Is the old car hobby going to die off?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by discochris, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. ddavidv

    ddavidv Thrifty not cheap

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    Lucky you, living where you do. If I lived in a salt-free environment, we'd be doing the same thing. I think most any 1960s vintage car is easily suitable for every day use. By then, cooling systems could keep up, heaters were becoming standard and radical things like overhead valves were commonplace. It can be done with 1950s cars too, but I think they are a little more involving for both maintenance and keeping them pointed straight down the road. If one isn't picky, any number of 4 door sedans from any vintage can be picked up inexpensively, and if it's a common brand like a Ford or GM parts are never a problem.

    Sadly, I live in a place where they use salt at the first sign of a snowflake, so can't bear subjecting anything that has survived 50 or so years to a constant barrage of what equates to acid to it's metal parts. One local guy does drive his stuff year round (Buick Riviera, monster Pontiac Bonneville) but he does all his own painting and body repairs in his shop so doing an annual rust fix isn't a big deal to him.
  2. MiteyF

    MiteyF Long timer

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    Michigan... temporarily
    I graduated with a degree in industrial engineering/vehicle design. I quickly learned that I want nothing to do with designing cars (with all the safety/comfort bullshit that it seems every car must have nowadays, making a shitty car go for $40k) and now work as a fabricator. Retirement? Fuck that. I'll just die when I'm 60 from all the welding fumes and chemicals. :lol3
  3. BeeCeeGS

    BeeCeeGS WeaponOfMassDestruction

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    New $50 million dollar high school in my town, and they've designed the auto shop to be used for other purposes in anticipation that it won't be needed in a few years. Other new high school doesn't even have one.
  4. wos

    wos Long timer

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    Had a car show up here a couple weekends ago. A lot of really nice old cars. From the 20's up through mid 80's. Full up restorations, muscle cars ready for the dragstrip to rat rods made out of scraps. But they were vastly outnumbered by the new generation of ricers with fart cans and stock cars with a few stickers on them.
  5. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    I wish I took a camera to all the Oakland Rod and Custom Show's I went to - compared to the level of old car customizations there is now it was pretty legendary.
  6. Kris

    Kris Been here awhile

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    Illinois
    The local club had a cruise in / car show Saturday night, out of the 100 + cars there I would say all were owned by people 55 + in age mostly guys in their 60s. There was a Mazda Speed3 and a S10 v8 that had younger owners but that was about it for the youth segment. There were many younger guys there to look (me included) and were obviously interested which is encouraging. As is the custom at these events some are sporting for sale signs but I didn't see a price under 20k. I don't think banks loan on these type of vehicles so it would be cash sales which excludes many younger buyers.
    Some ideas to help this situation; These clubs need to encourage younger guys to get involved. Perhaps a retired guy who is an old car expert could mentor a young car enthusiast. Share that knowledge of car restoration and hot rodding. If you are retired and well off cut a deal on your classic car that you have for sale to a young car enthusiast with the agreement that the car will be kept, not flipped and he will participate in club events.
    Many at these events are sitting in lawn chairs next to their classic car, I have yet to see any of these guys ever speak to my 14 year old son as he pours over these muscle cars he is obviously interested in this hobby. He is the future of this hobby. We have a 2000 Sonoma and after seeing the S10 V8 his goal is a V8 swap for it and has already started researching this potential project. He even washed and waxed and detailed the interior the following day.
    I think many kids would have an interest in old cars and the mechanical world but too many fathers do not. That is where the guys in the cars clubs could help out IMHO.