Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    Ghad damn!That was fast and violent.Never seen an explosion like that.The one worker at the end was on the ground crawling for his life.That's some scary ass shit.:eek1
  2. deepcdiver

    deepcdiver Nobody Special

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    I think he was past crawling for his life, I think he was dying of his burns. That fire totally engulfed him, and he breathed super heated gases as well as receiving burns. I believe that is why the video stopped at that point, I think got more gruesome not that he would have died quickly, but I doubt he survived. Play it back and you will understand I think. My 2 cents as an FF, I'm just sayin...one moment hum-dee-dum life at it's most mundane, next a horrible painful tragedy. Shitty way to go.
  3. Süsser Tod

    Süsser Tod Long timer

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  4. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    If you want to store it here in Mexico and make sure it is ridden regularly and well maintained, I would be more than happy to help you out.:D
  5. Craneguy

    Craneguy British Hooligan

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    Get in there my son! Who knows, maybe he'll leave waterproofs in the luggage too! :D
  6. CptImagine

    CptImagine NCC-1701-B

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    My favorite Mexican road sign . En inglese "Winding Road" . Down there, It means it .
  7. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Comedian, eh?
    Talked to the Mystery Rider yesterday, Saturday early AM romp to Puente Calavera via Teziutlan. You in or are you modeling the ADV winter line at Palacio de Hierro Santa Fe?
    Breakfast of cecina, jalapenos, onions, purple tortillas, and salsa que pica pica.
    And you think I want to be trapped in a waterproof rubber suit with the aftermath of that????
    I think he might be on the SS Wyoming Express this time, though the engine room is due for an upgrade of hardware to version 120 or something. If he shows up in leather, I' ll lead and you two can trade fashion tips via the intercoms.
  8. Craneguy

    Craneguy British Hooligan

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    What, no Starbucks? :D
  9. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Depends. You have undercover officers and legitimate private security wearing bluejeans. And you have cartels wearing the very same uniforms that the military wears with the exception that they have their own unit badges, so unless you are intimately familiar with Mexican insignia you are not going to know if they are real or not.
  10. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Like SR said.

    If they have white vehicles, even 1 or 2 in a convoy, they are probably NOT official military or police unless (drum roll here) they are undercover.

    There are plenty of subtleties with "real" military vehicles and weapons too. I doubt if you will ever see an AK in the hands of the military although certain police might carry them. Mexico uses a variety of rifles but they usually keep the guys with H&K G3's together and the guys with other rifles together so they can share ammo (the G3's fire .30 and just about everything else that they carry fires .223).

    But bottom line is like SR said - the cartels using fake uniforms en masse and holding towns and roads hasn't happened for a year or two. They were doing that along Rt. 2 between Reynosa and Nuevo Laredo when I left McAllen but that was over a year ago.

    Right now, unless you are in a really rural and contested area, you'd have to be pretty unlucky to encounter a cartel road block. And even if you do you can be pretty sure they aren't looking for you, so just be respectful and the overwhelming odds are they will let you through.

    Do the regulars agree or disagree? :deal
  11. Craneguy

    Craneguy British Hooligan

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    You need to be more concerned with the white Tsuru saloons. They cruise the streets checking out innocent civilians at the side of the roads, often slowing right down to get a good look at their potential victim.

    They pick up seemingly random people from the side of the road, then disappear with them into the traffic at high speed.

    No one knows how long the people are held, but it's a common sight to see pale and shaken men, women and children getting dropped at the side of the road. They can even be seen paying for their freedom directly to the driver. These criminals have no shame!

    It's a huge business in Mexico. Clearly the government is doing nothing about it, in fact, some of the more enterprising criminals actually use white mini-buses so they can pack more people in. They often leave the windows open a little and the look of misery on the captive's faces would break your heart.

    :lol3
  12. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Agree.
    And again, I think the guy who is posting about this is reporting what is new to him, but pretty much common place for anyone here.
    People here have gotten so used to the military doing the policing, it is odd to see a regular cop.
    For example, I had a toe to toe with a Transito here the other day for the first time in awhile. Hadn't seen one for some time since they were all pretty much fired and sent packing when the military took over policing. He was the same breed of corrupt a-hole they had before so they still haven't worked the bugs out of that part of the system. Normal cops here are hard to find, the military are what you usually see.
    If I don't see the military I get the Spider Sense tingles.
    Some locales still have state police but these guys have been supposedly vetted and freshly trained, but like everyone knows it is BS.
    You won't solve the policing problem until you get rid of corrupt state governments.

    As for little Sr. Pena Miento, he's made his deal with the cartels, so they'll stop the extortion and kidnapping and kick back mucho to the chosen ones. And that is that. Back to business as usual to the epoc before the PAN finally won the presidency.
  13. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Excellent. They often also have a high tech Chinese made little B and W TV on the dash whereby they can monitor the government controlled telecommunications system called Televisa.:deal

    Steve, Rafa has your llanta, see you Friday.
  14. Craneguy

    Craneguy British Hooligan

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    Cool! I've heard about this concept called "traction" it'll be good to experience it first hand!
  15. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Don't do that. You will scare the noobs. :lol3
  16. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    A lot of Norte Americanos freak out when they see the military with big guns. When I was in Laredo a few weeks ago I noticed that while the military was rousting some guy on the street and checking his paperwork that all the old men and women just kept walking down the sidewalk, pretty much oblivious to the troops. I walked by, smiled, and said "Howdy!" in Engrish and the guys just smiled at me and nodded. :wink:

    Oh, and a couple of weeks ago there wasn't a Transito or Metropolitan cop to be seen. The "state police" were in force with new white trucks - probably the old trucks repainted but you know what I mean. Someone got reorganized once again.

    As many times as they have had to hire new cops it might be a good time for an old, overweight gringo who cannot speak much in the way of Spanish to apply for a job; the pool of talent must be pretty shallow lately. :lol3



    Yup. it's not the 'merican way, at least officially, but I predict a return to what used to pass as normal, at least in Tamaulipas. The public is sick and tired of the Zetas and everyone knows that if the military, the Gulf Cartel, and the local vigilantes start reading from the same script that it's going to be a bad time to be a Zeta.
  17. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    MX24 west of Parral last week? Could it have been related to this?

    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2012/12/guadalupe-y-calvo-ongoing-battles-for.html
  18. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    You know what is really strange? Is how quickly you become accustomed to stories like the one above.
    A few years back I would have read it, nowadays it doesn't rate a second glance. Unless the numbers are a couple dozen or more, it just isn't news to anyone.
    Sad, but true. Bet a few other people feel the same, right Steve?:deal
  19. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    FlowBee - 84 five star reviews on Amazon.com.

    I always wondered if those worked well
  20. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    Hehehh...dunno. If you saw my helmet hair you'd think Helen Keller styles my hair. The name isn't spam - I have nothing to do with them. It's an inside joke among some friends from a long time ago.

    ObMexico: To be quite honest, I actually wussed out of a trip to MX a few weeks ago because I scared the crap out of myself reading borderlandbeat waiting for parts for my bike in a Tucson hotel room. Rode all the way out and then wet myself at the border and ran home. I'm back in Ohio trying to get my courage up and waiting for another warm-ish break in the weather to make a run for the border again.

    This thread really helps me temper the BB fear mongering with some reality. I really shouldn't read it so damn much - makes the place sound like Somalia.