I've got serious issues, I want a Harley

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by MotoADHD, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. MotoADHD

    MotoADHD Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
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    San Diego, CA
    Ok, I've owned just about every bike out there. My current bikes are a KTM 990 SMT & a BMW R1200r, but never a Harley. I'm thinking about selling both of them and getting a Dyna Fat Bob. I rented a Fat Bob recently, did 262 miles through out local mountains and deserts and had a great time. At 51 I'm kind of tired of strafing apexes. Many of my sport riding buddies have quit due numerous stays in hospital, died or ride so they can smoke weed, get away from their miserable work / family lives, and bench race over way too many beers at day's end.

    Any Harley riders out there who made the switch from sport bikes??? Traded in the peg scraping and 2100 mile tire changes cause they are trying to get back to something elemental? I'm chasing that joy I used to have for riding that has now turned into a love /hate relationship. I want to get back to riding for riding's sake, and I think the Fat Bob just might be my ticket back.
    #1
  2. scapegoat

    scapegoat Pushin forward back

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    My first ride was a DT 125 at 13, by 16 or so I had Al bakers well used 73 Elsinore 250,moved up to a XR600 and rode and raced on occasion in the desert's of Calif. Then the street bike thing grew on me.....more and more. Bigger faster, newer. An Interceptor,FZR 1000, Ducati's etc. Watched a few guys get snuffed, saw a few friends come close, almost DNF'ed myself more than once. Now at 50+ I cant even begin to think of what going 180 and kidding myself in able to react to road hazards and be in control. My arthritic hands killed the dirt bike thing pretty much although I keep finding myself trying again on different bikes, 2 GS'es, a Steamer, an E900. Somewhere in the last decade I realized I didnt need to go 180 and fly thru the air and bought a HD. 5 HD's later I have no complaints. Want a bike you dont have to pay some jack ass dealer $500 for a valve adjustment for,little to no maintenance needs other then oil changes, No failed water pumps, F/D's and good dealer support with one in every town if something goes south on the road. If you prefer 2 wheeled travel,dont have to have the latest in gadgets and fads you cant beat one to get around on. Other brands and types will come and go till I m gone but I'll never be without a HD if I can help it.
    #2
  3. BigIron

    BigIron Tenured Prof - Leghump U.

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
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    I'd give it a go. You can always switch back if you don't like it.

    I've been all through the list too. HDs, Beemers, a couple of sport bikes, lots of dirt bikes. But I'll always have a Harley if I have a motorcycle. The FXR would be the last to go. The best days on an HD are the days when you got no particular place to go and you just go for a ride.
    #3
  4. 0ldhippie

    0ldhippie Been here awhile

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    Nov 29, 2010
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    Sacramento
    I'm a sickly 63 and can't say I've made the jump from sport bikes to harleys but I've had sport bikes alongside my harleys for 20+ years. I did sell my last real sport bike 2-3 years ago and am down to a supermoto and HD tourer. The harley will be the last to go just because it feels like ya are riding something that needs your attention. Not a toaster like sewing machine.
    #4
  5. tpresten

    tpresten RideUmAll

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
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    Location:
    Cumming, GA
    I am 46 and made the switch 9 years ago. No regrets. All of my Harley's have had zero problems and I have confidence in them to do any trip and the pictures are also better. :D:D:D
    #5
  6. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

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    I'm a couple years younger and like my Road King but it could never be my only bike. I still enjoy strafing twisties and DP riding too much, and in fact having other bikes makes me appreciate the RK that much more when I ride it and vice versa.

    If I were you I'd hang onto one of your two current bikes (they seem a bit similar imo) and replace the other with a Fat Bob. Then if you find you're only riding the Dyna later on, sell the other bike then.
    #6
  7. ferrol

    ferrol Adventurer

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    Think you've already made the decision, and are just looking for validation?

    I'd say go for. Worst out come is just switch back if your not happy.

    Ride the bike that makes you happy and you enjoy. When you stop enjoying something stop doing it. Simple.
    #7
  8. The Reg

    The Reg n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2012
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    Location:
    Traralgon, Victoria, Australia
    Much the same story here;

    Bought my first HD (Electra Glide Std) at 50 and started to notice some amazing scenery for the first time!

    Had a Low Rider - Superglide and Street Glide since.

    Currently on a Wing and several other bikes.

    Would I have another HD? - Yes...

    Would I recommend anyone to at least own one - once? - Yes

    Go for it, feel the machine!

    Enjoy.

    Paul. :thumb
    #8
  9. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    Location:
    Fairbanks, AK
    As much as I hem and haw over different bikes to eventually replace my WR250X, I seem to keep coming back to either a Guzzi V7 Classic or a Sportster Superlow (with longer travel shocks and a taller rear tire, minimum, to get it back some cornering clearance). Just something right about an air cooled v-twin motorcycle...
    #9
  10. JakeS

    JakeS Yup

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
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    Sturbridge MA
    Go for it..
    Im 24 and have had bikes from all realms. 4 cylinder sport bikes, large dual sports, cruisers, and sport touring.
    You have to try them all out while you can. Ride everything is my opinion then figure out what you like.. Im still not sure what i like so im sure ill go through another 10 bikes in the coming years..
    #10
  11. Genehil

    Genehil Adventurer

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    Panama City, Florida
    Back in high school (1966) I ended up trading a portable TV for a 1956 Harley Davidson Hummer... My only HD so far.
    Not my bike... but something like this:
    [​IMG]

    Now I share my time between a '98 ST1100 and a '11 Versys. Each bike makes me appreciate the other one in different ways.
    I say do both.
    As for me? I'm still decidin': '56 Harley Davidson Hummer 165cc, '69 Kawasaki Sidewinder 250cc, '69 Honda CB250, '69 Kawasaki H1 Mach III 500cc, '68 Kawasaki W1S 650cc, '69 Suzuki T 125 Stinger, '65 Honda Sport 50cc, '71 Honda Cub 50cc, '65 Honda CB175, '70 Kawasaki A1 Samurai 250, '71 Kawasaki F8 Bison 250, '56 Triumph Tiger 500cc, '72 Kawasaki S2 350cc Triple, '72 Honda SL100, '70 Honda Minitrail CT70, '75 Bultaco Alpina 250cc, '85 Kawasaki KZ400, '98 Honda ST1100, '11 Kawasaki Versys
    #11
  12. wannabe1

    wannabe1 Been here awhile

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    Oct 28, 2006
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    561
    I feel qualified to chime in here also. I too have had everything from 100hp plus sportbikes, sport tourers, dualsports, nakeds, adventure bikes, and even a scooter (rode it to work today). But a month ago I purchased an 06 electra glide standard. Its big, its heavy, it scrapes floorboards in turns way too easy. BUT, for pure motorcycling pleasure and making me smile I love cranking up that potato potato V twin and going anywhere from around the block to across the state. True, one month of ownership is too short for true love, but I think shes a keeper. Oh and I am turning 50 this year just for reference.

    Do I miss wheelies, curb jumping, sidewalk riding, median crossing, etc., you betcha!

    I see the haters haven't found this thread yet. Ignore them, get you a Harley, wear the clothes you want to and just enjoy the ride.

    PS you will probably find it hard to stop once you start riding so also give the touring HD bikes a look also.
    #12
  13. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I think there are other choices besides a big heavy Harley.
    I have had a number of Harleys over the years and like the old ones better then anything they make now.

    But there are other cool bikes out there you can have fun on.
    Guzzi's, Triumph (new and old), etc.

    There are bikes in the middle between a race bike and a Harley.
    My Harley bias comes from the fact they are all low and very heavy, and 95% of the bikes on the road around here are big twin Harley's ridden by people who dress like the big bad biker who do not know how to ride.
    #13
  14. Summicron

    Summicron Adventurer

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    May 10, 2010
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    It took me til age 60 to scratch the itch and I love my new used HD Superglide. Smooth, rumbling and it is a HARLEY. Two dealers at each end of town. Simple 1930's technology. So much fun and so simple.

    Go ahead, I figured you only go around the Cape once, and someday you will be too old to woeld the thing, but for now, it is great fun.

    Jim
    #14
  15. vecchio Lupo

    vecchio Lupo Diplomatico Di Moto

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Washington D.C. Metro Area
    I am currently a Buell Pilot, so I'm halfway to you. Both my tube frame Buells are slower and heavier than their classmates, but it's all about smiles per miles. I totally get the H-D thing, just not the Skull Pirate thing. Get what you want and ignore the haters and the fashionistas.
    #15
  16. Nadgett

    Nadgett Been here awhile

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    Dec 13, 2011
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    609
    Location:
    Slovenia
    [​IMG]

    Mine's pretty heavy,but it's a hoot to ride. First Harley at age 58.
    #16
  17. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Location:
    Sunny Northern Cuba (aka: South Florida)



    Well that didn't take long. :lol3
    #17
  18. stroming it softly

    stroming it softly twins forever

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2006
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    Location:
    Tucson
    I have owned em all, at 64 I wanted to get back to a bike that looks like a bike, zero maintenance and pretty much is capable of multi day trips, some fun twisties, mild dirt roads. Bought an 09 XR1200 last month and am just tickled to death with it. Sure, it could be lighter and it could be this or that but it is what it is, a basic mc that looks like a bike, rides like one and does nearly everything in a capable manner. I like it.
    #18
  19. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    I made the switch....with a twenty year gap in between. :D

    I quit riding in my late twenties. For fifteen years I up to that point I rode really fast. I got married and simply didn't feel the need to go crazy anymore.

    I never felt the need to scratch that itch...until a couple years ago I took my friend's Harley ten-year-old Softtail for a ride. It handled terribly! It was loud, and I couldn't stop laughing the entire time I was on it....in a good way.

    Some rentals and riding everything from a vstrom to bmw 1200 rt to an st1300....I bought a Road Glide Ultra. It handles much better than the Softtail and it's much quieter, and I still can't stop laughing. Great bike. Different feel. Very fun.

    This weekend I'm going for a 1,000 mile ride, with my wife. I'm 47 now. I can still ride fast if I want, but I don't want. I have no desire to ride a sportbike.

    Cakeeater
    #19
  20. Genehil

    Genehil Adventurer

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    Jan 13, 2012
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    Panama City, Florida
    Same here... I ride a lot differently at 65 than I did at 25. I have a LOT less crashes and I don't seem to notice all the terrible "cagers" that the younger guys moan about. It might be due to that big gap I now leave between myself and the "cage" in front of me that gives me the time I need to see what's going on up there and make adjustments.
    #20