Interesting new tire tool.

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Stumpalump, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    22,978
    Location:
    Masshole
  2. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,200
    Location:
    Central PA
    I changed my second tire with the tool... This time the 21" inch front.
    I have a Cycle Hill and I use it to demount the tire and hold the tire, but this tool is the cats ass when you put the tire back on.
  3. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    I've mounted 8-9 so far, did a 120/70-17 for the SV last week while on vacation. All the others have been tube type. A little lube on the bead and "go slow and gentle" works wonders. I have both wheels on the DRZ to do today.
  4. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    DRZ got 2 new knobbies, about 1:40 with just the tools in the oem tool kit, a valve stem snake, my Trailstand and the tyre tool. On vacation away from home so did it in the yard on a piece of cardboard. The tyre tool is really handy for pushing the first bead over the rim which is always a pita with irons, and the second bead goes on so easy peasy. I did use a little lube but wouldn't have needed it on the trail.
  5. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,970
    Location:
    Chandler, AZ
    I can't believe all the crazy ideas people come up with for changing motorcycle tires. I have changed hundreds of tires, including large cruiser tires, and all I have ever used were a couple of 10" tire irons (mine are now 30+ years old) a JC Whitney bead breaker for tubeless tires, and plenty of WD-40 for lubricant. Just remember to wash it off before using the tire. I have never had any problems doing it that way. And I have done it at home, beside the road, and on the trail. If you can't do it this way, you are doing something wrong.
  6. mitch96

    mitch96 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    140
    Location:
    Hollyweird Florida
    I have changed hundreds of tires, I have never had any problems doing it that way. And I have done it at home, beside the road, and on the trail. If you can't do it this way, you are doing something wrong.[/QUOTE]

    Bully bully, good for you!

    I, for one, am not that talented............
  7. OsoADV

    OsoADV Oso

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,363
    Location:
    USA
    You can also split wood with an axe instead of log splitter quite successfully, repeatedly, and reliably. So what? Stop innovating and creating easier, faster, and/or more efficient ways to do things?
  8. JustRon

    JustRon ex-broadwayron

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,431
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    I tried it for the first time today on a trifecta of difficult tires...
    1) Motoz tire (very stiff sidewall)
    2) Heavy duty tube
    3) Rim lock
    4) (bonus) I'm lousy at changing tires

    My axle was much bigger than the adapter I got with the tool. I think I ordered the biggest, but can't remember. It wasn't a dealbreaker, but it did put the tool at it's longest reach on the 21" rim. If it were the correct size, It would have worked better. I'll say this... this tool is like magic! Getting the tire to what I call the "starting point" (one bead outside the rim, and one bead inside... some people can get to this spot in 2 minutes using only their hands. It took me almost an hour to get here.) Now, the difficult part (and, where the tool comes into play)- getting that other bead seated. Wow... seriously, it took maybe 5-8 minutes. I did use a Motion Pro Bead Buddy (out of habit), but I'm not sure it was necessary.
    I'm very impressed. If someone made this out of alloy, I bet it would sell even better, because folks would take it on the road. Not that it's incredibly heavy, but surely not designed for travel. Anyway, great product!:thumb
  9. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    Just Ron, I've done a few 21's, tube type and tubeless, and the tool should have plenty of reach. Make sure you have the tool inserted all the way into the hub. If you have your wheel laying flat on the work surface, the rod that goes thru the hub will contact the table, or whatever, and not go far enough into the hub, effectively reducing the reach of the arm. If I'm changing a tire outside of my shop, I lay the wheel / tire I'm working with on top of the tire I just replaced, so that the rod goes all the way thru. This will give you plenty of reach with the "pusher"

    Also, the pusher needs to be "sort of" parallel with the ground which makes it less likely to scratch your rim. If it is pushing down, rather than straight out, you can cause more damage.
  10. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    I just went back and looked, you ordered the tool with the 17 mm adapter. The tool is 20 mm and there was a sleeve to shim that to 25 mm. The 17 mm would be for a smaller bike like a DRZ or XR650L. If you had a XR650R you would use the tool without any sleeve or adapter because it would have a 20 mm axle. You have a bike that has an axle bigger than 25 mm?

    The optional adapter you ordered is for a SMALLER axle (17mm). The tool itself will do 20 and 25, and basically any size in between (with a little slop).

    If you did have an axle bigger than 25, it shouldn't be too hard to shim the 25 with some thin aluminum, aluminum tape, duct tape, etc.. Post up a pic of the tool put together.
  11. JustRon

    JustRon ex-broadwayron

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,431
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    I bought the 17mm for a different bike (can't even remember which one, I might have sold it by now, haha). Yeah, my front axle is much bigger than 25mm, based on the amount of extra space. I could have shimmed it, and would have if I thought I needed to. But, it worked like that. I had the wheel on wood blocks, maybe 2 inches thick (what I normally use to change tires). I understand what you mean about the angle of the pusher and it's reach. Maybe my "review" came off wrong, but I thought it worked great. I don't really feel the need to make any adjustments. I'm still shocked at how much time (and energy) the tool saved me.
  12. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    OK, good. Whatever slop you have between the tool and the hub, you will lose in the reach of the pusher. Too much slop and the tool pusher won't be long enough for sure.
  13. RoadRdr

    RoadRdr Mostly Pavement

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    474
    Location:
    South Jersey - there's a difference
    I have the tool and the stand I plan to use for the fairly small training motorcycles but it didn't occur to me until I was looking at my rear tire on my BMW GSA with the large center hole... I don't know how i can use this tool on my beemer.

    Has anyone that bought the tool used it on the rear wheel of a BMW?

    I don't have access to be able to weld or machine any kind of adapter.
  14. kentnothstine

    kentnothstine Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    615
    Location:
    Traverse City, MI, USA
    I think I saw somebody make an adapter out of PVC pipe
  15. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,847
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL / Sylva, NC
    Whatever you use for a shim doesn't have to be metal or be permanently attached to the tool. Put up a pic of your hub, I've never ridden a BMW, or paid any attention to what the hub looks like.
  16. OsoADV

    OsoADV Oso

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,363
    Location:
    USA
  17. RoadRdr

    RoadRdr Mostly Pavement

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    474
    Location:
    South Jersey - there's a difference
  18. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,118
    Location:
    Cin City, OH
    Have had the tool for a couple of months, and finally got to use it last week. Two new Shinko 244's with tubes on my XT225, and a flat tube replacement on my W650.

    With lube and tires irons, removal was the usual PIA, same for breaking the beads. Had to put a piece of board on the tire and run over it with my car to break the bead.

    Installation was a breeze though, much easier than usual. The W rear tire had a really stiff sidewall, but pushing the opposite side down into the rim allowed the tool to do its work very nicely.

    I worked on 2 pieces of 2x6 to protect the front disc and rear sprocket, this also allowed the tool to drop all the way down. The design of the tool pretty much eliminates pinching a tube. Once I got one side back on, I inserted the tube, partially inflated it, and bounced the whole wheel/tire assembly on the ground a number of times to loosen any tube folds, I do the same when both sides are on before full inflation.

    When I first bought the tool I agonized a little over the price, but I'm now convinced it was money well spent. In my mid 60's, this gives me the extra edge I need to keep doing my own tire changes.
  19. JustRon

    JustRon ex-broadwayron

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,431
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    I changed my rear tire last wknd, and the tool fit my axle perfectly (no shim needed, like for my front). I had to show someone at my garage how easy it is, because it really looks like magic... took less than 2 minutes to seat the bead.*

    *It should be noted that it took me over an hour to get to the starting point- one bead inside the rim, and one bead outside. I've seen people do this online using their hands, and it takes 30 seconds. I had soap on the bead and was using all my body weight (jumping on the thing!), spoons, whatever. It actually took 2 of us using a freaking No-Mar Changer just to get one bead over the rim! The sidewall is ridiculously stiff (Motoz Tractionator)- I could probably ride with 3 psi if I wanted. My friend couldn't believe I wanted to remove the tire from the No-Mar to finish the job, but when he saw how fast it was, he was shocked. I just need to figure out how to get started... the easy part of changing a tire.
  20. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,118
    Location:
    Cin City, OH
    I used the tool to put the first bead on also, worked fine. Did you try it?