with from inside and just use cheap caulk.
    #30
  11. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

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    Resolution at hand, I ended up selling this rust bucket for more than I paid for it and replaced it with younger 40' high cube with no major rust issues.
    #31
  12. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    Good choice.
    [​IMG]
    #32