Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Hi Sjoerd, that snake was a wild one that was likely displaced by the tropical storm (Fernando) that blew through here last Sunday. This happens quite a bit when there is flooding. During hurricane Karl, a couple of years back, a poorly run local alligator farm was destroyed and all the stock got loose. At first, they thought people would capture and return the alligators, yeah right!
    Finally, the offered a bounty and then everyone became an alligator hunter.
    One of the gators was found outside the Bimbo bread plant here.
    People pretty much do what they want as far as animals and anything else goes. There are laws which are only enforced for political reasons. Private zoos are quite common among the bored wealthy elitists. From time to time, an animal or two gets loose, it usually ends up shot or killed somehow during the capture. Mexico is fairly strict on importing dangerous species but doesn't have a lot of success.
    The bird problem is tragic. I have often seen, in the Tuxtlas, the capturing of birds and then the sale in the local markets. They use very fine nets and generations of families are experts in trapping birds.
    Ask the Mystery Rider some time what he thinks about neighbors with avian pets (pests?)! LOL!:deal
  2. motoroberto

    motoroberto Been here awhile

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    Thanks for that info. I had only picked Matamoros in the interest of making time, which unfortunately, I will not have much of on this trip. I suppose I could stay on 10/35 a little farther on the US side and enter through Nuevo Laredo, then on to Monterrey, and on to Ciudad Victoria?
    I've heard its best to avoid Tampico.
    There are a couple of historical sites I wanted to check out in Coyoacan if I have time. Otherwise my plan is to head to Puebla then down to Oaxaca, where I'll meet my wife at the airport. I'm trying to accomplish Nuevo Laredo (or Pharr) to Oaxaca city in 4 or 5 days.
  3. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    One beautiful autumn day, a Park Ranger discovered a man sitting in the woods chewing away on a dead Bald Eagle. "Hey mister, the Bald Eagle is a protected species, and killing one is punishable offence", said the Park Ranger.

    The man was swiftly arrested, and ushered before the judge.

    In court, he pleaded innocent to the charges against him, claiming that if he didn't eat the bald eagle he would have died from starvation.

    "I was so hungry" complained the defensive camper, "the Bald Eagle was the only food I could find!"

    To everyone's amazement, the judge ruled in his favor.

    In the judge's closing statement he asked the man, "I would like you to tell me something before I let you go. I have never eaten a bald eagle, nor ever plan on it. But I'd like to know: What did it taste like?"

    The man answered, "Well, it tasted like a cross between a Whooping Crane and a Spotted Owl."

    :rofl
  4. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Aye, guey! The rabbit and the python joke is funnier.:evil
  5. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

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  6. MAXVERT

    MAXVERT OG on da OC

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    Anyone have any idea if the Bosque de Chihuahua Railway right of way is
    rideable ?

    I'm planning on riding a route in October from Agua Prieta,through Huachinera,
    Tres Rios, to Madera, after which I would like to ride the old railroad right of way
    back to Casas Grandes. On the Antiguo Camino de Ferrocarril Nvo Casas Grandes- La Junta, taking the Bosque spur out of Madera.

    I can find some photos of the train right of way, but no info on the condition
    of the tunnels and bridges.

    I'd consider two other experienced riders coming along.
    I'll be on my KTM 690.

    Twist it, Max
  7. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Tury will know. Send him a PM.
  9. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Good thing there is a wire mesh screen between the stage and the crowd
  10. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

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    FYI, I was able to pre-order the kindle edition.
  11. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Request you pre-order me a table at Ten Ten Pie and we share a bottle of Malbec
  12. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    In. Its almost "that time" again.
  13. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Call me jaded but there is nothing new in that book. All of this is common knowledge to anyone who lives here and understands the ebb and flow of politics in Mexico.

    It is a terrific primer for anyone outside who wants to re-live some key events that have shaped Mexico in the 20th century.
    The key to reading these books is to look for the inter-relationship amongst the players. This can be tough for those without a grounding in Mexican politics that sees more changes of allegiance than a battle involving Afghan fighters. Same goes for when you read Krauze's, now available in English, massive tome of the history of Mexico.

    That author is one of the lucky ones, she's not one of the now silenced reporters and writers whose corpses litter the landscape of journalism.
    This book could be a tremendous move forward if someone decides to do a documentary that will present the big picture on the big screen so the entire world can see the farce of Fox, the failure of Calderon, and the fraud of Pena Nieto. The 3 Stooges of modern Mexico.

    The main problem is that, unless you read and understand Spanish, you are very limited in what you are going to read. The exceptions being with Krauze and now this book. For the most part, you are simply going to get an outsiders view of Mexico, usually this is totally useless. You might be thinking Alexis de Tocqueville's "America" but what you usually get is some asanine gringo perspective. Gringo journalists, apart from a very, very few with the right connections, simply cannot connect the dots that are the shady figures of Mexican politics. They don't have the proper historical grounding and with modern journalism standards so low, particularly in the USA which is a damn shame, you get some highly subjective nonsense that is passed off by some publishing house marketing department as being "an insider's look in the dangerous world of Mexican narcoviolence".
    Usually, it's total bullsht.

    Even the leading TV network, Televisa, is as crooked as a dog's hind leg.
    If this book can set a new standard, that is fantastic, welcome, and needed! But if it slips under the radar of world attention, you'll find it heavily discounted some day soon at Barnes and Noble sitting peacefully amongst the business guru and 50 Shades wannabees.

    I'm still waiting for Jorge Castaneda to write his memoirs of the Fox administration. He's probably too nice a guy to do it, but I hope he does.
    Mel Gibson could play Fox in a movie, he'd probably nail it based on his lack of faculties.

    What the world needs to see is how quickly Mexico decayed from Salinas to Pena Nieto. 5 presidencies that pushed a nation over the brink and past the point of return. Knowing how to spell "Echeverria" and why is a great start to understanding things. You can comfortably start there. Or why not really go for it and try to grasp Calles and get your mind around where true evil comes from and how it gets sanctioned and ingrained in a nation and lacerates its psyche for 71 years, skulking away, only to return to do it all over again with another twisted little freak of politics who dances while dangling as a marionette from the strings of those who really hold the power.

    The best journalist in Mexico today is Lydia Cacho, she's got ten years on Hernandez, but you'll have to read Spanish to read her, I haven't seen any of her work in English.

    Ahh, I feel better now, hope the book becomes a bestseller!
  14. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Motoroberto , because you will have your papers before you cross the
    border it really makes no difference where you enter Mexico.
    That some people favour certain crossings is simply a reflection
    of personal tastes , convenience . No matter which crossing you pick
    it involves the same process in several steps. It is not a case as in restaurants
    where one offers chicken, another specializes in Chinese food , or you
    seek out Italian .
    What you should consider is the regular daily rush hour commuter traffic jams at pretty well every border town downtown crossing - TRAFFIC HEADED TO THE USA is especially bad since the US SIDE IS VER SLOW
    To avoid that simply time your crossing for late morning or early evening when the lineups are gone. These lines stretch for many blocks in special lanes along the border fence in designated lanes.with a bike jump to the head of the line in Mexico,do that on the US side and get screamed at by the officers.
    Leaving at Matamoros, Reynosa, Laredo , all okay and easy for checking
    out , canceling TVIP is handled at the riverside customs terminals
    ForEagle Pass and Del Rio , El Paso ,Sonoyta and Nogales cancellation can be done at terminals on the the highways far south of each of these towns. You will not miss
    seeing them.
    Five days to Oaxaca is possible if you don't dawdle too much
  15. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    ok:

    Hola, Jaded
  16. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Yet in spite of all the crap, from my perspective the average Mexican is hanging in there and many are doing well.
  17. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    The rabbit and the snake are looming large, mijo!:deal
  18. Kiko

    Kiko Long timer

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    There are two types of politicians in Mexico,

    1) those who steal everything from the people
    2) those who steal everything from the people, but then give a little back.
  19. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Yes, in spite of everything!

    TC, have you seen Nosotros Los Nobles, yet?
    Damn good flick about the "Polanco style ni-ni" crew.
    Te vas a cagar de rises, garantizado!:clap
  20. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    And those that just take it all and go live in either Ireland or the USA.:deal