In memory of Jim Adams - an R60/5 build diary

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by backdrifter, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    As has been the way with this project, it has been one step forward, two steps backward lately. I won't go into the details, but I found a wobble in the front wheel once mounted. As it turns out, this was due to a damaged hub caused by having the bearing races pressed out without being warmed up first. If you're bored, you can read more about this saga in the help thread that I started here:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=842732

    Thanks to all who helped over there, I think I'm on my way again. So, the plan is to use some Loctite 680 or Permatex Bearing Mount for Relaxed Fit to essentially bond the races into place. I couldn't find the stuff locally, so I bought what I needed online and should have it in the next week or so. Here's the wheel all apart:

    [​IMG]

    And here you can see some of the damage to the hub bore:

    [​IMG]

    Since the bearing races will be glued in place and even more difficult to remove than BMW designed them to be, I figured it was a great time to go ahead and modify the bearing stack spacer so that it will fit through the outer bearing race. This is done by grinding down the two little ridges on the spacer. I did this by turning them against a grinder. You can see the right ridge has been ground down here, but I hadn't started on the left yet.

    [​IMG]

    And here they are both done, with proof that the spacer now fits through the bearing race.

    [​IMG]

    Then I had to clean up the bearing races, the large hub spacer that spaces the outer races, and the hub bore itself. These parts will need to be clean and free of grease for the Loctite compound to work.

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    Clean and grease free. It's a shame that I had to waste that much brand new grease, but again, that's kind of been the way with this project!

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    I put the grease free wheel parts in one bag and the greased wheel parts in another and called it a day.

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    I'm going to disassemble the rear wheel again and be sure the hub is OK. I don't feel any movement when it's all torqued down to spec, so I suspect the rear wheel is fine, but I want to be sure. I also want to go ahead and modify the rear hub spacer as well to make adding grease and future preload adjustments (swapping out the wedding band or adding shims) that much easier. A pain, but I already needed to remove the rear wheel to clean up the exorbinant amount of grease I put on the final drive splines.
  2. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    Happy Thanksgiving Eve, all!

    I felt restless tonight and wanted to get something accomplished, no matter how small. Remember the "R60/5" badges? I had painted them and baked them in the oven, but I hadn't decided whether or not I was going to sand the high spots off of the top to make the lettering and borders stand out again (as the stock ones do). I decided I definitely needed to do that, so I got to it.

    Before:

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    After paint:

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    And now, after I sanded them.

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    I'm really happy with how they turned out. This certainly isn't anything that will help me get the bike started sooner, but every little bit needs to be finished and I find I can sleep better each night knowing I did something on the bike! :D

    Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!
  3. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked

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    It's the cat's meow, the bees knees, the icing on the cake! Nicely done!
  4. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    Thanks Big Bamboo!

    Well, Happy Thanksgiving all! I wanted to get something done today. Unfortunately, I think the clutch and rear main seal is out of the question. I need to go to my father-in-law's house to borrow his air tools to remove the clutch bolts, and I didn't have the heart to ask him to help today since he's hosting a huge Thanksgiving. Hopefully in the next couple of days. So instead I decided to swap out the front crank and cam seals.

    I went this method to get the old crank seal out:

    [​IMG]

    Ugly, but effective, and it didn't cause any damage to the bore.

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    My wife had to laugh about how we were spending time together on Thanksgiving. My wife and daughter were baking and making Santa Hats out of stawberries and marshmellows while I was working on the BMW. Side by side in the kitchen. It smelled like wonderful treats and 15 year old motor oil!

    [​IMG]

    Believe it or not, she's as interested in the BMW as she is the baking!

    [​IMG].

    OK, back to business. Must not let such mundane things as my family get in my way! :D (kidding, of course!) Started cleaning off the old gasket. Hate it, but it's gotta be done.

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    Both seals out. The cam seal pushed out easily with my thumb.

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    I soaked all the seals in oil to soften them up a bit:

    [​IMG]

    The crank seal is in place here, and I'm getting ready to install the cam seal.

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    And the points plate reinstalled and fresh new crank and cam seals done. Easy, and again, I feel a sense of accomplishment for the day!

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    Happy Thanksgiving!
  5. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    I can't believe Thanksgiving was the last time I updated this thread!

    Well, I know I've said it so many times that no one is even listening anymore, but after many trial and tribulations, I finally truely have a rolling chassis! :D

    As you may have seen (I started a separate thread for help), I had a tick in the front bearing when it was all assembled last time. Long story short, the bore of the front hub was damaged/enlarged when I had the old bearing races removed, and the new ones didn't fit tightly enough. After many suggestions, I decided to go this route:

    [​IMG]

    It is Permatex Bearing Mount for Relaxed Fits, and bonds metals with gaps up to 15 thousandths. I cleaned everything up, mounted the races again, this time coated with the Permatex, and let it sit for a day. Went out the next day, 24 hours later, and tried to spin the outer race with my hand. It was tough, but I was able to move it. Damn, a failure.

    I spoke with my buddy that used to work at Loctite and he suggested that I may need a primer to make the aluminum "active", which would help the bonding significantly. I still may go that route, but instead I decided to try a combination of suggestions that I had received, and I added some shims in between the bore and the bearing race and also applied the permatex. I didn't have any shimstock, so I cut up some feeler gauges that I had lying around. The shims looked like this (I still have these because .008" was too large - I ended up using .006" shims and it was a perfect, very tight fit):

    [​IMG]

    Shimmed and Permatexed:

    [​IMG]

    I added a black mark with permanent marker on the bearing race and the outside of the hub. I'll keep an eye on this and make sure that the bearing race doesn't spin in the hub. If it does, I'll go back to the start and try another solution.

    [​IMG]

    I let it sit for another 24 hours and mounted it up this morning. Mounted back up and ready to go:

    [​IMG]

    And the other side:

    [​IMG]

    I shook the tire and felt for any play - there was none what-so-ever. Confident, I went ahead and torqued the axle nut and clamp nut to spec.

    Then removed the rear wheel and removed 99% of the grease that I had put on the final drive splines (thanks, Big Bamboo, for the advice!), and then reassembled the rear wheel. then I torqued the rear axle and clamp nut to spec.

    [​IMG]

    As far as I'm concerned, this will be the last time for a while I mess with the wheels/tires. I think they're all set up, and now it's time to turn my attention to the engine.

    I think I've said this way too many times too, but I *should* finally get to the clutch and rear main seal tomorrow. Here's to hoping! :freaky

    In the mean-time, I decided to go ahead and clean up this part of the engine (not sure what you'd call it - the alternator cover?):

    [​IMG]

    I've noticed this on lots of other /5's - this piece of the engine always looks worse than the rest. I used my tried-and-true method of the stainless steel brush attachment and my drill, but it definitely did not clean up as well as the other parts I've done. Can anyone tell me why? Is this aluminum piece a different grade than the others? It certainly seems to oxidize more. Anyway, it did clean up, and I don't think I will be able to tell the difference between it and the rest of the engine once I apply the Rub 'N Buff.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That was about it. I also cleaned up the clutch and break levers, but no photos yet. I still need to remove the clutch and front break perches and sand and paint them. I probalby should've powdercoated them, and may still in the future, but for now paint will have to do.

    I was going to start adding some of the the auxilliary equipment - coils, voltage regulator, starter relay, etc, but it just would have been busy work and I figured some of that stuff might make it more difficult to get the engine back in the frame, which I hope very much to be attempting in the near future.

    Hopefully more tomorrow! :clap
  6. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    Back at it today as promised. I rolled the engine over to the workbench and got busy.

    [​IMG]

    Removed three clutch bolts and screwed the longer, 2" bolts with spacers in for removing the tension from the spring plate:

    [​IMG]

    All this time, the thing I was missing was an impact driver to remove the clutch bolts. I had tried it with a breaker bar and almost stripped one of the clutch bolts out, so I quit. I had been waiting for a good time to load everythriing up and head to my father-in-law's house to use his air tank and tools. Then my brother-in-law told me he had a batter powered impact driver that I could borrow. That sounded much easier than moving everything across town, so here it is:

    [​IMG]

    And it worked damn well too. Everything was going splendidly until I stripped this clutch bolt out - probably the same one I started to strip with the breaker bar.

    [​IMG]

    I worked on it for probably 20 or 30 minutes. I thought about drilling it out, but wanted to try other methods first. I've had good luck with hammering a 1mm larger star wrench head into stripped allen bolts, so that's what I did. It took many tries - hammer the star head in, hit it with the impact. Repeat. Again, and again, and again! It finally gave though. Here it is, the little bolt that could:

    [​IMG]

    I slowly backed the long bolts off and the pressure ring, spacers, diaphragm spring, and pressure plate came off easily.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    My first peak at the flywheel:

    [​IMG]

    I used Papa's old license plate to hold the flywheel in place while I removed the bolts.

    [​IMG]

    The bolts came off easily, but the flywheel wouldn't budge once the bolts were out. I ended up having to run to Lowe's to buy some angle iron, which I mounted like this to pull the flywheel out:

    [​IMG]

    Worked like a charm.

    [​IMG]

    I love the radial oil tracks proving that the bike had a leaking main seal (as if I needed further proof - the crud above the rear motor mount had already told the story!). You can see the crud at the bottom of this picture:

    [​IMG]

    It doesn't look great here, but after a few shots of engine degreaser and some light wiping, it looked much, much better.

    [​IMG]

    Next onto the oil pump seal. The cover came off without problems.

    [​IMG]

    New seal about to go in.

    [​IMG]

    Somehow I got lazy and missed photographing a few steps. Probably because I'm so spooked by installing the rear main seal. All of the horror stories have me worried. It seemed easy enough, and I measured every way that I knew how and the seal seems to be in squarely and seated in the same position as the one that I took out (which was leaking, so it may not have been a great reference!).

    [​IMG]

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    I had planned to reassemble everything, but when I pulled out my new flywheel bolts I saw that I had received the wrong ones:

    [​IMG]

    Old one on the right, new on the left. I'll return them to the shop and exchange them for the right ones in a few days, and then start reassembling the engine. Besides installing the engine, this was the last large mechanical thing I planned to do on the project. :clap
  7. fosterb

    fosterb Adventurer

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    Dec 8, 2011
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    28
    Dude, don't think that no-one is reading your thread, I love it! You're doing great work and the bike looks fantastic! Congrats mate and keep up the good work!
  8. bmwblake

    bmwblake upside down parker

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    nashville, tn
    the engine part you're talking about that does ever get as clean is the timing cover. i've had the same experience.

    your leaking rear main looks very familiar. :D

    [​IMG]
  9. georgesgiralt

    georgesgiralt Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    141
    Hello !
    I *do* hope that you have blocked the crankshaft *before* removing the flywheel !
    If not do it now ! You risk the bearing going out of the locating pins....
    Otherwise I enjoy very much your restoration saga ! Even the pictures are awesome !
  10. bmwblake

    bmwblake upside down parker

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    i think that's what he has going on in this picture.

    [​IMG]

    looks to me like he has something under the front cover to keep the crank in place.

  11. Rapid Dog

    Rapid Dog bikes, booze, broads...

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    ...you are doing a very nice job. Once all that greasy stuff is over, the rewarding part begins...:norton
  12. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    fosterb: Thanks for the comments! I enjoy doing the build diary and it's been a great help to me, but I must admit that I enjoy getting responses!

    bmwblake: Man, you're not kidding that yours looks familiar. I had to look twice before I realized that that was your photo. I thought you had just replied to one of my photos at first! Actually, I think yours looked a bit worse than mine!

    georgesgirlat: Thanks for the comments, and for the friendly reminder! I did indeed block the crank, and as bmwblake suggested, that's what I was trying to show with the first photo. Thanks for the warning though - I'm always grateful for help that could save me from doing something really stupid!

    rapid dog: Thanks to you too! I've enjoyed the greasy wrenching aspect of the project, but I'm ready to move on. I can't wait to see the engine in the frame again. I can't even tell you how great I'll feel the day that I finally get to see all of the freshly painted body work mounted on the bike again! Getting closer now!

    Really, thanks for all the kind words guys, it really means a lot to me.

    I'm stopping by the shop tomorrow to exchange the flywheel bolts for the correct ones, so I should be on the move again soon.
  13. Grayghost66

    Grayghost66 Been here awhile

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    213
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    Toronto, Ontario
    Great thread!!!! Keep going and posting the pictures. All the best for the holidays!:clap
  14. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    Thanks, Grayghost, and Happy Holidays to you and yours too!

    I'm still waiting on new flywheel bolts to arrive. In the mean-time, I received some cheap headlight mounts that I ordered. For $15, I figured I'd give them a shot. I'd really like to go with the stock headlight mounts since they turned out so well (photo below), but I hate to cut them up to accommodate the billet top triple. On the other hand, there's probably no reason not to, as I don't plan to ever mount the stock top triple clamp again. What do you guys think? Here's the stockers, painted and gorgeous:

    [​IMG]

    And a few photos with the cheapos on. I don't like the way they look as much, but I do like where they hold the headlight (quite a bit lower and a it closer to the bars than the stock ones did):

    [​IMG]

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    Sorry some of the pictures are blurry - it was getting dark and I didn't have a fast lens on the camera.

    The headlight sits lower enough that I wasn't sure if I'd be able to see the gauges over the bars, but I gave it the old sit test and I coudl read it all. Adding the seat will mean I sit even higher and should be able to see them no problem. I like the way the lower edge of the gauge bezel fits snuggly against the top triple clamp. What do you guys think?
  15. assquatch20

    assquatch20 Hoss Cat

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    Alpine, TN
    The tidier look is nice. I'd go on with the cheap ones. Try to keep the originals, uh, original. Some purist might appreciate it when you're cleaning out the garage someday.
  16. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I've seen the after market brackets you have in person. I thought they looked not right. I prefer the OEM brackets. I don't have a problem with cutting the brackets to fit the upper triple. There's not a shortage of brackets. We probably have more brackets than we need.
  17. enzorover

    enzorover Adventurer

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    I definitely say go with the cheapo's. Is the paint flat? If so, get them powder coated like everything else. Or maybe chrome or silver like the forks?
  18. backdrifter

    backdrifter Wannabe rider

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    Thanks for the input, gents. For now, I'm going to leave the cheapos on. I can always decide to cut and use stock mounts later if I want. I do like the position the cheapos hold the headlight in more than the stock mounts.

    Enzo: Yes, flat black paint. I agree that they would look better shiny. The way they mount together includes a slip-fit on one end though, and I think powder coat would be a bad idea. They offer chrome or silver ones as well, and I specifically wanted black to match the headlight bucket. Maybe I'll end up painting them with the same black paint I used to paint the engine badges. For now though, I have bigger battles so they'll stay like they are!
  19. Packer

    Packer Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Scotland, wonderful biking when it's dry (rarely)
    Good to see the report going live again.

    Another vote for modding the stock mounts.

    Keep up the good work.
  20. jocce

    jocce Adventurer

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    Holy smoke, it just look fantastic :clap