Just Goosing Around... First steps into Guzzi land...

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by England-Kev, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. eldomike

    eldomike Who Cares

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    SLow today...what exactly are you asking...
  2. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

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    I would like to know, the length of a fork stanchion, and the ID (inside dia) I can get the inside dia later by removing a top nut, but I can't find the length of the tube?
  3. davevv

    davevv One more old rider

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    I don't know the answer, but you'd be more likely to find it by asking on wildguzzi.com or GuzziTech.com. That's where most of the Guzzi experts hang out regularly.
  4. woodly1069

    woodly1069 Long timer

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    yeah Kev, have you posted up on the loopframe yahoo group, those dudes are the BEST!
  5. MZRider

    MZRider Neo-Luddite

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    When I get the chance, I find one and measure it.
  6. MZRider

    MZRider Neo-Luddite

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    Just measured one. Inner diameter of the tube down from the threaded top is 26.88 mm, length is 574.68 mm/22.625" (approx. - I don't have any without the bottom bushing). The threaded areas top and bottom are 29 mm with a 1.0 thread pitch.
  7. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

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    That's fantastic Charlie, thanks... I have a cunning plan:evil
  8. MZRider

    MZRider Neo-Luddite

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    Going to have longer ones made and build a chopper? :D
  9. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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  10. vacantstare

    vacantstare Been here awhile

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    maxton gp20s?
  11. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

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    Ok, I am not enjoying this bike, not even a little right now, constant oil leaks, terrible clutch, the rough running, I know bikes were better than this in the seventies, hell I have ridden BSA's from the fifties that were smoother than this:eek1 So in one last try before I get so fed up and sell the thing, I am going to pull the motor and box, and try to sort the problems once an for all.

    Now tell me, what is the correct way to pull the motor from one of these? there is only me, working in a lockup with no bike lift or power, so what is the best way of going about this.
  12. JonnyCash

    JonnyCash turd polisher

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    Oh man, don't lose heart now. I bet once you get in there, you'll find plenty of things to fix, and then it'll be all better. I feel like I've got my T3 pretty well sorted out, and I'm just all blissed out, head over heels for it. I'm not saying that to throw salt in your wounds, but to encourage you in getting through your problems. So what will you be riding for the rest of the season?
  13. davebeef

    davebeef Buffoon

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    Kev,
    Been in this dark place and got the t shirt. My advice, lock it away and forget it for a few months. If you are going to pull engines and all the rest of it you will probably not see any of this season before the salt arrives anyway. If you are lucky enough to have another roadgoing bike then use IT for now and enjoy IT. Otherwise you will end up flogging the Guzzi I fear.
    My B33 and T150V are currently pissing me off and this is the policy I am operating.
    Rgds
    D.:cry
  14. woodly1069

    woodly1069 Long timer

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    Hey Kev I must say I agree with davebeef on this one. Since you have had quite the time of it lately, just put it aside for a while if you can. Nothing like walking away from a problem you can't fix only to return later and it all comes together so easily. After all your hard work on this bike it would be a shame to rush into anything. Of course that's just my $.02
  15. Zebedee

    Zebedee Been here awhile

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    ... I was born a ramblin' man
    Sage words from both Dave and Woodly.

    Hopefully you're in a position where you can throw a dust sheet over the bike for a week or two and give yourself some time to think about other stuff. Be a shame not to see this thread come to fruition after following some of your other threads.

    That's my minuscule financial contribution ... :thumb

    :beer

    John
  16. jellycow

    jellycow Back on track!

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    I was going to say take the ST and get out and make us some fine pictures. But I just read the thread on the ST. :(:

    Nonetheless, I fully agree with the 3 gents above, let it simmer for a bit untill it boils itself dry and the fogs have cleared.

    In a few days/weeks/months: have a look at it with fresh eyes and you'll soon recover. Worked for my all but one time uptill now. Hence my signature; when riding old crap one needs a spare. :deal
  17. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

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    I don't have one running right, right now! :eek1:lol3

    The Beemer is just playing up, this is the first thing that has played up since I found it all those years ago:clap

    As for the guzzi, I need to start it now, I have no light or power in the lockup, so I can't wait for winter to shut me down.
  18. davebeef

    davebeef Buffoon

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    You mean you don't have permission to strip it down in the house!!
    I think you have some domestic issues to sort out first heh heh,
    Rgds
    D.:rofl
  19. MZRider

    MZRider Neo-Luddite

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    Some like to pull the engine and trans as a unit, but it's far too heavy for me to handle that way. I put the bike on it's centerstand, pull the rear wheel, rear drive, brake linkage, swingarm, strap the rear fender to the frame, remove the battery, battery tray, tank, carbs, exhaust, coil and generator. Support the transmission at the mounting bolt, loosen the engine mounting bolt (footpegs and shifter), remove the transmission bolt, raise the rear of the transmission as far as you can before the cylinder hits the frame downtube, remove the nuts securing the transmission to the engine, slip the trans off of the engine, lower the engine back level, support the engine from below, remove the engine bolt, lift the engine out.
  20. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    Kev,
    Your frustration is obvious, perhaps from unsatisfied expectations. I’ve only 2000 miles on my bike and it is early, but my observations from my only exposure to a V7, are not what I imagined they would be.
    Rough running:
    The bike shakes like a Harley, to the point that nuts and bolts loosen and I need vigilence to keep things from falling off. LocTite is my new friend. The battery shook loose and caused the wiring to the regulator to fail leaving me stranded in a place familiar to all...the middle of nowhere. The bolts holding the carburetor top in place backed themselves out and were nearly lost. Tightening them back down improved performance significantly. The bolt holding the left muffler disappeared and the exhaust nut backed itself off. I now carry spare nuts and bolts. It’s much quieter with the headers snug. I’ve had the tank off twice checking the generator, the generator bracket, and I’ve purchased a spare oil supply pipe for the heads out of fear that the bracket is going to slice open the line. The distributor cap has been loosy guzzi throughout. I finally bent the stinkin’ clips a bit tighter and now I’m sure the cap only rotates a couple of degrees during “normal” operations...However...
    The motor doesn’t light up until 3500 - 4000 rpm. It’s just a tractor around town. These are big road bikes and enjoy flying along at 65-70 mph. At 30 it feels like a thumper. At 60 it runs like a Police bike with plenty of balls left for pursuit...
    Clutch Package:
    The all new clutch package was quirky and jerky and grabby and a real source of concern until I ignored all the written material and lay under the bike and set the clutch arm up for maximum throw without touching the rear case. A real PITA but it started acting much better and continues to improve.
    Wet Ones:
    My drivetrain was pristine until I started to actually ride the bike. The first 50 miles dumped 2 quarts of 30W all over the rear of the bike until I sorted out the oil breather unit. Luckily the sump holds 3 quarts and I didn’t destroy the motor. I’m now dealing with weepage from the timing cover seal, both valve covers, and I think the big nut covering the top head bolt. The brand new rebuilt rear drive gives me a drip of 90W at rest. All of this due to excessive case pressures. Motor, tranny and rear drive just can’t relieve themselves adequately. As far as I can tell it’s a Guzzi thing. It’s not wrong, but it IS the way my bike is working. I’ve given up trying to go for the showroom look and I’m now comfortable with the “well ridden” patina. Greasy fingerprints abound. I’m putting the new paint job on hold as I’m thinking she’s alway going to be a “dirty girl”. Moe at Cycle Garden features his Guzzi Girls. They’re all kinda sexy but they’re all kinda dirty and rough. Kinda like an Ambo or Eldo.. I’m not sure if you were expecting to bring home a squeeky clean prom queen, but don’t think for a minute that she’s nothing more than a honky tonk girl..
    So my expectations of this thing running like a German bike are gone, it shakes like a wet dog that should start wearing Depenz...but I’m really liking the thing for what it is...not what I imagined it would be.
    It takes two mechanicians to pull the drive train and it ain’t something that can happen over the weekend. The end result might not be any improvement over what you’re facing now. Spark. Fuel. Pressure. Timing.

    The bike IS strong and reliable and I look forward to many years of service, despite her bad habits.