Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. BMW Kurt

    BMW Kurt Bluesman

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    Dayum! That would need a TVIP!!!
  2. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    Nice report on that route Sjoerd. That would complement the Durango to Jesus Maria route discussed earlier. Wow that area is awesome.
  3. SkizzMan

    SkizzMan There, that's it

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    Will confirm soon.
  4. MikeS

    MikeS For sure let's do it

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    Rode it twice a few weeks ago on a F650 thumper. There are steep sections, ruts and such. No polvo to speak of. There was a grader crew on the Bato side the first time through. Good ride for a 650cc or lighter!
  5. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

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    +1 You could also write a letter to Agente Investigador de la Polcia Ministerial in the BCS Attorney General's office. Not totally sure this is the correct venue, but there is an Email/contact option here: http://www.bcs.gob.mx/tramites-y-se...te-investigador-de-la-polcia-ministerial.html

    The last thing the Estado wants is cops shaking down tourists. You may never get justice, but if you shake the policia municipale up via the folks higher up on the food chain, we might not have them trying this kind of thing to the next gringo that comes along.
  6. SkizzMan

    SkizzMan There, that's it

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    Had the good fortune of riding a steep section just after a D6 with a ripper had it's way with it. Good to hear it's hard-pack now. Beautiful route.
  7. pilot815

    pilot815 Long timer

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    My dad has been involved in Mexican Business for 30+ years. He is always commenting on how things have improved. Customs was a PITA a few years back. Now, it really isn't that bad.

    A few months back he was taking a memory foam mattress home and stopped to declare it at customs. It was a little over $300 so he had to pay taxes on it. He opened the cover on his pickup so the customs agent could see it. It was still in its packaging and rolled up nice and tight. The customs agent looked at it and informed my dad that camping gear was not taxable and told him to have a nice day and a safe trip. He was shocked that it was just that easy. After all, it was a regular mattress not a camping one.

    There are still officials out there that want more than they are entitled to, but it is much better. A couple years ago, we were stopped by a Federale. My dad handed him his temporary TX drivers license. The officer looked at it, and wished us a nice day. He knew there was no point trying to get a bribe since it was a temp license. I have been known to travel in Mexico with 2-3 regular/temp licenses for just this reason. :deal
  8. SkizzMan

    SkizzMan There, that's it

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  9. alpiner84

    alpiner84 Been here awhile

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    Easily the best advice I was given on this thread before my trip: bring licenses you don't care about. To that end, I carried two AAA International Licenses (crappy little paper booklets), then my real license (which was kept in a hidden pocket and never emerged). I never paid a single bribe or fine in 10,000 miles. I was pulled over three times, for two of which I legitimately broke the law, and then there were the innumerable checkpoints. There was only a mild amount of smiling/sweet talking/playing dumb. But mostly, I think it was those crappy paper licenses that no one in their right mind would consider valuable. HUGE thanks to that bit of thread-advice!
  10. mark883

    mark883 and the mysterians

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    I think you might have an advantage on the smiling/sweet talking part, compared to 98% of the participants in this thread.

    I guess us 98%ers get to play dumb.



    Tho I do remember a couple female cops where abduction could be a legitimate option and suitable punishment....:evil

    Tip: TricePiloto's Mexican License Bureau
  11. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Here's a valuable little secret: It isn't always having the disposability of a fake state license or using an international drivers license that gets you out of a mordida bite.

    Your legitimate, valid state license can always work if you don't have a fake.

    Its all in how you role play your perceived willingness to part with what you have thats the key. If you're anywhere near good at this, you'll get your "license" handed back to you on the spot.

    But you have to appear cool, calm, and most of all, determined.
  12. Sporting Wood

    Sporting Wood I

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    Only happened to me once in 8 years of riding Mexico, I happened to be in my van at the time. The transito cops backed down as soon as they saw my phone camera come out. No Problemo, and handed me back my license. That said, I have 3 copies of my license, one in a muggers wallet, and usually swap to an old tag once across the border just in case they decide to take it away for some obscure reason.

    Once, around 2002, my buddy was pulled and the federale took his license plate.


    Spare license, spare plates... no problems:norton
  13. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Probably because a state cop took his.

    Anyway, 2002 is so, like, last century :rofl
  14. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Be real careful with that "I took out my phone camera" line of thinking these days.
    First, you might just get a cop who is having a bad hair day and he'll get really encabronado with you to the point where the entire thing is going to escalate way beyond your ability to comprehend. And it will happen fast. Think it through.
    How would a cop in the USA like it if you took out your cell phone when he stopped you? The answer to that depends on many factors, the cop, the local protocol, the state protocol, etc... Some don't care, some do. Do you really want to putz around and find out?
    Second, and more seriously, not everyone in Mexico likes to smile for the camera these days due to the climate of narco violence and this is often directed at cops and soldiers.
    Don't even think about taking pictures or video of soldiers working at a traffic stop. Sure, some might not mind, but that is highly unlikely and they wear balaclavas specifically so they cannot be identified.
    They have no idea who you are or what you are doing or going to do with any video or pictures, their lives and the lives of their families and relatives depends very heavily on how well they keep their identities unknown.
    Yes, local transit cops don't wear balaclavas, however, in some areas the military are doing all the policing and sometimes that includes the transito work, too.

    It all boils down to why you were stopped.

    If you broke the law by speeding, pulling a U-turn in front of a no u-turn sign, ran a red light, etc... expect the punishment. It's Mexico, not Disneyland. Do you automatically expect a US cop to let you off for this sort of thing?
    I doubt it. You take your licks and you rely on the good nature of the cop if they have one and you hope for the best.
    You don't start protesting, reach for your cell phone camera, threaten to call an embassy, etc... You behave yourself because you know there are consequences. Same goes for Mexico. Many times, if you are polite and can play the ignorant gringo part well enough, they will simply let you go with a warning, no different from back in the USA or wherever you are from.

    If you got stopped for no valid reason and the cop is trying to extort money from you, that is when you dig in and start to play your cards carefully and with skill. Think of the "call the embassy" or "reach for the cell phone" cards as, at best, a non-face card in the poker game and nowhere near being an ace. The presentation of a license you can afford to lose, is a bluff move that often works depending on the cop and your poker face, you never bet more than you can afford to lose, do you?

    Your results may vary, but pulling out a camera is not the greatest idea these days.

    The reason a cop will take your plate is because they can if they are not satisfied with your license and your registration. They will often do that because they know the threat of that will get you reaching for your wallet pretty damn quick because you likely won't want to travel very far without the plate and you won't be getting into another country without one unless you are heading home. They also know you will have no idea where to find the plate later that day at shift change when it gets handed in and it then ends up in the office where you pay the fines which will likely be nowhere near the local police station if the state is running the transitos and not the municipality. Do you know if the state runs the local transitos or whether the municipality runs the local transitos? You likely don't know that, so you are already at a disadvantage.

    Just my opinion. I've been through this many, many times. The good news is that, the more you play the game, the better you get, and the more local knowledge you have of where places are located for paying fines, how much the fines actually are (they vary widely and many are much more expensive now than you can imagine), where you have to go to report things, etc... will help a lot. Most states and municipalities have the same basic set-up, and often, there is quite a distance between various points of interest in the whole game.
  15. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    ^

    Guess that kills the Sony EX3 with an extended boom mike idea :rofl
  16. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Well, young feller, it all depends on what you are going to be taping?
    More behind the scenes of the ADV sign placements?
    or
    Dealing with someone whose having a bad mustache day?
    Uh, hang on, I know what you're thinking so let's not go there...:eek1 Keep it all PG and family oriented.:evil
  17. SkizzMan

    SkizzMan There, that's it

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    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Could work, I guess, if you cupped it in your hand just right.
  18. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Get an old one that is trashed.
    Gut it.
    Slap a CNN sticker on it or two.
    Walk into any event anywhere anytime, especially with a cohort that is wearing a jacket and tie or a dress.
    But never wearing both at the same time as things might become more "complicated".
  19. BobLoblaw

    BobLoblaw Comfortably Numb

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    Probably why I don't have problems, I can do that naturally:D Also I think it helps being an old man. Use rivets for your licence plate
  20. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Maybe "ignorant" is a little harsh, let's say "innocent".
    Though I imagine many people here lost their "innocence" some time ago.
    Like back around when the earth cooled...LOL!