Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    If Yesenia makes you pollo y mole and you brag about it I will shoot you :rofl
  2. dragoon

    dragoon I'm the REAL Dingo Joe

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    .If I should ask my questions elsewhere let me know.

    A little background. Ive traveled all over US and Canada but I dont think that really counts but I did spend a month in India with misery goat 3 years ago.

    Open to suggestions on this basic trip:

    Cross border at Columbia instead of Laredo and heading to San Miguel de Allende to visit a buddy's dad who has a house there.
    *should I head to route 85 to Monterrey or is route 1 safe. I keep reading get away from the border

    Go to Monterrey or Saltillo see El Salto Falls
    *any recommended places to stay

    Head to Real Catorce for a night
    *route 54 ok?

    At this point I should start feeling g safe? :d

    Then heading into San Miguel. I need to do some more research around San Miguel but I hear tricepilot mentioning guanajunta.

    I don't know how to speak spanish

    Thanks
  3. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Hola Goonie and bienvenidos

    I like your plan, just a few adds:

    Stop by Casona Tricepilot on your way through Texas. I can help you will further details and mapping.

    For this trip you should use the autopistas 85D, 40D and 57D.

    Cross at the Colombia Bridge, using Tx255 tollway bypass off of I35 (just a couple of bucks, the bill is mailed to you). When I came back through the Colombia this past Tuesday I was the only person there using the crossing. Not kidding. Fast.

    Don't stop in Monterrey, it will be too soon after the border crossing and an unnecessary hassle.

    Stop in Saltillo. Any place will be fine but quite often the Camino Real (expensive) or the Hotel Huizache or Rancho El Morillo are used. A taxi driver can lead you to any of these places so don't obsess over mapping unless you want to.

    At Matehuala you make the right turn to Real de Catorce. Nice hotel there is the Hotel Real. Don't leave the next day though, spend at least one full day exploring. Take a horse up to the mines.

    In San Miguel de Allende your good bet is Posada de las Monjas. Have am coffee at Mesa Grande at the corner of Zacateros and Pila Seca.

    José Lopez runs the front desk and will give you a special rate if you mention my name (:rofl)
  4. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    It was a size 10 on mine, the real little guy, but you can use the pointy pliers of a Leatherman in a pinch (pinch...get it? At times I amuse myself), they are not in real tight, very wide thread oddball little screws. The big GS might use a 20 or have used a 20 in the past. I am curious (yellow, now who remembers that flick?) and I will investigate that. The Trice "spare back up" method is really ideal, but I hated the thought of giving Motorrad $2,100 pesos for the priveledge of having a spare in my tankbag. The plug and play with a torx key can be zip tied to the frame for future use for yourself or a friend. If you are doing a group ride, you could divide up the neccesary spares amongst the group, but some poor SOB would end up carting around the complete final drive LOL!
  5. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    I draw the line at final drive spare bits and the ilk. I couldn't fix it anyway.

    The point is to suggest to the casual reader that one doesn't have to be sidelined in Mexico in situations where relatively basic preparedness can make it just an interesting story and not a major pain in the ass.
  6. dragoon

    dragoon I'm the REAL Dingo Joe

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    Gracias!

    Thanks for the info. We'll. Stick to 85, 40,57. We have a place to stay in San Miguel. We're going to be in Austin so I'll give you a heads up on our way through and maybe I can buy lunch and look at maps.

    Ok to continue to ask questions here? They might have nothing to do with safty.
  7. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    I hear ya loud and clear! When I first got the F bike, I joined a couple of owners forums. Tim Cullis had the problem way back with a new bike relatively early in the production run. I downloaded a PDF of his ingenious splice fix into my cel phone along with a complete PDF file of the manual for my bike and a couple of other necessary (IMHO) other things.
    Paid me back in spades to have that with me because, though I had memorized the procedure, I hadn't memorized the wire color connects, a minute in the shade reading the file on my phone had me making the right connects.
    You are correct on the preventative maintenance idea, if you have any second thoughts about a piece on your bike before venturing out in Mexico, especially with a group (because you will drag them down with you and spoil their ride day or ride event, too if you are not prepared) just change out the part. Finding a good place to stash a bike in a strange, hot, little town in the middle of nowhere is going to take a little while. Then, getting the bus schedule and sitting on your tired arse waiting for the AU or some chicken bus and riding it a few hundred kms will probably not be the life changing event Hollywood and their happy endings would make it out to be.

    Also, always carry at least a liter and a half of water and some form of food, and something to cover your head with, and at least a knife and a lighter, always.

    That is a rule I never bend or break especially when I travel alone.

    The items take up very little space in your tankbag and you do not want to be stuck in 45c heat without liquids. I see a lot of guys merely hydrate themselves at a convenient store or Oxxo but if you have trouble back in the sticks off the map, you'll be drinking out of a creek if you can find one. With today's multitools and specialty clothing, it makes things a lot easier than a couple of decades ago, no need to suffer.
  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Like that's a requirement :rofl :rofl
  9. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    When you leave Real de 14 don't backtrack to Matehuala, rather take the road (Mex 63) which goes down to San Luis P. Its interesting and Mex 57 is not.
  10. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Hey Trice, I forgot to mention that the headcovering is a doo- rag with flames and skulls on it and I clench the knife between my teeth when I go into a Jimmy Buffet Margaritaville franchise bar. I then clench my loins with the thought of paying a bar tab in one.
    $24 for 2 drinks, a la chingada...!
  11. Pedro Navaja

    Pedro Navaja Long timer

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    Goonie,

    Bienvenidos! Trice has it right.

    One thing I might change however is when you cross into Mexico. If you have your paperwork already done in advance and are lodging at the border the night before you cross, then I would cross at Laredo and not Colombia. Coming out I would cross back into the US at Colombia, but going in I cross at the Laredos. There is no line waiting to get in, and if you get your tourist card the evening before and have your TVIP mailed to you, then you just ride on through in the morning.

    Here's the process I use.

    1. TVIP in advance via internet.
    2. Day ride from Houston to Laredo. Check in at La Posada hotel (recommended by Trice).
    3. Walk across the bridge into Nuevo Laredo, get the tourist card at the end of the bridge and walk directly back to the US. This is the bridge that is to the right of the hotel as you are looking at Mexico and there is never a queue there for the tourist card. They will not issue you a TVIP from this bridge but will send you to the other bridge. So this only applies if you did the TVIP in advance.
    4. Have a steak at the steakhouse next door to La Posada when you walk back across the bridge. Nice bar and you can smoke a cigar on the patio.
    5. At dawn ride into Nuevo Laredo over the bridge that is to the left of the hotel as you are looking at Mexico.
    6. Once you cross that bridge you make one left turn and one right turn and then you are on the highway loop that will take you to Monterrey. Other than the left and right turn you completely bypass Nuevo Laredo via the highway loop. There is no queue to cross in.
    7. On the return I cross at Colombia to avoid any queues.

    However, if you are not staying at the border but are staying in Austin or San Antonio, etc., then I would cross in at Colombia. You can do the tourist card and the TVIP there without a queue.

    For Saltillo I always recommend El Morrillo. It is on the south side of town. This means when you check out in the morning you are already on the south side of town and won't have to find your way through the city to catch the south bound highways 54/57. After you check into El Morrillo, if you feel like going into town just call a taxi. Good restaurant in town called El Tapanco and it's safe to walk around the center of town. Same family that owns El Morrillo owns the restaurant. Nice bar in the restaurant, you can smoke a cigar on the patio. There's also an Irish pub next door (the Irish are everywhere when it comes to drinking).

    Mike
  12. dwj - Donnie

    dwj - Donnie Long timer

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    I had a spare final drive and seal, plus the knowledge to replace it, but the bearing would not fit in the location for the Halls Sensor! :rofl A used unit from the US and about two weeks to get it wired up correctly and all is well! :D
  13. Pedro Navaja

    Pedro Navaja Long timer

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    A few inches of chain and a couple of master links I always say :D
  14. Hektoglider

    Hektoglider One with Life

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    Careful on those cobblestones to Real de Catorce. A truck blew coolant antifreeze onto the road maybe 2-3 or 4 KM before the tunnel entrance. Might stay greasy until the rain washes it off.[​IMG]
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    We brought a spare clutch cable to be on the "safe" side[​IMG]
  15. bingo43

    bingo43 ¡Que Viva!

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    Casote is an even bigger upgrade. Your house is amazing
  16. dragoon

    dragoon I'm the REAL Dingo Joe

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    That's some great info Mike. Really appreciate it. Dumb question, is the tourist card and TVIP the same thing? Couldn't figure out what TVIP stood for.
  17. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Transitory Very Important Person
  18. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Just a quiet corner of the suburbs

    [​IMG]
  19. Pedro Navaja

    Pedro Navaja Long timer

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    TVIP = Temporary Vehicle Import Permit. It's what lets you bring the motorcycle in. The tourist card is what lets you come in.
  20. rockymountainoyster

    rockymountainoyster Been here awhile

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    Weazy Buddha: It was "Flight of the Whooping Crane" National Geographic Special aired in 1984. Should be available at any good video store that has good documentary section or directly from NGS, maybe even Netflix, I have never checked.