Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Snownut

    Snownut Adventurer

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    All I did was copy the alert from Canada's travel site.. Not trying to make a name at all, the intent was to show different perspectives.. The US may say Mexico is dangerous (along with many other countries) instilling fear, but from another countries perspective the US is every bit as bad.
  2. operaflute

    operaflute Starving Artist

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    I may wrong, but my interpretation was that the "someone" referred to was not you, Snownut, but whoever wrote the warning in the first place.
  3. rockymountainoyster

    rockymountainoyster Been here awhile

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    It was reported the other day that there are 300 million guns in Central North America. There are people in other countries who are not comfortable with this fact. They read the papers and watch television. I don't go to places where I am likely to encounter one of these guns, even with one of my own, but random acts do happen. Our friends in Southern North America do not let us bring guns there and the penalties are severe if you try. Most of our friends to the North who have weighed in on this issue are just baffled by it. I don't know if their constitution or charter or whatever their governing document is has a Bill of Rights or a Second Amendment but I will no doubt hear about it.
  4. dcstrom

    dcstrom Long timer

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    I was on it the day before yesterday. For some reason I didn't know that section was unpaved... I think I searched for info about it some time ago, didn't find it, and just forgot about it. A more thorough search would have been in order eh?

    So needless to say I was a bit surprised when the road ran out just after the first bridge construction site. Considering it was used for the Baja 1000 2 days prior, it wasn't in such bad shape. I think if I'd known it was dirt for 70 miles I would have still taken it, but would have given myself more time. As it was I arrived at Coco's at dusk.

    Here's the end of the road

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    This is what it's like for the most part

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    But then there is a sandy section. I was doing alright, staying in the mainly-straight wheel ruts left by cars, but then there was this one wiggly one left by an earlier bike. I gave it half a chance, and my front wheel decided to take the wiggly one. Pretty soon I was into the berm, and over the top of it.

    [​IMG]

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    Fortunately there is plenty of traffic on that road, so it wasn't long before Baja racers returning home came along and helped me drag the Tenere out.

    In the last 5 miles before Coco's the rear suspension started feeling very weird. Zero damping, apparently. The stock Yamaha shock couldn't take that load on that road, for 70 miles. It's not like I was going fast or anything, average speed was probablly 30-40mph. So now on my way back to San Diego to take delivery of an Ohlins, and make a claim with Yamaha for a new shock. I thought going back to SD would be less messy and cheaper than having the shock shipped to La Paz or somewhere in Baja.

    It's actually lucky that the shock failed this early in the trip - it was one of the things I was unsure about. Now I know it's crap, and fixing it now is a lot easier than if it had failed in Bolivia...

    Will have the shock fitted by the weekend, then I'll be turning around and back to Mexico. May change my route though, now that I have seen at least part of Baja. Mexicali and south-east from there?

    Trevor
  5. rockymountainoyster

    rockymountainoyster Been here awhile

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    Great shots Craneguy... no need to make apologies for cell phone. Very good quality. Which phone?
  6. AK Smitty

    AK Smitty Self life coach

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    I was the one who asked about it months ago and this is where I ended up:

    http://vallartastorage.com/English/contacto.php

    This place is great!! Well I guess maybe I should wait until I pick my bike up!!!:eek1

    But they were great when I dropped off. Over the top professional and polite. 24 hour security and electric fence. You must sign in with photo ID to even get to your own unit. To add a person you need to email a pic. They can do all transactions through email and with CC.

    I will let you know the condition of the bike on the 26th but I felt very good about everything when I left.
  7. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Yes, the days of "carrying a water cup" when hiking are long gone! Our spring is back in the woods with no cows but there are salamanders pooping in the water & my spring box , though sealed wasn't "bug proof". Seems what with the weather thiong/ el Nino` going on our spring also slowed much from the past, so city water was very welcome. I still run it out near my house via gravity(I destroyed the cistern/pump arrangement) from 1,400' away & enjoy a cold drink. We never went to chlorination but I'm always careful these days with my water choices. After my "event" I studied up on water treating & even the iodine tabs don't kill virus's . The Aquatabs do work with a virus but taste like crappy over treated city water!
  8. Snownut

    Snownut Adventurer

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    That may be the case, I didn't take it personal.. :wink: I'm really not a hot head, just was rubbed wrong last week..
  9. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    I'll be spending much of today in the kitchen getting ready for Thanksgiving Dinner tomorrow. It has become a tradition that I, el gringo viejo/el gringo loco prepare a traditional American Thanksgiving dinner and invite my neighbors and hotel guests. They offer to bring dishes but I politely decline. "Yes, I love your tamales but there is no need to bring them, I have so much food here. We will have some of your wonderful tamales next week. "

    So Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes with gravy, sweet potatoes, maybe some steamed carrots and calabasitos. apple and pPumpkin pie for desert. Maybe a little Bacanora after dinner.

    Buen Provechvo!
  10. operaflute

    operaflute Starving Artist

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    That makes a lovely tradition even lovelier.
    So then, will you have the wonderful tamales for Christmas?
  11. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    For the hotel coffee table:

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    "If you’re looking for a heart-warming story that blends together some of the traditions of Latino culture with the American Thanksgiving holiday, Gracias is an excellent choice. The story of young Miguel, who receives a live turkey from his father, a truck driver, to fatten up for Thanksgiving. Only problem is, Miguel and his abuelos live in an apartment in New York city! The book follows the adventures of Miguel and "Gracias," as well as their budding friendship. I enjoyed how the book clearly demonstrates the love that Miguel’s abuelos have for him through the manner in which they allow the turkey into their lives. Turkey for Thanksgiving? Hmmmm. Well, how about pollo instead?

    The book is available in English or Spanish. I have the Spanish version, which does use a few English words embedded in the text, but not many. The English version has some beginner’s Spanish sprinkled throughout the text as well. Both contain a glossary at the end.

    Cepeda’s illustrations are very warm and engaging. His oil paintings bring to mind those of Ezra Jack Keats and easily capture a child’s attention.

    An excellent multicultural book for Thanksgiving. It provides parents and teachers with the opportunity to discuss the importance of family, types of families, and things for which children might be thankful.

    The LBBC has this and many other titles related to Thanksgiving in our bookshop. If you would like to buy your own copy of Gracias el pavo de Thanksgiving, please click here. Or you can follow the link in our sidebar to the LBBC’s on-line store. We have both new and gently used copies available."


    LINK
  12. Craneguy

    Craneguy British Hooligan

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    I mentioned to my wife it was thanksgiving this week. She said "shall I get a turkey?"

    I said, "You're Mexican, I'm British and we don't live there anymore, so why on earth would we celebrate an American holiday?" She smiled and said, after living there 10 years it had become a habit.

    Have fun you guys. All my clients are in the US, so your time off is my time off! :clap :freaky
  13. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

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    Mostly agree TC, except for that "count the murders on one hand" part.

    From a Huff Post/Lonely Planet blog:
    What you don't get from most reports in the US [about Mexico] is statistical evidence that Americans are less likely to face violence in Mexico than at home, particularly when you zero in on Mexico's most popular travel destinations. For example, the gateway to Disney World, Orlando, saw 7.5 murders per 100,000 residents in 2010 according to the FBI; this is higher than Cancun or Puerto Vallarta, with rates of 1.83 and 5.9 respectively, per a Stanford University report (see data visualization here, summarized on this chart, page 21). Yet in March, the Texas Department of Public Safety advised against "spring break" travel anywhere in Mexico, a country the size of the UK, France, Germany, Spain and Italy combined. Never mind that popular destinations like the Bahamas, Belize and Jamaica have far higher homicide rates (36, 42 and 52 per 100,000). Why the singular focus?
    1. Mexico may be more dangerous than the US overall, but not for Americans.
    According to FBI crime statistics, 4.8 Americans per 100,000 were murdered in the US in 2010. The US State Department reports that 120 Americans of the 5.7 million who visited Mexico last year were murdered, which is a rate of 2.1 of 100,000 visitors. Regardless of whether they were or weren't connected to drug trafficking, which is often not clear, it's less than half the US national rate.
  14. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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  15. SeanF

    SeanF -

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    Sounds like a tasty and fun tradition! Happy holidays to you & yours.
  16. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    I'll make a distinction between visitors and tourists. There are lots of American citizens murdered in the border towns. Many are there for nefarious purposes and almost none are tourists. US DEA employees and consular employees are in the count as well. So I'll cop to under counting "on 1 hand" but 120 is too high for tourists.
  17. operaflute

    operaflute Starving Artist

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    Pfft. Last year I made a pork shoulder!
  18. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Thanks Trice, I'll see if I can pick one up.
  19. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    FWIW,I like people with a backbone.esp. the ones that are willing to take the time to explain themselves & move on.
    Back to-Is Mexico safe? yes , most of the time.Is the highway safe, yes most of us make it home by exercising caution. Is the world safe for that matter? Often not, but mostly we move along with our lives and enjoy the high spots. It's all relative.
    Fact: Mexico has one hell of a problem & best not to belittle it with USA ghetto comparisons.Mexico is to go & enjoy the people & the place, the ghetto is decidedly not that way. Lets put it in my personal perspective:The day will come for me to be too old to ride those long trips-@ 69 that time is in sight! Now is my time. I cannot wait until the druggies here no longer want the crap nor until the drug lords are all dead because now is my time! As long as there is a realistic notion that I'll make it home from Mexico & see my grandkids again , then I'll keep going. Say whatever about Detroit,New Orleans or some other urban cesspool/shithole place(take no offense if you live there in the burbs is most likely if at all & your on ADV)) but I'll just go on living my life with some places on my "to avoid list". FWIW, I'm a BB fan & we go to a ballpark in some of those dangerous cities now & then & try to make it a safe/smart trip. Mexico I do the same thing.
    I will say that some of the Mexico statistics as Migueleto presented, are a bit skewed by the fact that most gringos that travel to Mexico are going to a "travel destination" that's a sheltered situation . If we compared Disneyland to the urban area of Orlando,i.e., the ghetto part, you'd likely get much different figures. Same as the figures from Mexico are mostly coming from Cancun type places,i.e., the hotel zone, where very sheltered trips take place.
  20. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    i have several friends who use that facility and all say it's top notch.