It's about time you did something about that airhead.

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by kbasa, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy

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    Changing a wiring harness really isn't all that hard. The key is patience and having a good shop manual at your side. Skinny fingers will help once you get into the headlight shell, too.
    Just remember to not let the magic smoke out. That sucks. DAMHIK.:bluduh
    #81
  2. kbasa

    kbasa Roubaix! Super Moderator

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    Not only that, I can read a wiring diagram, I have a digital camera and I'll hang labels from my PTouch on every connection.

    Hopefully, I won't screw it up and everything will work. :fingerscrossed
    #82
  3. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy

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    This is one area where OCD pays big dividends.:lol3
    #83
  4. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Get a few different sets of forceps - they're the best for pulling and replacing connections in the headlight shell. Any other way and you run the risk of pulling the connections apart or pulling the wires from the connectors - those suckers really don't want to let go.

    As for the center stand - you've got the post '81 bike? The problem with those isn't the frame but the stand - it needs to have material added to the stop area. What tends to happen is as the bike comes up on the stand it crashes against the stop. Every time that happens it flattens it out a bit more till eventually the stand goes so far back both tires are on the ground. The stand is softer metal than the stop on the frame, so it's the one that deforms. It's best to ease the bike onto the stand to prevent this happening. I like leaving the bike in first gear and letting the clutch out as it approaches the stop.
    #84
  5. kbasa

    kbasa Roubaix! Super Moderator

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    Thanks! Excellent advice!
    #85
  6. motoboyvfr

    motoboyvfr Guest

    She responded well to the squeeze especially when she found out it was from you. Nice 120 mi. to the Gap and back yesterday. 90% dry roads and no coppers. Now to the garage to continue the teardown...
    #86
  7. kixtand

    kixtand Long timer

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    Ed Korn sells a puller for the bearings, and someone was selling one on here just a couple of days ago. You can also have someone weld a bead around the race and it should drop out after it cools.

    I'd recommend a LOT of effort (force), and a lot of patience; when that dude lets go it does so w/ a vengeance...
    #87
  8. kbasa

    kbasa Roubaix! Super Moderator

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    How'd you do with the harnesses?
    #88
  9. motoboyvfr

    motoboyvfr Guest

    I have no electrics left on the bike and I think I might even be able to put it back together. I got a bonus day off today ( thanks to a big storm in the mountains) and spent most of it in the garage. All that's left is to remove the motor and front forks from the frame. Happy happy joy joy.
    #89
  10. kbasa

    kbasa Roubaix! Super Moderator

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    I'm right behind you...

    Phil shipped me a Sito exhaust, which should be here next week. :wings

    I just need time and motivation to get this done.
    #90
  11. motoboyvfr

    motoboyvfr Guest

    16:30 hours Saturday January 5, 2008 and the S is in as many pieces as it can be. Time for a black and tan I think.
    #91
  12. Cogswell

    Cogswell Spudly Adventurer

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    Way to go Steve.:thumb

    You might as well go ahead and start a thread on your bike too so we can enjoy the progress with you.:deal


    Mike
    #92
  13. motoboyvfr

    motoboyvfr Guest

    I made an interesting discovery about my S last week. After referencing the Mick Phillips book "Twins Restoration" I determined that the bike was a '78 based on the serial no. table in the appendices.
    Further investigation about finishes and such led me to my pal Doug Mo who asked me a few questions about the bike. The answers left no doubt that the S is really a 1977. More evidence was discovered when I removed the motor yesterday and was able to read the factory decal under the right cylinder which is stamped "9 77". Great news as 1977 was the first year that BMW made the R100S. The stock just went up.
    #93
  14. kbasa

    kbasa Roubaix! Super Moderator

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    Dude. You've gotta get some pics of this process going.

    That's freaking fantastic news.
    #94
  15. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Hate to tell you this, but the Germans end the model year in either July or August when the whole country goes on vacation. After Vacation when they start up production again is the beginning of the new model year. It sounds like yours is a '78.
    #95
  16. opposedcyljunkie

    opposedcyljunkie Heavyweight Boxer

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    So his bike stamped "9/77" is considered a 1978 model? Even if it's sold within 1977?
    #96
  17. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Yep, it's considered a 78. I guess it makes sense, because how else would you get new bikes to the showrooms in January unless they were built ahead of time?
    #97
  18. opposedcyljunkie

    opposedcyljunkie Heavyweight Boxer

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    but a bike manufactured in sept 77 can easily be sold by the next month... is this a german-only thing?
    #98
  19. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    I know this is the way BMW works, not familiar with other brands. It does make sense that the next year's models need to be manufactured starting the previous year, but I don't know how everyone else does it - do they manufacture some of the 78 models in 77 and just list them as being manufactured in 78? Here's a little more info:http://www.bmbikes.co.uk/enginechassis.htm
    #99
  20. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    FWIW, I'll corroborate that date thing from my experience. My 95 Ducati was built in something like July 94 and my 83 R80 ST was built in October 82.