Introduction, hear my plan?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by tlmaffucci, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. tlmaffucci

    tlmaffucci Been here awhile

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    Hello all, I'm 18 from NC. Near the blue ride parkway for those not from around here. I'm new to the forum but have used it extensively in deciding what bike to get.

    I'm going to purchase a Suzuki DR650 2013 new. It's on sale at a dealership near me so the opportunity was there for a brand new one and I am going to take it. I was dead set on the KLR 650 for a while but after long research this is what I have decided. I still love the KLR but I've decided it's not best for me.

    I plan on using this as my main commuter to school and work as well as going up to friends colleges in Boone where I will enjoy some good off-roading with my buddies. One major factor in choosing the 650 over a 400 or less is that I plan on going on cross country trips as well as trips down to South/central america (as well as Canada and Alaska). Basically everywhere on this West hemisphere (west, right?).

    Well just thought I would introduce myself and let y'all know what's up with me. Thanks for the information found on this site! It has helped so much.
    #1
  2. cognugget

    cognugget n00b

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    Sounds fun! Any reason a 18 y/o needs a brand new bike?
    #2
  3. sintax

    sintax Been here awhile

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    the DR650 is just about the perfect KISS bike. I say your plan is perfect.

    Only major downfall of the DR650 is its weight and suspension. There are solutions to all problems. Get some miles under your belt and enjoy the world.
    #3
  4. acesandeights

    acesandeights Asperger

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    Perfect plan, absolutely perfect.
    #4
  5. thumpthumpthump

    thumpthumpthump Thumpthumpthump

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    I live near Boone and know all the gravel roads let me know if you are in the area. thumpthump
    #5
  6. tlmaffucci

    tlmaffucci Been here awhile

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    Well at first it was just because I wanted it and because there is one on sale at a dealership near me. Until I read your post. Now I don't mind getting one that is slightly used, I would like one with less than 3,000 miles. The thing is, I can't find one. I live in Statesville, NC and am willing to drive around 100~ miles to get one but I can't find one. It's a problem.
    #6
  7. tlmaffucci

    tlmaffucci Been here awhile

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    Yeah man absolutely.
    #7
  8. Gleado

    Gleado Adventurer

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    Location:
    albuquerque, nm
    as you'll spend nearly all your time riding and not wrenching. I too, was set on a KLR but after riding them side by side I liked the DR-so I came home with it. Mine is a '98 and had 9400 miles on it. Now it has 18k and still runs as good as the day I got it. Point is, don't get hung up on the 3k miles thing. Taken care of they will last past 50-75k miles before you have to do anything major-at least according to the guys on the forums that own them. I did not research before-hand, just lucked out and got the one with the best, simplest, most reliable old school motor on the planet. My plan is to see how long it will go. I rode the beemers and didn't like them, and the KTM reliability is suspect in my mind at the moment but I haven't researched enough on them. Fact is, I'm happy. I would make a recommendation to you though, young fella and I hope you never forget this-if you're riding on the street or highway never stop watching the vehicles around you as they will often not see you. Always leave yourself a way out and stay out of the blindspot. I see guys dying all the time because they don't know what I just told you. I believe it has to due with what I'd call the human autopilot mode. People driving around in cages are looking out for cars, not motorcycles. Trust me on this and never forget it. I'm 51 and have been riding the street since I was 13. When I started, an experienced rider told me what I just told you(45 minute oration actually)-it has made the difference many times over the years. Now get the bike and go have fun!
    #8
  9. tlmaffucci

    tlmaffucci Been here awhile

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    I really appreciate your experience, i'll be careful and pay attention.

    Reminds me of what mad eye moody said, "Constant Vigilance"
    #9
  10. hennikerjd

    hennikerjd I am Jack's wasted life

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    Back in NH riding season roughly coincides with the return of the blue hairs from FL and other points south. Those old ladies will look DIRECTLY at you and still pull out right in front of you! :eek1

    Basically you just had to assume that any large american car you saw was probably piloted by a murderous senior citizen whose intent was to send you to the great beyond ahead of them.

    Nowadays you have to add people texting, trying to figure out navigation systems, putting on makeup, etc to that list. They're all trying to kill you, don't trust any of 'em!

    You've got a great plan though and have picked out a fine bike - just about as simple and reliable as it gets.
    #10
  11. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    WELCOME!

    I highly recommend a BRC, educational reading, and good armored riding gear.

    Classes/reading may not cover this, but Mad-Eye did...constant vigilance is key, 360-degrees. Keep your head and eyes moving, whether stopped or rolling down the interstate. Use good mirrors and your peripheral vision. Use lateral motion, positioning, and bright/contrasting colors too.

    SEE and BE SEEN.

    Riding dirt can also make you a better rider if you're always trying to learn.

    Also check out the "fixes" on the DR650 wikia webpage. There is a lot of info around regarding the big DR.
    #11